BC-Deep South News Digest, RETRANSMITTING

May 18, 2019 - 2:54 pm

Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder: this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

RURAL HEALTH-EMERGENCY ROOM

ELLIJAY, Ga. _ A north Georgia community has come up with a unique approach to emergency medicine. Gilmer County residents were concerned about three years ago when the local hospital prepared to close, WABE Radio reported. SENT: 342 words.

RECYCLING-INVESTMENTS

ALBANY, N.Y. _ The halt on China's imports of wastepaper and plastic that has disrupted U.S. recycling programs has also spurred investment in American plants that process recyclables. U.S. paper mills are expanding capacity to take advantage of a glut of cheap scrap. Some facilities that previously exported plastic or metal to China have retooled so they can process it themselves. By Mary Esch. SENT: 864 words.

AP Photos NJSW101-0507190305, NJSW102-0507190216, NJSW103-0507190157, NJSW104-0507190149, NJSW105-0507190523.

ABORTION-RAPE TESTIMONIALS

COLUMBUS, Ohio _ For more than two decades, Nancy Mace did not speak publicly about her rape. In April, when she finally broke her silence, she chose the most public of forums — before her colleagues in South Carolina's legislature. A bill was being debated that would ban all abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected; Mace, a Republican lawmaker, wanted to add an exception for rape and incest. When some of her colleagues in the House dismissed her amendment — some women invent rapes to justify seeking an abortion, they claimed — she could not restrain herself. By Julie Carr Smyth and Christina A. Cassidy.SENT: 1,021 words.

AP Photos SCCOL401-0517192116, OHTOL510-0416190000, OHTOL511-0416190000, PX201-0325191130. d its doors. WABE reports that it’s among the first of its kind in the region.Information from WABE Radio. UPCOMING: 300 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGE:

POSSIBLE SLAVE CEMETERY

CARROLLTON, Ga. _ Lord knows how many times in the 113-year-old history of the University of West Georgia that students have picnicked, played Frisbee or casually walked across a small, grassy plot of land in the middle of the campus. The school west of Atlanta was once the home of Thomas Bonner, one of the 19th century's largest Carroll County slaveholders. In 1906, the former Bonner Plantation was turned over to the state where it eventually became the core of what today is the university. Few visible remnants of the plantation remain, most notably the Bonner House, which serves as the university's welcome center. But recent archaeological tests suggest the long-forgotten remains of Bonner's slaves might be buried here. By Ernie Suggs, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

IN BRIEF:

_ HITACHI-GEORGIA EXPANSION _ A company that manufactures vehicle components for major automakers is launching a $100 million expansion of its plant in Georgia.

_ COURT CLERK-THEFTS _ A former Georgia court clerk sent to prison for stealing large sums of money deposited in her care has settled a civil lawsuit by agreeing to forfeit half of her pension.

IN SPORTS:

BBN-BREWERS-BRAVES

ATLANTA _ Chase Anderson is expected to come off the injured list to start Saturday night’s game as the Milwaukee Brewers face Kevin Gausman and the Atlanta Braves on Saturday night. Anderson is returning from a finger injury on his right hand. By Charles Odum. UPCOMING: 700 words, photos. Game starts at 7:20 p.m.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

XGR-HISTORICAL LEGISLATIVE SESSION

COLUMBIA, S.C. _ During the last week of this year's legislative session in South Carolina, eight of the state's nine African American women serving in the House gathered to record a historic moment. This is the first time in the state's history that nine African American women have served simultaneously in the House of Representatives, a moment shared among a sisterhood of women who say their primary mission is to serve and create positive change. By Christina L. Myers. SENT: 904 words.

AP Photos RPCM101-0508191134, RPCM102-0507191343.

CONVERSE COLLEGE-CO-ED PROPOSAL

SPARTANBURG, S.C. _ Converse College is considering co-educational undergraduate programs for the first time in the South Carolina liberal arts school's nearly 130-year history. President Krista Newkirk believes the school could maintain the women's college experience while admitting male undergraduate students, but some alumni are skeptical, the Spartanburg Herald-Journal reported. SENT: 826 words.

ABORTION-RAPE TESTIMONIALS

COLUMBUS, Ohio _ For more than two decades, Nancy Mace did not speak publicly about her rape. In April, when she finally broke her silence, she chose the most public of forums — before her colleagues in South Carolina's legislature. A bill was being debated that would ban all abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected; Mace, a Republican lawmaker, wanted to add an exception for rape and incest. When some of her colleagues in the House dismissed her amendment — some women invent rapes to justify seeking an abortion, they claimed — she could not restrain herself. By Julie Carr Smyth and Christina A. Cassidy. SENT: 1,021 words.

