Lifestyle

This photo combination shows digital colorization, left, by Anju Niwata and Hidenori Watanave, and original black and white file photo that smoke rises around 20,000 feet above Hiroshima, Japan, after the first atomic bomb was dropped on Aug. 6, 1945. Niwata and Watanave are adding color to pre-war and wartime photographs using a combination of methods. These include AI technologies, but also traditional methods to fill the gaps in automated coloring. These include going door to door interviewing survivors who track back childhood memories, and communicating on social media to gather information from a wider audience. The team has brought to life more than a thousand black-and-white photographs that illustrate the pre-war lives of ordinary people and chronicles the onset and destruction caused by World War II. (Anju Niwata & Hidenori Watanave via AP)
August 13, 2020 - 10:50 pm
TOKYO (AP) — When Tokuso Hamai saw the colorized version of an old black-and-white photo of a picnic held under cherry tree blossoms sometime before World War II, forgotten memories of family members, most of whom died in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima in 1945, came pouring out. “In colorized...
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Kisako Motoki, 86, speaks, looking though a red cellophane depicting what she saw the atmosphere of the night of the Great Tokyo Air Raid on March 10, 1945, during an interview with the Associated Press at the Center for the Tokyo Raids and War Damage in Tokyo Wednesday, July 29, 2020. In Japan, war orphans were punished for surviving. They were bullied. They were called trash, sometimes rounded up by police and put in cages. Some were sent to institutions or sold for labor. They were targets of abuse and discrimination. Now, 75 years after the war's end, some are revealing their untold stories of recovery and pain, underscoring Japan’s failure to help its own people. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)
August 13, 2020 - 9:21 pm
TOKYO (AP) — For years, orphans in Japan were punished just for surviving the war. They were bullied. They were called trash and left to fend for themselves on the street. Police rounded them up and threw them in jail. They were sent to orphanages or sold for labor. They were abandoned by their...
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FILE - This Sept. 9, 2016 photo shows Harkness Tower on the campus of Yale University in New Haven, Conn. A Justice Department investigation has found Yale University is illegally discriminating against Asian-American and white applications, in violation of federal civil rights law, officials said Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020. (AP Photo/Beth J. Harpaz, File)
August 13, 2020 - 4:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Justice Department investigation has found Yale University is illegally discriminating against Asian American and white applicants, in violation of federal civil rights law, officials said Thursday. Yale denied the allegation, calling it “meritless” and “hasty.” The findings...
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Education Secretary Betsy DeVos arrives for an event in the State Dining room of the White House, Wednesday, Aug. 12, 2020, in Washington. A federal judge on Wednesday allowed the Education Department to move forward with new rules governing how schools and universities respond to complaints of sexual assault. DeVos said the ruling is “yet another victory for students and reaffirms that students’ rights under Title IX go hand in hand with basic American principles of fairness and due process.” (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
August 12, 2020 - 6:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday allowed the Education Department to move forward with new rules governing how schools and universities respond to complaints of sexual assault. The rules, which take effect Friday, expand the rights of the accused, narrow the definition of sexual...
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FILE - In this file photo dated Tuesday June 30, 2020, a coronavirus test sample is collected at a coronavirus testing station in Leicester, England. The British government insists that science is guiding its decisions as the country navigates its way through the coronavirus pandemic. But a self-appointed  group of independent experts led by a former government chief adviser says it sees little evidence-based about Britain’s response. Unlike other countries, the scientific opposition to Britain’s approach is remarkably organized. The independent group sits almost in parallel to the government’s own scientists, assesses the same outbreak indicators and has put out detailed reports on issues such contact tracing, reopening schools and pubs, and relaxing social distancing. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira, File)
August 12, 2020 - 3:09 am
LONDON (AP) — As Britain navigates its way through the coronavirus pandemic, the government insists that science is guiding its decisions. But a self-appointed group of independent experts says it sees little in Britain's response that is evidence-based, especially after an upturn in new cases...
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AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;
August 11, 2020 - 9:54 am
Is it safe to ride public transit during the coronavirus pandemic? It depends on a variety of factors, but there are ways to minimize risk. The main way that the virus spreads is through droplets people spray when they talk, cough or sneeze. That means the best way to reduce the spread of infection...
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Lisa Fitzgerald O'Connor poses for photographs at M.S. 324 Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020, in New York. It has been seven years since the central air conditioning system worked at the New York City middle school where O’Connor teaches. As a new school year approaches amid the coronavirus pandemic, she and her colleagues are threatening not to return unless it's repaired. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
August 10, 2020 - 3:17 pm
It has been seven years since the central air conditioning system worked at the New York City middle school where Lisa Fitzgerald O’Connor teaches. As a new school year approaches amid the coronavirus pandemic, she and her colleagues are threatening not to return unless it's repaired. Her classroom...
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Lemiley Lane, a Bountiful junior who grew up in the Navajo Nation in Arizona, poses for a photograph at Bountiful High School, July 21, 2020, in Bountiful, Utah. While advocates have made strides in getting Native American symbols and names changed in sports, they say there's still work to do mainly at the high school level, where mascots like Braves, Indians, Warriors, Chiefs and Redskins persist. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
August 09, 2020 - 11:11 am
BOUNTIFUL, Utah (AP) — At a mostly white high school near Salt Lake City, the steps leading to the football field are covered in red handprints, arrows and drawings of Native American men in headdresses meant to represent the mascot, the Braves. “Welcome to the Dark Side” and “Fight like a Brave”...
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FILE - In this March 13, 2020, file photo, students at Stuyvesant High School leave after classes in New York. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Friday, Aug. 7, 2020 that he would allow children statewide to return to classrooms for the start of the new school year, citing the state's success in battling the coronavirus pandemic. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
August 07, 2020 - 2:20 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York schools can bring children back to classrooms for the start of the school year, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday, citing success in battling the coronavirus in the state that once was the U.S. heart of the pandemic. The Democratic governor's decision clears the way...
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This undated photo provided by Azalia Sandoval, taken in Guaymas Bay, Mexico, shows Carlos Manuel Sandoval showing off the two fish he caught that day. Sandoval was born in Guaymas on Feb. 13, 1955, and he continued to hear the siren call of the sea more than a quarter-century after he and his family moved to Phoenix. He still traveled back to his hometown port and other coastal communities on Mexico's Sea of Cortez at least annually to indulge his passion for fishing. Sandoval died June 30 from complications of COVID-19 at age 65. (Courtesy of Azalia Sandoval via AP)
August 07, 2020 - 12:27 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Carlos Manuel Sandoval lived for decades in Phoenix on the edge of the Sonoran Desert, but he never stopped hearing the siren call of his birthplace — Guaymas, Mexico. More than a quarter-century after he moved with his family to Phoenix and they all became U.S. citizens, Sandoval...
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