Update on the latest news, sports, business and entertainment:

March 11, 2017 - 6:17 am

TRUMP TRAVEL BAN-WASHINGTON

Federal judge not ready to rule on blocking new travel ban

SEATTLE (AP) — A federal judge in Seattle who issued the order halting nationwide implementation of President Donald Trump's initial travel ban says he won't immediately rule on whether his restraining order applies to the new travel ban because of procedural reasons.

U.S. District Judge James Robart said in an order Friday that motions or a complaint over the revised ban need to be filed before he can make a decision. The states of Washington and Minnesota, as well as the Justice Department, have only filed notices.

Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson said on Twitter he is reviewing the order with his legal team to determine next steps.

Trump's revised ban bars new visas for people from six predominantly Muslim countries: Somalia, Iran, Syria, Sudan, Libya and Yemen. It also temporarily shuts down the U.S. refugee program.

The travel ban is scheduled to go into effect Thursday.

HEALTH CARE

Conservatives raise objection to House proposal, Trump supports it

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is continuing to push the embattled House GOP health care plan.

In his weekly address on Saturday, he said he wants every American to know that action on the Obama health care law is an "urgent necessity."

He says, "The law is collapsing around us," and that millions of Americans will be "hurt and badly hurt" if nothing is done.

Trump says the plan put forward by House Republicans satisfies the goals he laid out in his recent speech to Congress.

But conservative Republicans are demanding tougher changes in insurance requirements and Medicaid than the House bill proposes and warn they'll oppose the legislation if it isn't reshaped.

The White House has signaled an openness to negotiate, but there is resistance from House leaders.

HEALTH OVERHAUL-PENCE

Pence to make case for health care overhaul in Kentucky

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence is set to rally support in Kentucky for a White House-backed health care overhaul.

He'll be traveling Saturday to a state that has often been front-and-center in the battle over former President Barack Obama's sweeping health care law.

In Louisville, Pence is scheduled to tour an energy services company with Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin. The event is part of an effort to reassure conservative Republicans who have raised objections to the House GOP health care proposal that would scrap "Obamacare."

Pence has been the chief salesman for President Donald Trump's push to repeal and replace Obama's health care law. The House is expected to vote on the bill in less than two weeks but faces fierce resistance from critics, including Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky.

GERMANY-ATTACK THREAT

German police order mall to stay closed after attack threat

BERLIN (AP) — Police have ordered a shopping mall in the western German city of Essen not to open after receiving credible tips of an imminent attack.

The shopping center and the adjacent parking lot stayed closed Saturday morning as over a hundred police officers searched the compound.

The German news agency dpa reported that the downtown mall, one of the biggest in the region, would be closed for the entire day.

Police in Essen could not immediately be reached for more details.

VOTING RIGHTS-TEXAS

UPDATE: Federal court finds Texas gerrymandered maps on racial lines

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal court has dealt Texas another loss over voting rights, finding that Republicans racially gerrymandered some congressional districts to weaken the electoral influence of the state's booming minority population.

The ruling late Friday by a three-judge panel in San Antonio gave Democrats hope of new voting maps that could give them more seats in Congress. But the 2-1 decision didn't mandate an immediate fix and Texas could appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

Republicans currently hold two of the three congressional districts ruled newly invalid. The maps were originally drawn by the GOP-controlled Texas Legislature in 2011.

Texas that year also passed a voter ID law that ranks among the toughest in the nation but has since been weakened by court rulings.

MALAYSIA-NORTH KOREA

NEW: Malaysia hopes for talks with North Korea in 'next few days'

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's foreign minister says the government hopes to begin formal talks with North Korea in the "next few days" on solving a diplomatic dispute that has seen the two countries bar each other's citizens from leaving.

The dispute stems from the mysterious poisoning death of the half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Feb. 13 at Kuala Lumpur's airport. Malaysia says Kim Jong Nam died after two women smeared his face with the banned VX nerve agent, but North Korea — which is widely suspected to be behind the attack — rejects the findings.

On Tuesday, both countries announced they were barring each other's citizens from leaving.

Malaysian Foreign Minister Anifah Aman said Saturday that both sides are ready to launch talks.

CONGO-UN CHIEF

NEW: UN chief seeks more police for Congo mission as violence up

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The United Nations secretary-general is seeking 320 additional police for the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Congo as tensions over long-delayed elections have caused violence to spread into new areas of the country.

The new report by Antonio Guterres to the U.N. Security Council, obtained by The Associated Press, says a recent political agreement reached by the ruling party and opposition to hold presidential elections this year is in peril as the sides engage in brinksmanship.

The vast Central African nation has seen widespread anger over President Joseph Kabila's stay in power after his mandate ended in December. The government has delayed elections, saying preparations are not complete.

The U.N. chief's report says additional police for the peacekeeping mission will help "keep the political process on track."

SYRIA

NEW: Syria's Assad says priority is capturing IS capital Raqqa

BEIRUT (AP) — Syria's President Bashar Assad tells a Chinese TV station that his military's priority is to reach the Islamic State group's de-facto capital of Raqqa — toward which U.S.-backed Kurdish-led forces are also advancing.

The interview with Hong-Kong based Phoenix TV aired Saturday, Assad says another IS stronghold, Deir el-Zour, can be targeted in parallel.

Assad says "in theory" he shares the same priority with U.S. President Donald Trump of fighting terrorism, but that they have had no formal contact yet. He says Russia, a major ally, hopes it can bring the U.S. and Turkey into cooperating with Moscow and Damascus in the fight against terrorism in Syria. Assad's government views all armed opposition as terrorist groups.

Assad says all foreign troops on Syrian soil without invitation or consultation with the Syrian government are considered "invaders."

