BC-Deep South News Digest SATURDAY

August 17, 2019 - 2:36 pm

Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to:

The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org

The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org

The Montgomery AP Bureau at 334-262-5947 or apalabama@ap.org

The New Orleans AP Bureau at 504-523-3931 or nrle@ap.org

The Jackson AP Bureau at 601-948-5897 or jkme@ap.org

For up-to-the minute information on AP's coverage, visit Coverage Plan at newsroom.ap.org.

Deep South Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. Administrative Correspondent Rebecca Santana can be reached at 504-523-3931 or rsantana@ap.org. A reminder: this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date.

Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

GEORGIA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

ELECTION 2020-PROGRESSIVES-BLACK CHURCH

COLLEGE PARK, Ga. _ Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren framed their Democratic presidential bids in personal, faith-based terms Saturday before black millennial Christians who could help determine which candidate becomes the leading progressive alternative to former Vice President Joe Biden. Sanders, the Vermont senator whose struggles with black voters helped cost him the 2016 nomination, told the Young Leaders Conference assembly that his family history has shaped his approach to President Donald Trump's divisiveness and the rise in white nationalism in the United States. By Bill Barrow. SENT: 598 words.

AP Photos IAJL125-0811191546, NHEA112-0814191415.

VOTING MACHINES-GEORGIA

ATLANTA _ Georgia election officials have for years ignored, downplayed and failed to address serious problems with the state's election management system and voting machines, a federal judge said in a scathing order this week. U.S. District Judge Amy Totenberg said those problems place a burden on citizens' rights to cast a vote and have it reliably counted. She called Georgia's voting system "antiquated, seriously flawed, and vulnerable to failure, breach, contamination, and attack." By Kate Brumback. SENT: 1,039 words.

AP Photos NY111-0724191456.

DOGGY CON ATLANTA

ATLANTA _ In anticipation of the Dragon Con convention, dog owners and spectators will gather in Atlanta's Woodruff Park on Saturday for Doggy Con, a smaller convention featuring a pet parade and costume contest. Organizers expect at least 40 dogs and 150 people to attend. By Andrea Smith. Developing. With AP Photo.

CLEAR THE SHELTERS

OPELIKA, Ala. _ Humane societies in Alabama and Georgia are among many participating in this weekend's "Clear the Shelters" events. The events are aimed at finding owners for the animals. SENT: 246 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-AWARD WINNING-STREET SWEEPER

MACON, Ga. _ Roderick Bell rides a street sweeper through town as the sun rises over Macon. He is headed to Fort Hill Street in East Macon at around 20 miles per hour. Some people honk. Others just glare, but Bell knows why his job matters. By Jenna Eason. The Macon Telegraph. AP Photo.

IN BRIEF:

_ GEORGIA CRIME LAB _ A new state crime lab in southeast Georgia has opened with nearly three times as much space as the Savannah laboratory it’s replacing.

_ GREYHOUND CRASH _ A passenger on a Greyhound bus that collided with a truck took a photo of the driver using the phone shortly before the crash.

_ GULLAH GEECHEE MEETING _ The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission is holding its next community meeting at a historical site near Wilmington, where members will hear updates on various projects in North Carolina.

IN SPORTS:

BBN--DODGERS-BRAVES

ATLANTA _ Hyun-Jin Ryu goes for his 13th win as the Los Angeles Dodgers try to keep dominating the Atlanta Braves. Los Angeles is 18-6 against the Braves since 2016, and Ryu enters with a 1.45 ERA that leads the majors. By George Henry. UPCOMING. 700 words with photo

FBC--PICK SIX-TOUGHEST SCHEDULES

UNDATED _ South Carolina has the type of brutal schedule that could help the Gamecocks be a better team that winds up with a worse record than last year. The Gamecocks host both of the participants in last year's College Football Playoff championship game: Clemson and Alabama. They also travel to Georgia, the runner-up in the national championship game two years ago. By Steve Megargee. SENT: 909 words.

AP Photos NY156-0901181526, NY163-0909180007, LAGH105-0807190639, MICO202-0413192126, NY903-1028180153.

SOUTH CAROLINA (All times Eastern)

TOP STORIES:

COMMUNITY BLUEPRINT

SPARTANBURG, S.C. _ A South Carolina community has begun the long-awaited work on a transformation plan. About 200 stakeholders in Spartanburg's Highland community met Monday to start work on a blueprint meant to guide changes and renewal of the neighborhood in coming years, The Spartanburg Herald-Journal reported. The community is one of the city's poorest. SENT: 559 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-STORM GRATE TENDERS

CHARLESTON, S.C. _ A volunteer program where Charleston residents maintain clog-prone city drains has brought in a few dozen members since 2017, including members of the mayor’s family, a College of Charleston researcher, military veterans and a doctor. These guardians of the grates pluck leaves, sticks and dirt out of drains near their homes without the publicity of a highway sign or a placard for their service. By Mikaela Porter, The Post and Courier. AP Photo Pursuing.

