Addiction treatment

In this Sunday, Oct. 20, 2019 photo, Rev. William Tourigny, 66, pastor of St. Rose de Lima Parish, in Chicopee, Mass., arranges vestments while preparing to offer Mass at the Catholic church. When Tourigny was ordained in 1980, the Springfield diocese had more than 300 priests serving 136 parishes. Since then, the ranks of priests have shrunk by more than half and nearly 60 of the parishes have closed. For Tourigny, it's meant many more funerals to handle, including dozens related to drug overdoses and heavy drinking. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)
December 09, 2019 - 1:13 pm
CHICOPEE, Mass. (AP) — More than a century ago, waves of Catholic immigrants from Ireland, Poland and Quebec settled in Chicopee and other western Massachusetts mill towns, helping build churches, rectories and schools to accommodate their faith. Today the priests leading those churches are under...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, June 19, 2018 file photo Cheryl Juaire walks past a photo of her son, Corey Merrill, at her home in Marlborough, Mass. Victims of opioid addiction weren’t in the room when big decisions were hammered out in OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma’s proposal to settle claims over its role in the U.S. opioid crisis. Cheryl Juaire lost her 23-year-old son to a heroin overdose after he became addicted to prescription painkillers. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
October 06, 2019 - 3:50 pm
Victims of opioid addiction weren't in the room when OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma persuaded half the state attorneys general to settle claims over the company's role in the nationwide overdose epidemic. Now that Purdue is in federal bankruptcy court, four people whose lives were touched by...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2018, file photo, Lynn Wencus of Wrentham, Mass., holds a sign with a picture of her son Jeff and wears a sign of others' loved ones lost to OxyContin and other opioids during a protest at Purdue Pharma LLP headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Some of the money in Purdue Pharma’s proposed multibillion-dollar opioid settlement would come from the continued sale of opioids. “It’s blood money paying for blood money,” said Wencus. “It’s ludicrous. The whole thing would be almost comical if we weren’t talking about human lives here.” (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
September 17, 2019 - 4:42 pm
The tentative multibillion-dollar settlement with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma would raise money to help clean up the opioid mess by ... selling more OxyContin. That would amount to blood money, in the opinion of some critics. And it's one reason two dozen states have rejected the deal. "The...
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Judge Thad Balkman announces his decision in the Opioid Lawsuit In Norman, Okla., Monday, Aug. 26, 2019. Balkman found Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiaries helped fuel the state's opioid drug crisis and ordered the consumer products giant to pay $572 million to help abate the problem in the coming years. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, Pool)
August 27, 2019 - 7:01 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma's legal fight against the opioid industry has racked up settlements and judgments of nearly $1 billion, but as the numbers keep rising, so do concerns over how that money will be spent. Experts say the $572 million judgment issued Monday against consumer products giant...
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FILE - In this March 13, 2019 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal health officials are proposing to update 1970s-era patient confidentiality rules to encourage coordination among medical professionals treating people caught up in the nation’s opioid epidemic. The idea is to make it easier to share a patient’s drug treatment history with doctors treating that person for other problems. That can stave off serious errors, such as unwittingly prescribing opioid painkillers to someone with a past history of dependence. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
August 22, 2019 - 4:16 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials proposed Thursday to revamp stringent patient confidentiality regulations from the 1970s to encourage coordination among medical professionals treating people caught in the nation's opioid epidemic. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said the...
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FILE - In this March 13, 2019 file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar testifies before a House Appropriations subcommittee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Federal health officials are proposing to update 1970s-era patient confidentiality rules to encourage coordination among medical professionals treating people caught up in the nation’s opioid epidemic. The idea is to make it easier to share a patient’s drug treatment history with doctors treating that person for other problems. That can stave off serious errors, such as unwittingly prescribing opioid painkillers to someone with a past history of dependence. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
August 22, 2019 - 4:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal health officials are proposing to revamp stringent patient confidentiality rules from the 1970s to encourage coordination among medical professionals treating people caught in the nation's opioid epidemic. The idea is to make it easier to share a patient's drug treatment...
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FILE - In this March 1, 2016, file photo, San Francisco police officers wait while homeless people collect their belongings in San Francisco. San Francisco supervisors consider legislation Tuesday, June 4, 2019, allowing the city to force mentally ill drug addicts into housing and treatment for up to a year. Mayor London Breed says it's inhumane to let addicts languish on the streets, but homeless advocates say the measure is extreme and a violation of civil rights. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
June 04, 2019 - 9:06 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco officials decided Tuesday to force some people with serious mental illness and drug addiction into treatment, even if it goes against the spirit of a city known for its fierce protection of civil rights. Several members of the Board of Supervisors voiced deep...
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FILE - In this April 27, 2019, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., right, speaks at a Service Employees International Union forum on labor issues in Las Vegas. Klobuchar has released a plan to spend $100 billion over a decade to improve mental health care and fight substance abuse. It’s an issue the Minnesota senator has faced firsthand as the daughter of an alcoholic who struggled with addiction for years before getting sober.(AP Photo/John Locher, File)
May 03, 2019 - 5:23 am
CHICAGO (AP) — Democratic presidential candidate Amy Klobuchar has released a plan to spend $100 billion over a decade to improve mental health care and fight substance abuse, an issue the Minnesota senator has faced firsthand as the daughter of an alcoholic who struggled with addiction for years...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2019, file photo, is Oklahoma Attorney General Mike Hunter smiles during an interview in Oklahoma City. The Oklahoma Supreme Court has denied a request by drugmakers to postpone the trial in the state's lawsuit accusing them of fueling the opioid epidemic. The state's highest court handed down the decision Monday, a week after attorneys for drugmakers and the state made oral presentations on the request to delay the trial's scheduled May 28 start. Hunter sued 13 opioid manufacturers in 2017, alleging they fraudulently engaged in marketing campaigns that led to thousands of overdose addictions and deaths. Several states have filed similar lawsuits, but Oklahoma's is expected to be the first to go to trial. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
March 26, 2019 - 3:25 pm
TULSA, Okla. (AP) — The Latest on Oklahoma's lawsuit against manufacturers of opioid pain medications (all times local): 2:20 p.m. The maker of OxyContin and the family that owns the company are touting their settlement with Oklahoma as a way to make a difference in the fight against addiction. In...
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October 05, 2018 - 8:45 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ben Affleck says battling addiction is "a lifelong and difficult struggle." The actor posted on Instagram Thursday that he has completed a 40-day stay at a treatment center for alcohol addiction and remains in outpatient care. The 46-year-old says the support he's received from...
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