Government and politics

FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2020, file photo, Myon Burrell sits inside his cell at the Minnesota Correctional Facility in Stillwater, Minn. An independent panel of national legal experts will review the conviction of Burrell, who was a teenager when sentenced to life in prison nearly two decades ago for the murder of little girl struck by a stray bullet while studying in her south Minneapolis home, Northwestern University’s Center on Wrongful Convictions and the New York-based Innocence Project announced Monday, July 13, 2020. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
July 13, 2020 - 10:55 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — An independent panel of national legal experts will review the conviction of an African American man sentenced as a teenager to life in prison for the murder of a little girl struck by a stray bullet, Northwestern University’s Center on Wrongful Convictions and the New York-based...
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FILE - In this Nov. 7, 2019, file photo, Roger Stone arrives at federal court in Washington. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
July 13, 2020 - 10:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Monday demanded more information about President Donald Trump's decision to commute the prison sentence of longtime ally Roger Stone. U.S. District Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered that the parties provide her by Tuesday with a copy of the executive order that...
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File - In this June 15, 2018 file photo, Confetti falls as Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, center, greets supporters after speaking at the Texas GOP Convention, in San Antonio. The Texas Supreme Court has upheld Houston's refusal to allow the state Republican convention to hold in-person events in the city due to the coronavirus pandemic. The court on Monday, July 13, 2020, dismissed an appeal of a state district judge's denial of a temporary restraining order sought by the state Republican Party. The state GOP convention was scheduled to begin Thursday at Houston's downtown convention center. (AP Photo/Eric Gay File)
July 13, 2020 - 10:10 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — The Republican Party of Texas changed course Monday night and accepted a virtual convention after courts refused to force Houston, hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic, to let the party stick to its original plans of a massive indoor gathering. The decision came after the state GOP...
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FILE - In this July 1, 2020, file photo, Abel Gomez waits for his order at Mariscos Linda food truck as dining tables are sealed off with caution tape due to the coronavirus pandemic in Los Angeles. California Gov. Gavin Newsom has extended the closure of bars and indoor dining statewide and has ordered gyms, churches and hair salons closed in most places as coronavirus cases keep rising. On Monday, July 13, 2020, Newsom extended that order statewide and closed additional parts of the world's fifth-largest economy, including indoor malls and offices for noncritical industries. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
July 13, 2020 - 9:36 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Bars and inside restaurant dining are banned throughout California, while indoor religious services, gyms and hair and nail salons are again off-limits in most of the state, Gov. Gavin Newsom said Monday in issuing a sweeping set of closures to head off surging coronavirus...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2020, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., with Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks to reporters following a GOP policy meeting on Capitol Hill in Washington. President Donald Trump’s push to reopen schools is being complicated by a split within his ranks over how to do it. Some advisers are advocating for a massive federal expenditure to make campuses safe. This comes Congress is compiling the next COVID-19 relief bill. McConnell said July 13 schooling will be a priority in the coming package. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
July 13, 2020 - 8:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's push to reopen schools is being complicated by a split within his ranks over how to do it, with some advisers advocating for a massive federal expenditure to make campuses safe as Congress compiles the next COVID-19 relief bill. Senate Majority Leader...
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A helicopter drops water on the USS Bonhomme Richard Monday, July 13, 2020, in San Diego. Fire crews continue to battle the blaze Monday after 21 people suffered minor injuries in an explosion and fire Sunday on board the USS Bonhomme Richard at Naval Base San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
July 13, 2020 - 8:34 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Flames tore through a warship for a second day Monday as a top Navy official revealed that a fire suppression system was inoperable when the blaze erupted while the ship was docked in San Diego. Hundreds of sailors were battling to keep flames away from a million gallons (3.7...
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Rodney Johnson of Chesapeake, Va., stands with his truck outside FedEx Field in Landover, Md., Monday, July 13, 2020. The Washington NFL franchise announced Monday that it will drop the "Redskins" name and Indian head logo immediately, bowing to decades of criticism that they are offensive to Native Americans. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
July 13, 2020 - 5:12 pm
Washington, perhaps the nation’s most reviled city, needs a new nickname for its football team. What could possibly go wrong? Naming opportunities are rife with ridicule, partisanship and humor: Washington Gridlock, Washington Swamp Monsters, Washington Bureaucrats, Washington Subpoenas, Washington...
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Back-to-school supplies await shoppers at a store on Saturday, July 11, 2020, in Marlborough, Mass. School districts across America are trying to decide how to resume classes in the fall amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Bill Sikes)
July 13, 2020 - 5:06 pm
MIAMI (AP) — The resurgence of the coronavirus in the United States ignited fierce debate Monday about whether to reopen schools, as global health officials warned that the pandemic will intensify unless more countries adopt comprehensive plans to combat it. “If the basics aren’t followed, there is...
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FILE - In this Thursday, June 25, 2020 file photo, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director General of the World Health Organization (WHO), attends a press conference, at the (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. The World Health Organization chief on Monday, July 13 slammed government leaders whose mixed messages have eroded public trust on the coroanvirus. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus warned that their failures to stop their countries’ spiraling outbreaks means there’s no return to normal “for the foreseeable future.” (Salvatore Di Nolfi/Keystone via AP, File)
July 13, 2020 - 3:37 pm
GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization's chief on Monday slammed some government leaders for eroding public trust by sending mixed messages on the coronavirus and warned that their failures to stop their countries’ spiraling outbreaks mean there would be no return to normal “for the...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, file photo, Lydia Harris, a temporary worker at the Sacramento Registrar of Voters, looks over a mail-in ballot before it is sent to be counted in Sacramento, Calif. Over 100,000 mail-in ballots were rejected by election officials in California's March 2020 presidential primary, highlighting a glaring gap in the effort to ensure every vote is counted as a national dispute rages over the integrity of vote-by-mail elections. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
July 13, 2020 - 2:54 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — More than 100,000 mail-in ballots were rejected by California election officials during the March presidential primary, according to data obtained by The Associated Press that highlights a glaring gap in the state's effort to ensure every vote is counted. With the coronavirus...
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