IN BRIEF:

_ STABBED TO DEATH _ A woman has been killed with a butcher knife during an argument inside a South Carolina home.

_ GULLAH GEECHEE MEETING _The Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission is holding its next community meeting at a historical site near Wilmington, where members will hear updates on various projects in North Carolina.

IN SPORTS:

FBC--PICK SIX-TOUGHEST SCHEDULES

UNDATED _ South Carolina has the type of brutal schedule that could help the Gamecocks be a better team that winds up with a worse record than last year. The Gamecocks host both of the participants in last year's College Football Playoff championship game: Clemson and Alabama. They also travel to Georgia, the runner-up in the national championship game two years ago. By Steve Megargee. SENT: 909 words.

AP Photos NY156-0901181526, NY163-0909180007, LAGH105-0807190639, MICO202-0413192126, NY903-1028180153.

ALABAMA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

SLENDERCLAW CRAYFISH-ALABAMA

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. _ The slenderclaw crayfish is barely surviving in northern Alabama. The tiny animal is now known to survive in just two creeks near Sand Mountain, where they burrow under rocks in shallow, slow-moving waters, Al.com reported. SENT: 334 words.

CLEAR THE SHELTERS

OPELIKA, Ala. _ Humane societies in Alabama and Georgia are among many participating in this weekend's "Clear the Shelters" events. The events are aimed at finding owners for the animals. SENT: 246 words.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-STUDENTS-HEARING LOSS

MUSCLE SHOALS, Ala. _ They're as diverse in personality and talents as they can be, but they all have a major attribute in common — they're overcomers. Connor Reed, Jaylee Beth Smith and Riley Kimbrell are juniors at Muscle Shoals High School and all are hearing impaired. By Lisa Singleton-Rickman. TimesDaily. AP Photo.

IN BRIEF:

_ AFRICATOWN-DIVING PROGRAM _ There’s a new recreational program for young people in coastal Alabama who live in a community formed by freed slaves after the Civil War.

IN SPORTS:

FBC--PICK SIX-TOUGHEST SCHEDULES

UNDATED _ South Carolina has the type of brutal schedule that could help the Gamecocks be a better team that winds up with a worse record than last year. The Gamecocks host both of the participants in last year's College Football Playoff championship game: Clemson and Alabama. They also travel to Georgia, the runner-up in the national championship game two years ago. By Steve Megargee. SENT: 909 words.

AP Photos NY156-0901181526, NY163-0909180007, LAGH105-0807190639, MICO202-0413192126, NY903-1028180153.

FBC--OKLAHOMA-HURTS

NORMAN, Okla. _ Jalen Hurts has had all the answers since transferring from Alabama in January. One question had the new Oklahoma quarterback stumped. When asked what he does besides football and studying, he paused. By Cliff Brunt. SENT: 747 words.

AP Photos NY301-0413190150, OKSO103-0805190931, OKSO101-0805190922, OKSO102-0805190928, OKSO105-0802191130.

LOUISIANA (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

The following story is from “EXTRA: STATE OF EMERGENCY:” “State of Emergency,” an investigation into disaster response and recovery, is the 2019 project of the Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multimedia reporting project produced by the nation’s top journalism students and graduates. Each year, students selected into the program report in-depth on a single topic of national importance. Pieces of the project are available for use by AP members. Find all stories, photos and video at the project website: https://stateofemergency.news21.com as well as some individual stories in AP Newsroom.

CHILDREN OF KATRINA

OCEAN SPRINGS, Miss. — They were children and teens, their lives disrupted by death and decimation, and even the loss of the simplest things. For Shannon Lafferre, it was Scooby, a hermit crab, newly purchased on a trip with her father to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. For others it was baby books, photos, treasured gifts, all lost to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. For thousands more, it was school, health care, nutrition and the social-safety networks they had known all their lives. When Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast in August 2005, it laid bare the flaws in the nation’s disaster infrastructure. It also inspired new research into how disasters affect children, a group that had never been extensively studied. “It’s very traumatic for a child to lose their possessions, routines, friends and familiar surroundings,” said Alice Fothergill, professor of sociology at the University of Vermont and co-author of the book “Children of Katrina.” By Sophie Grosserode and Katie Hunger of Carnegie-Knight News21. With Photos.

NATIONAL GUARD GENERAL

PINEVILLE, La. _ The Louisiana National Guard's newest general is a high school assistant principal and sports coach in daily life. Damian "Keith" Waddell of Lake Charles was promoted to brigadier general Saturday recently at Camp Beauregard in Pineville, according to a news release. SENT: 193 words.