AP Photos SCCOL401-0517192116, OHTOL510-0416190000, OHTOL511-0416190000, PX201-0325191130.

ELECTION 2020-BERNIE SANDERS

COLUMBIA, S.C. _ Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders wants to suspend taxpayer funding of new charter schools and ban those that are for-profit as part of his plan to overhaul public education that he released on Saturday. Saying charter schools are "exacerbating educational segregation," Sanders proposes more transparency and accountability for them, as well as limits on the pay of their chief executives. According to the campaign, the 10-point plan focuses on "reversing racial and economic segregation that is plaguing elementary and secondary schools." By Meg Kinnard. SENT: 435 words.

AP Photos NCCHN401-0703181829.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

WOMEN’S PRISON

GREENWOOD _ In one of the largest areas of Leath Correctional Institution, the cacophony of sewing machines is almost enough to drown out sounds of inmate laughter and conversation. As women in the Prison Industries' private sector section create T-shirts for firms that contract with the U.S. Army, Disney and AT&T, other teal-clad inmates are busy at work producing linens, bedding and clothing distributed throughout the state's Department of Corrections system. By Adam Benson. The Index Journal of Greenwood.

IN BRIEF:

_ POLICE TRAINING _ The Charleston Police Department is looking for people to participate in a critical incident scenario for training purposes.

_ STATE FAIR _ The South Carolina State Fair this year marks its 150th anniversary of showcasing the state's agricultural roots.

IN SPORTS:

CAR--NASCAR-ALL-STAR RACE

CONCORD, N.C. _ Clint Bowyer starts up front as he looks to win his first NASCAR All-Star Race _ and the $1 million top prize _ in 10 tries at Charlotte Motor Speedway. By Pete Iacobelli. UPCOMING, from 8 p.m. start.

ALABAMA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

CIVIL WAR MONUMENT

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. _ A Civil War group plans to rededicate a monument in Birmingham for Union soldiers. The Sons of Union Veterans-Civil War will rededicate the 1891 Grand Army of the Republic monument on Sunday afternoon, Al.com reported . The ceremony will be held at Oak Hill Cemetery in Birmingham. SENT: 228 words.

ASU-150 YEARS

MONTGOMERY, Ala. _ Alabama State University has honored its founders at an event commemorating its 150th anniversary. Nine former slaves established the Lincoln Normal School in Marion, Alabama, in 1867. The school later moved to Montgomery and changed its name to ASU. SENT:572 words.

ABORTION-RAPE TESTIMONIALS

COLUMBUS, Ohio _ For more than two decades, Nancy Mace did not speak publicly about her rape. In April, when she finally broke her silence, she chose the most public of forums — before her colleagues in South Carolina's legislature. A bill was being debated that would ban all abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected; Mace, a Republican lawmaker, wanted to add an exception for rape and incest. When some of her colleagues in the House dismissed her amendment — some women invent rapes to justify seeking an abortion, they claimed — she could not restrain herself. By Julie Carr Smyth and Christina A. Cassidy. SENT: 1,021 words.

AP Photos SCCOL401-0517192116, OHTOL510-0416190000, OHTOL511-0416190000, PX201-0325191130.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

CIVIL WAR MUSEUM

FLORENCE, Ala. _ Employees with the city's Arts and Museums Department have been getting Pope's Tavern Museum ready to reopen in June, according to Arts and Museums Superintendent Libby Jordan. Since closing the museum Jan. 1, Jordan said there have been numerous changes taking place, from planning repairs and upgrades to using the museum's various artifacts in a whole new way. The goal is to give visitors the opportunity to use artifacts to tell the story of the Civil War and how it pertains to Lauderdale County, Jordan said.

IN BRIEF:

_ GRADUATION PARTY-SHOOTING _ Alabama authorities say a high school graduation party fueled by alcohol spiraled out of control early Saturday, leaving one person dead.

IN SPORTS:

BOX--WILDER-BREAZEALE

NEW YORK _ Deontay Wilder defends his heavyweight title against Dominic Breazeale at Barclays Center in Brooklyn. Wilder moved on the mandatory defense after being unable to secure a rematch with Tyson Fury following their draw in December. By Brian Mahoney. UPCOMING: 700 words, photos. Main event about 11 p.m.

