Hurricane Sally Makes Landfall in Same Spot, Exactly 16 Years Later, as Hurricane Ivan

Eldis Sula
September 16, 2020 - 6:15 pm

As local residents braced for impact, Hurricane Sally touched down on land in Alabama on Wednesday morning.

But what locals didn’t expect is that, despite being hurricane season, Sally made landfall in the same spot, exactly 16 years to the day later, as Hurricane Ivan, which also struck Gulf Shores in 2004.

A rescue worker sends a dog to search for survivors into the wreckage of a condominium destroyed by Hurricane Ivan September 17, 2004 in Orange Beach, Alabama
A rescue worker sends a dog to search for survivors into the wreckage of a condominium destroyed by Hurricane Ivan September 17, 2004 in Orange Beach, Alabama Photo credit Getty Images

Both hurricanes reached land only about 15 miles apart, reports CNN.

In addition to the same day and location, the two hurricanes shared nearly the same time of reaching land — Sally arrived just before 6am, while Ivan hit the shores at 3am on that early September 2004 morning.

Despite the similarities — which extend even to the storms’ similar tracks — one crucial difference is the speed of the hurricanes.

On Sept. 16, 2004, Ivan pummeled the area, rapidly scouring the area with landfall winds of 13 mph.

Sally, on the other hand, only hit land at about 2 mph.

When it hit, Ivan was catastrophic, responsible for 57 deaths in the U.S. and causing $27 billion in damage in the country, reports Pensacola News Journal.

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