MISSISSIPPI-EYEBROW THREADING LAWSUIT

JACKSON, Miss. _ A group that advocates limited government is suing Mississippi over the state's licensing requirement for people who earn money by plucking eyebrows with thread. Mississippi Justice Institute filed the lawsuit Monday on behalf of Dipa Bhattarai, a University of Mississippi graduate student. She grew up in Nepal, where she learned the technique of using a single strand of cotton thread to remove hair. SENT: 577 words.

AP Photos MSJAD102-0808191412.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-CHARTER SCHOOL-EXPERIMENT

NEW ORLEANS _ Two decades ago, a group of frustrated New Orleans educators proposed a radical idea: start an open-enrollment charter school that would educate kids better by freeing the school from the bureaucracy of a poorly performing district. The response was overwhelming. In its first year, about 900 applications came pouring in for just 117 spots at the school they created, New Orleans Charter Middle School. By Della Hasselle. The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate.

EXCHANGE-GROCERY STORES

BATON ROUGE, La. _ In the span of a typical week, Courtney Bush will often visit three, sometimes four, different supermarkets to pick up groceries for her family. She'll make a run to Trader Joe's — closest to her home near the Perkins Road overpass — at least once a week for produce, frozen items and nut butters. Whole Foods is another weekly stop, where Bush buys items like rotisserie chicken, yogurt, healthy snacks and specialty foods like almond flour tortillas. By Annie Ourso Landry. Greater Baton Rouge Business Report. AP Photo.

IN BRIEF:

_ ELEVATION GRANTS _ Louisiana U.S. Rep. Garret Graves says Livingston Parish will receive a $5.3 million federal grant to fund the elevation of 88 homes that were substantially damaged during the 2016 flood.

MISSISSIPPI (All times Central)

TOP STORIES:

The following story is from “EXTRA: STATE OF EMERGENCY:” “State of Emergency,” an investigation into disaster response and recovery, is the 2019 project of the Carnegie-Knight News21 program, a national multimedia reporting project produced by the nation’s top journalism students and graduates. Each year, students selected into the program report in-depth on a single topic of national importance. Pieces of the project are available for use by AP members. Find all stories, photos and video at the project website: https://stateofemergency.news21.com as well as some individual stories in AP Newsroom.

CHILDREN OF KATRINA

OCEAN SPRINGS, Miss. _ They were children and teens, their lives disrupted by death and decimation, and even the loss of the simplest things. For Shannon Lafferre, it was Scooby, a hermit crab, newly purchased on a trip with her father to Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. For others it was baby books, photos, treasured gifts, all lost to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. For thousands more, it was school, health care, nutrition and the social-safety networks they had known all their lives. When Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast in August 2005, it laid bare the flaws in the nation’s disaster infrastructure. It also inspired new research into how disasters affect children, a group that had never been extensively studied. “It’s very traumatic for a child to lose their possessions, routines, friends and familiar surroundings,” said Alice Fothergill, professor of sociology at the University of Vermont and co-author of the book “Children of Katrina.” By Sophie Grosserode and Katie Hunger of Carnegie-Knight News21. With Photos.

MISSISSIPPI-EYEBROW THREADING LAWSUIT

JACKSON, Miss. _ A group that advocates limited government is suing Mississippi over the state's licensing requirement for people who earn money by plucking eyebrows with thread. Mississippi Justice Institute filed the lawsuit Monday on behalf of Dipa Bhattarai, a University of Mississippi graduate student. She grew up in Nepal, where she learned the technique of using a single strand of cotton thread to remove hair. SENT: 577 words.

AP Photos MSJAD102-0808191412.

AP MEMBER EXCHANGES:

EXCHANGE-SCHOOL-YEAR-BEGINS

TUPELO, Miss. _ Tayvian McPherson's "Sonic the Hedgehog" backpack was the talk of Kelly Hutcheson's kindergarten classroom at Carver Elementary School Wednesday (Aug. 7) morning. As new and returning students filled the school, there was a fair share of laughter and tears in the hallways from entering children and departing parents — but in Hutcheson's class, McPherson was holding court. By W. Derek Russell. The Daily Journal.

EXCHANGE-HEAT-STREET PERFORMER

STARKVILLE, Miss. _ On what was likely to be the hottest day of the year Tuesday (Aug. 13), the pops of a snare and beat of a bass drum echoed through the open air on Lynn Lane near Starkville Academy. While musical street performers might be commonplace in destination cities like New Orleans and Memphis, the sight of a lone drummer banging away in the middle of a field is naturally not a common spectacle. That isn't stopping 20-year-old Tahj Mckey, though. By Ryan Phillips. The Starkville Daily News.

IN BRIEF:

_ OLE MISS-CAMPUS RECREATION _ The University of Mississippi will open a new $32 million campus recreation center later this month.

_ ENTERTAINMENT MUSEUM-RECORDING STUDIO _ A new recording studio has opened at a museum called The Mississippi Arts + Entertainment Experience.

____

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The Atlanta AP Bureau: apatlanta@ap.org

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The Jackson AP Bureau: jkme@ap.org

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