BC-Deep South News Digest

July 12, 2019 - 6:39 pm

Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder: this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

R KELLY-INDICTMENT

CHICAGO _ R&B singer R. Kelly has been charged with racketeering and sex-related crimes against women and girls in sweeping New York federal indictment. The 18-page indictment unsealed Friday accuses Kelly and members of his entourage of recruiting women and girls to engage in illegal sexual activity with the singer. Prosecutors allege that Kelly set strict rules for the women and girls, including requiring them to call him "Daddy" and to ask permission to leave their rooms. A news conference was scheduled for Friday morning in Atlanta. By Sara Burnett and Caryn Rousseau. SENT: 1,000 words, photos, video.

WITH:

_ R KELLY-INDICTMENT-THE LATEST _ The latest developments.

_ R KELLY-INVESTIATIONS-TIMELINE _ A timeline of his life and career.

IN BRIEF:

_ FRATERNITY PLEDGE-DEATH _ A Louisiana State University student has testified that Phi Delta Theta fraternity members ordered a pledge to chug hard liquor in a hazing ritual before he died.

_ FIRED DEPUTY-INCOMPETENT CONDUCT _ A Georgia deputy has been fired for conduct the sheriff is calling incompetent, negligent and unprofessional.

_ FATAL HIT-AND-RUN _ Authorities have arrested a white man accused of running over and killing a black Georgia man who had developmental disabilities.

_ DEPUTY-CHILD PORN _ A Georgia sheriff's deputy is out of a job and behind bars on charges of sexual exploitation of children and possession of child pornography

SPORTS:

BBN--BRAVES-PADRES. Upcoming: 650 words, photos. Game starts at 10:10 p.m.

BKN--SUMMER LEAGUE RDP

LAS VEGAS _ NBA Summer League continues in Las Vegas with eight games. Games Friday include: 76ers-Raptors, 4 p.m.; Lakers-Warriors, 4;30 p.m.; Croatia-Thunder, 6 p.m.; China-Suns, 6:30 p.m.; Cavaliers-Kings, 8 p.m.; Pacers-Clippers, 8:30 p.m.; Blazers-Bucks, 10 p.m.; Hawks-Spurs, 10:30 p.m. UPCOMING: 800 words. Compiled by Brett Martel. Developing.

_ BKN--LYNX-DREAM. Upcoming: 150 words. Game starts at 7:30 p.m.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

IN BRIEF:

_ ILLEGAL ADOPTION _ The U.S. Department of Justice says a South Carolina couple tried to get around overseas adoption rules by telling immigration officials a baby they adopted from the Philippines was their biological child.

_ CHECKPOINT INCIDENT-DRIVER CHARGED _ A North Carolina's sheriff's office has accused a South Carolina man of driving through a checkpoint and hitting a deputy's vehicle during the subsequent chase.

_ INSTAGRAM-SHOOTOUT _ Police say the body of a fatally shot teenager found on a South Carolina road was dumped there by a friend.

_ SOUTH CAROLINA LOTTERY _ The South Carolina lottery has posted a record year.

ALABAMA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

TROPICAL WEATHER _ Building toward hurricane strength, Tropical Storm Barry began hitting Louisiana with wind and rain Friday as it closed in for what could be a long, slow _ and epic _ drenching that could trigger flooding in and around New Orleans. With the storm expected to blow ashore by early Saturday as the first hurricane of the season, National Guard troops and rescue crews were posted around the state with boats, high-water vehicles and helicopters. Drinking water was lined up. Utility repair crews with bucket trucks moved into position in the region. And homeowners sandbagged their property or packed up and left. By Kevin McGill and Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 850 words, photos, video.

WITH:

_ TROPICAL WEATHER-THE LATEST _ The latest developments.

TROPICAL STORM-STAY OR GO? _ Go or stay? This is the question people in and around New Orleans ask themselves every time a threatening storm lurks in the Gulf. The city has a unique set of circumstances: As underscored by Katrina 14 years ago, oftentimes the properties that are most susceptible to the greatest storm damage are located in marginal areas where residents aren’t able to leave. By Rebecca Santana, Kevin McGill and Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 500 words, photos.