MALAYSIA-NORTH KOREA

Malaysia hopes for talks with North Korea in 'next few days'

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's foreign minister says the government hopes to begin formal talks with North Korea in the "next few days" on solving a diplomatic dispute that has seen the two countries bar each other's citizens from leaving.

The dispute stems from the mysterious poisoning death of the half brother of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un on Feb. 13 at Kuala Lumpur's airport. Malaysia says Kim Jong Nam died after two women smeared his face with the banned VX nerve agent, but North Korea — which is widely suspected to be behind the attack — rejects the findings.

On Tuesday, both countries announced they were barring each other's citizens from leaving.

Malaysian Foreign Minister Anifah Aman said Saturday that both sides are ready to launch talks.

CONGO-UN CHIEF

UN chief seeks more police for Congo mission as violence up

JOHANNESBURG (AP) — The United Nations secretary-general is seeking 320 additional police for the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Congo as tensions over long-delayed elections have caused violence to spread into new areas of the country.

The new report by Antonio Guterres to the U.N. Security Council, obtained by The Associated Press, says a recent political agreement reached by the ruling party and opposition to hold presidential elections this year is in peril as the sides engage in brinksmanship.

The vast Central African nation has seen widespread anger over President Joseph Kabila's stay in power after his mandate ended in December. The government has delayed elections, saying preparations are not complete.

The U.N. chief's report says additional police for the peacekeeping mission will help "keep the political process on track."

SYRIA

Syria's Assad says priority is capturing IS capital Raqqa

BEIRUT (AP) — Syria's President Bashar Assad tells a Chinese TV station that his military's priority is to reach the Islamic State group's de-facto capital of Raqqa — toward which U.S.-backed Kurdish-led forces are also advancing.

The interview with Hong-Kong based Phoenix TV aired Saturday, Assad says another IS stronghold, Deir el-Zour, can be targeted in parallel.

Assad says "in theory" he shares the same priority with U.S. President Donald Trump of fighting terrorism, but that they have had no formal contact yet. He says Russia, a major ally, hopes it can bring the U.S. and Turkey into cooperating with Moscow and Damascus in the fight against terrorism in Syria. Assad's government views all armed opposition as terrorist groups.

Assad says all foreign troops on Syrian soil without invitation or consultation with the Syrian government are considered "invaders."

REPUBLICANS-CONSUMER PROTECTION CHIEF

Ohio Dems see edge if Trump tells agency head 'you're fired'

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are urging President Donald Trump to fire the head of the nation's primary consumer protection agency, and some Ohio Democrats focused on next year's race for governor say go for it.

Richard Cordray is the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, created in 2010 in the wake of the worst financial crisis since the Depression. Cordray is extremely unpopular with some congressional Republicans who consider the agency's structure as unconstitutional even though it's meant to enhance its independence.

Any firing of Cordray would likely result in litigation. It would also give the little-known government official an opening to run for governor in his home state of Ohio, where some Democrats would view being fired by Trump as a badge of honor.

MATTIS-ALONE AT TOP

After 2 months, Mattis is only Trump pick at Pentagon

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is not lonely in the Pentagon, but two months into his tenure not a single political appointee has joined him.

The retired Marine general has sparred with the White House over choices for high-priority civilian positions that, while rarely visible to the public, are key to developing and implementing defense policy at home and abroad.

When the Obama administration closed shop in January, only one of its top-tier Pentagon political appointees stayed. The deputy defense secretary, Robert Work, agreed to remain until his successor was in place. No nominee for deputy has been announced, let alone confirmed by the Senate.

So far the administration has announced four nominees for senior Pentagon civilian jobs, and two of those later withdrew.

SPRING FORWARD

Time marches on, with a little bit more skip this weekend

WASHINGTON (AP) — Time marches on, with a bit more skip this weekend.

Daylight saving time officially re-emerges at 2 a.m. local time Sunday for most of the United States, so it's best to advance your clocks by 60 minutes before bed.

You'll lose an hour's sleep Saturday night, but gain more evening light in the months ahead, when the weather warms and you want to be outdoors.

No time change is observed in Hawaii, most of Arizona, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Marianas.

Standard time returns Nov. 5.

The Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology says daylight saving time covers 238 days, or about 65 percent of the year.

SPORTS COMPLEX SHOOTING-THE LATEST

Court files: Man shot by police had violent past

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Court records show a California man who was shot and killed by police after he reportedly chased children at a sport complex had a violent past.

The records show Steven Schiltz's mother, Angela Hernandez, sought and obtained a restraining order for her son in 2013 after reporting he had threatened relatives with a baseball bat, pool sticks and other items.

Hernandez wrote that he drank, used drugs, made holes in walls and talked about killing himself and his family.

In 2015, Schiltz pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of making criminal threats by threatening to kill someone.

Authorities say police shot and killed the 29-year-old Schiltz on Thursday at the complex in Huntington Beach after he made a move toward a woman in the bleachers. His mother says police used excessive force.

A girls' soccer coach who put himself between his players and a wild-eyed man wielding what looked like a broken wine bottle at a California sports complex says police had no choice but to shoot the man.

ST PATRICK'S PARADE-GAYS

Lawyer says gay group reviewing parade letter

BOSTON (AP) — A lawyer for a group of gay veterans initially barred from marching in Boston's St. Patrick's Day parade says the group has received a letter allowing it to march and is "actively reviewing" it.

Organizers of this year's parade reversed course Friday and said they will allow the group of gay veterans to march. Parade organizers tweeted an "acceptance letter" had been signed by the South Boston Allied War Veterans Council that would allow OutVets to take part in the March 19 parade.

The decision earlier this week to bar OutVets from marching drew immediate condemnation from high-profile politicians and stirred up a furor on social media.

OutVets was first allowed to participate in the parade in 2015.

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