Ice is displayed at the Variety Store on Thursday, July 27, 2017, on Ocracoke Island on North Carolina's Outer Banks. An estimated 10,000 tourists were ordered Thursday to evacuate the island after a construction company caused a power outage, leaving people stranded without air conditioning or places to eat. (C. Leinbach/Ocracoke Observer via AP)

The Latest: Emergency on powerless North Carolina islands

July 28, 2017 - 8:14 am

BUXTON, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on power loss on two North Carolina islands (all times local):

8:15 a.m.

A state of emergency has been issued for two islands on North Carolina's Outer Banks after a construction company cut an electrical line.

Gov. Roy Cooper signed the declaration for Hatteras and Ocracoke islands Thursday night.

Cooper says the declaration removes restrictions on weight and the hours of service for fuel, utility and other truck drivers that may be working to deliver supplies and other resources needed to restore power.

Crews were working to determine how severe the damage was when a construction crew working on a new bridge cut the power line to the islands Thursday morning. It could take several days or several weeks to repair.

Hyde County officials issued mandatory evacuation orders for Ocracoke Island. Officials hope all visitors will be off the island by noon Friday.

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3:10 a.m.

An estimated 10,000 tourists have been ordered to evacuate an island on North Carolina's Outer Banks after a construction company caused a power outage, leaving people stranded without air conditioning or places to eat.

The evacuation order issued for visitors to Ocracoke Island in Hyde County went into effect at 5 p.m. Thursday. Officials say no one will be allowed onto the island unless they can prove residency.

Hyde County public information officer Donnie Shumate says there are some 10,000 visitors on the island. He said the main concern was for their safety, adding that officials want to get visitors off the island by noon Friday. The outage comes during peak tourist season, which runs from mid-June through Labor Day.

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