TROPICAL WEATHER-NEW ORLEANS LEVEES _ Tropical Storm Barry is packing a soggy punch that will test New Orleans' flood defenses this weekend. Forecasters expect 10 to 20 inches of rain to fall on New Orleans through Sunday. The Mississippi River is expected to crest Saturday at about 19 feet in the city, where levees protecting it from the water range from about 20 to 25 feet in height. Nerves are frayed even though officials don't expect water to overtop the river levees. By Michael Kunzelman. SENT: 650 words, photos, video.

TROPICAL WEATHER-FLOOD MEMORIES _ Memories of an epic flood that caused billions of dollars in damage had Louisiana's capital on edge Friday as Tropical Storm Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico. By Jay Reeves. SENT: 330 words, photos.

TROPICAL WEATHER-WATER WOES

NEW ORLEANS _ Reinforced and strengthened over the years, New Orleans' levees have never been overtopped in the city's modern-day history. But they have become more of a focus during the run-up to Tropical Storm Barry because of a rare confluence of events. The Mississippi River is swollen by months of rain and it will be coming up against a storm surge from the Gulf that will make it difficult for river water to flow out. By Rebecca Santana. SENT: 828 words, photos, videos.

PAROLE BOARD

MONTGOMERY, Ala. _ Gov. Kay Ivey has named former attorney general Charles Graddick as the new director of the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles. Ivey made the appointment Friday under a new law that gives her the authority to appoint the director. He will take the position Sept. 1. By Kim Chandler. SENT: 351 words

IN BRIEF:

_ FATAL POLICE CHASE _ Alabama authorities say a high-speed chase with a fleeing driver ended with the driver being found dead.

_ PSYCHIATRIST-UNWARRANTED PRESCRIPTIONS _ An Alabama psychiatrist has been charged with violating the Controlled Substances Act months after he was punished by the state medical examiners board for prescribing hazardous doses of stimulant medication.

LOUISIANA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

TROPICAL WEATHER _ Building toward hurricane strength, Tropical Storm Barry began hitting Louisiana with wind and rain Friday as it closed in for what could be a long, slow _ and epic _ drenching that could trigger flooding in and around New Orleans. With the storm expected to blow ashore by early Saturday as the first hurricane of the season, National Guard troops and rescue crews were posted around the state with boats, high-water vehicles and helicopters. Drinking water was lined up. Utility repair crews with bucket trucks moved into position in the region. And homeowners sandbagged their property or packed up and left. By Kevin McGill and Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 850 words, photos, video.

WITH:

_ TROPICAL WEATHER-THE LATEST _ The latest developments.

TROPICAL STORM-STAY OR GO? _ Go or stay? This is the question people in and around New Orleans ask themselves every time a threatening storm lurks in the Gulf. The city has a unique set of circumstances: As underscored by Katrina 14 years ago, oftentimes the properties that are most susceptible to the greatest storm damage are located in marginal areas where residents aren’t able to leave. By Rebecca Santana, Kevin McGill and Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 500 words, photos.

TROPICAL WEATHER-NEW ORLEANS LEVEES _ Tropical Storm Barry is packing a soggy punch that will test New Orleans' flood defenses this weekend. Forecasters expect 10 to 20 inches of rain to fall on New Orleans through Sunday. The Mississippi River is expected to crest Saturday at about 19 feet in the city, where levees protecting it from the water range from about 20 to 25 feet in height. Nerves are frayed even though officials don't expect water to overtop the river levees. By Michael Kunzelman. SENT: 650 words, photos, video.

TROPICAL WEATHER-FLOOD MEMORIES _ Memories of an epic flood that caused billions of dollars in damage had Louisiana's capital on edge Friday as Tropical Storm Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico. By Jay Reeves. SENT: 330 words, photos.

TROPICAL WEATHER-WATER WOES

NEW ORLEANS _ Reinforced and strengthened over the years, New Orleans' levees have never been overtopped in the city's modern-day history. But they have become more of a focus during the run-up to Tropical Storm Barry because of a rare confluence of events. The Mississippi River is swollen by months of rain and it will be coming up against a storm surge from the Gulf that will make it difficult for river water to flow out. By Rebecca Santana. SENT: 828 words, photos, videos.