LOUISIANA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

LOUISIANA STATE DEBT

BATON ROUGE, La. _ Louisiana's debt load has declined for the first time in a decade, a notable benchmark in a state trying to get a handle on its finances after years of budget gaps and record borrowing. But the amount Louisiana owes for every man, woman, and child still outstrips the national average. An updated debt report presented to the State Bond Commission shows Louisiana's per capita, tax-supported debt dipped to $1,497 in 2018, down $61 per person from $1,558 a year earlier, as the state works to shrink its outstanding obligations for construction projects. By Melinda Deslatte. SENT: 513 words.

WITH: LOUISIANA STATE DEBT-GLANCE

RECYCLING-INVESTMENTS

ALBANY, N.Y. _ The halt on China's imports of wastepaper and plastic that has disrupted U.S. recycling programs has also spurred investment in American plants that process recyclables. U.S. paper mills are expanding capacity to take advantage of a glut of cheap scrap. Some facilities that previously exported plastic or metal to China have retooled so they can process it themselves. By Mary Esch. SENT: 864 words.

AP Photos NJSW101-0507190305, NJSW102-0507190216, NJSW103-0507190157, NJSW104-0507190149, NJSW105-0507190523.

FLOODING-MISSISSIPPI RIVER BARGES

OMAHA, Neb. _ Normally this time of year, huge barges can be seen chugging up the Mississippi River, carrying millions of tons of grain to market and bringing agriculture-related products to farmers in the Midwest for the new growing season. But there's not much barge traffic this year. That's because historic spring flooding that swamped and tainted farmland, also left parts of the Mississippi closed for business. By Margery A. Beck. SENT: 702 words.

AP Photos MP201-0514190801, MP202-0514190759, MP203-0514190759, MP204-0514190900.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-JUVENILE LIFER TO LSU GRAD

BATON ROUGE, La. _ Three years ago, Andrew Hundley was still in prison. And only a few years before that, he had little hope he would ever re-enter society. But now Hundley has graduated from LSU with honors _ a far cry from the Louisiana state prisons where he served almost 20 years. By Grace Toohey. The Advocate.

IN BRIEF:

_ FOSTER PARENT RECRUITMENT _ Louisiana's child welfare agency is launching a new recruitment campaign searching for potential foster parents willing to care for teenagers.

MISSISSIPPI (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

STRIPPER DISCRIMINATION

JACKSON, Miss. _ A Mississippi jury has awarded a total of more than $3 million to five African American strippers after a federal judge found the women worked under worse conditions than their white colleagues. U.S. District Judge Henry T. Wingate ruled in the discrimination case last year. After a trial that lasted nearly a week on the question of damages, jurors decided Wednesday that the women would split $3.3 million for back pay and past and future suffering. By Emily Wagster Pettus. SENT: 303 words.

WATER WARNING

JACKSON, Miss. _ If fishing, swimming or going wading is your thing, don't do it in the Pearl River or Jackson area waterways. The state is warning residents to stay away until further notice because of ongoing wastewater overflows from Jackson's waterwater treatment plants and sewer infrastructure, The Clarion Ledger reported. SENT: 375 words.

FLOODING-MISSISSIPPI RIVER BARGES

OMAHA, Neb. _ Normally this time of year, huge barges can be seen chugging up the Mississippi River, carrying millions of tons of grain to market and bringing agriculture-related products to farmers in the Midwest for the new growing season. But there's not much barge traffic this year. That's because historic spring flooding that swamped and tainted farmland, also left parts of the Mississippi closed for business. By Margery A. Beck. SENT: 702 words.

AP Photos MP201-0514190801, MP202-0514190759, MP203-0514190759, MP204-0514190900.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-TEEN BUSINESSMEN

GAUTIER, Miss. _ Make no mistake, Drake and Chase Killingsworth are not your typical teenagers. Drake, 18, is a graduating senior at Gautier High School, where Chase, 16, is a freshman. By Warren Kulo. The Mississippi Press.

IN BRIEF:

_ ELDERLY FATAL _ An elderly man has been arrested for the fatal shooting of his girlfriend.

_ SUMMER FOOD PROGRAM _ A north Mississippi group is gearing up for a summer nutrition program to help needy families.

_ FREE SMOKE ALARMS _ The Mississippi Fire Marshal's office is giving away smoke alarms to try to reduce fire deaths.

___

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