IN BRIEF:

_ FRATERNITY PLEDGE-DEATH _ A Louisiana State University student has testified that Phi Delta Theta fraternity members ordered a pledge to chug hard liquor in a hazing ritual before he died.

_ DAY CARE-REVOKED LICENSE _ The Louisiana Department of Education revoked a day care center's license for failing to report that they left a child alone in a hot van last month.

MISSISSIPPI (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

TROPICAL WEATHER _ Building toward hurricane strength, Tropical Storm Barry began hitting Louisiana with wind and rain Friday as it closed in for what could be a long, slow _ and epic _ drenching that could trigger flooding in and around New Orleans. With the storm expected to blow ashore by early Saturday as the first hurricane of the season, National Guard troops and rescue crews were posted around the state with boats, high-water vehicles and helicopters. Drinking water was lined up. Utility repair crews with bucket trucks moved into position in the region. And homeowners sandbagged their property or packed up and left. By Kevin McGill and Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 850 words, photos, video.

WITH:

_ TROPICAL WEATHER-THE LATEST _ The latest developments.

TROPICAL STORM-STAY OR GO? _ Go or stay? This is the question people in and around New Orleans ask themselves every time a threatening storm lurks in the Gulf. The city has a unique set of circumstances: As underscored by Katrina 14 years ago, oftentimes the properties that are most susceptible to the greatest storm damage are located in marginal areas where residents aren’t able to leave. By Rebecca Santana, Kevin McGill and Janet McConnaughey. SENT: 500 words, photos.

TROPICAL WEATHER-NEW ORLEANS LEVEES _ Tropical Storm Barry is packing a soggy punch that will test New Orleans' flood defenses this weekend. Forecasters expect 10 to 20 inches of rain to fall on New Orleans through Sunday. The Mississippi River is expected to crest Saturday at about 19 feet in the city, where levees protecting it from the water range from about 20 to 25 feet in height. Nerves are frayed even though officials don't expect water to overtop the river levees. By Michael Kunzelman. SENT: 650 words, photos, video.

TROPICAL WEATHER-FLOOD MEMORIES _ Memories of an epic flood that caused billions of dollars in damage had Louisiana's capital on edge Friday as Tropical Storm Barry gained strength in the Gulf of Mexico. By Jay Reeves. SENT: 330 words, photos.

TROPICAL WEATHER-WATER WOES

NEW ORLEANS _ Reinforced and strengthened over the years, New Orleans' levees have never been overtopped in the city's modern-day history. But they have become more of a focus during the run-up to Tropical Storm Barry because of a rare confluence of events. The Mississippi River is swollen by months of rain and it will be coming up against a storm surge from the Gulf that will make it difficult for river water to flow out. By Rebecca Santana. SENT: 828 words, photos, videos.

IN BRIEF:

_ FORMER DEPUTY-THREAT _ A former sheriff's deputy in northern Mississippi has been indicted on a charge of retaliation against a public servant for allegedly threatening to harm his boss.

_ CITY ATTORNEY-DUI TEST REFUSAL _ A judge has dismissed a drunken driving charge against a Mississippi city attorney, ruling the man was unconstitutionally stopped by highway patrol.

_ SOUTH PIKE SUPERINTENDENT _ A Mississippi school district has hired a new superintendent as it tries to improve its state rating.

_ ELDORADO RESORTS-CAESARS _ Casino company Eldorado Resorts Inc. says it is selling two of its 26 properties and will use the proceeds to help it buy Caesars Entertainment Corp. Reno-based Eldorado announced Thursday that Rhode Island-based Twin River Worldwide Holdings Inc. will buy the Lady Luck Casino in Vicksburg, Mississippi, and the Isle of Capri property in Kansas City, Missouri, for a combined $230 million.

_ MISSISSIPPI-WRONGFUL CONVICTION _ Two men are charged with murder in the shooting death of a Mississippi man who spent 12 years imprisoned on a wrongful conviction

____

If you have stories of regional or statewide interest, please email them to

The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau: apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau: apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau: nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

If you have photos of regional or statewide interest, please send them to the AP state photo center in New York, 888-273-6867. For access to AP Newsroom and other technical issues, contact AP Customer Support at apcustomersupport@ap.org or 877-836-9477.

AP Editorial Categories: 
Comments ()