African-Americans

FILE - In this April 26, 2019, file photo, former Minneapolis police officer Mohamed Noor walks to court in Minneapolis. Attorneys for Noor, convicted of fatally shooting an unarmed woman in 2017, plan to ask a sentencing judge for no prison time. If that's not granted, they're seeking less prison time than state sentencing guidelines recommend. Noor's lawyers filed a motion Thursday, May 30 asking for a "dispositional departure" when he is sentenced June 7 for third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter in the fatal shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond who had called 911 to report a possible crime. (Leila Navidi/Star Tribune via AP, File)
June 06, 2019 - 5:38 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Attorneys for a Minneapolis police officer convicted of murder in the fatal shooting of an unarmed woman who had called 911 are asking a judge not to send him to prison but instead require him to report to a county detention facility each year of his probation on the woman's...
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FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2011, file photo, a correctional officer works at one of the housing units at Pelican Bay State Prison near Crescent City, Calif. Federal prosecutors say leaders of a notorious white supremacist gang have been charged with directing killings and drug smuggling from within California's most secure prisons. The charges unsealed Thursday, June 6, 2019, detail five slayings and accuse an attorney of helping smuggle drugs and cell phones. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
June 06, 2019 - 3:50 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Leaders of the Aryan Brotherhood prison gang were charged Thursday with directing killings and drug smuggling from within California's most secure prisons, U.S. prosecutors said. The charges detail five slayings and accuse an attorney of helping smuggle drugs and...
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In this Saturday, June 1, 2019 photo, a passing bicyclist pauses to watch supporters of Denver Mayor Michael Hancock as they pause for a picture during a rally for the incumbent in Denver. Hancock, who is seeking his third, four-year term as mayor, is facing Jamie Giellis in a runoff Tuesday. (AP Photo/James Anderson)
June 05, 2019 - 3:45 am
DENVER (AP) — Denver Mayor Michael Hancock claimed victory in his bid for a third term in a runoff election Tuesday, crediting his challenger, Jamie Giellis, for running a spirited campaign that forced a feisty debate over the impacts of rapid urban development and focused attention on the city's...
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FILE - In this March 1, 2016, file photo, San Francisco police officers wait while homeless people collect their belongings in San Francisco. San Francisco supervisors consider legislation Tuesday, June 4, 2019, allowing the city to force mentally ill drug addicts into housing and treatment for up to a year. Mayor London Breed says it's inhumane to let addicts languish on the streets, but homeless advocates say the measure is extreme and a violation of civil rights. (AP Photo/Ben Margot, File)
June 04, 2019 - 9:06 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco officials decided Tuesday to force some people with serious mental illness and drug addiction into treatment, even if it goes against the spirit of a city known for its fierce protection of civil rights. Several members of the Board of Supervisors voiced deep...
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Minnesota Vikings chief operating officer Kevin Warren talks to reporters after being named Big Ten Conference Commissioner during a news conference Tuesday, June 4, 2019, in Rosemont, Ill. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)
June 04, 2019 - 6:23 pm
ROSEMONT, Ill. (AP) — Kevin Warren keeps a picture in his office of Curt Flood. There's another of Jackie Robinson, one of Texas Western's barrier-bulldozing 1966 NCAA championship basketball team and Dr. Martin Luther King's letter from "Letter from Birmingham Jail." Warren understood the...
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In this Monday, June 3, 2019, photo, Orange County Commissioner Emily Bonilla looks at a map of Orange County and the city of Orlando in Orlando, Fla. Bonilla is worried her district in metro Orlando will be undercounted during next spring's once-in-a-decade head count of everybody in the United States because of who lives there: new arrivals, immigrants, the poor, renters and people living in rural areas who sometimes regard government with suspicion. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
June 04, 2019 - 6:51 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Emily Bonilla is worried her district in metro Orlando will be undercounted during next spring's once-in-a-decade head count of everybody in the United States because of who lives there: new arrivals, immigrants, the poor, renters and rural residents who sometimes regard...
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June 04, 2019 - 1:57 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Dr. Patricia Bath, a pioneering ophthalmologist who became the first African American female doctor to receive a medical patent after she invented a more precise treatment of cataracts, has died. She was 76. Bath died on May 30 from complications of cancer at a University of...
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In this Saturday, June 1, 2019 photo, a passing bicyclist pauses to watch supporters of Denver Mayor Michael Hancock as they pause for a picture during a rally for the incumbent in Denver. Hancock, who is seeking his third, four-year term as mayor, is facing Jamie Giellis in a runoff Tuesday. (AP Photo/James Anderson)
June 03, 2019 - 5:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — A campaign for Denver mayor that culminates with a runoff on Tuesday has been dominated by feisty debate over how to manage a decade-long economic and population boom that has transformed the face of the city. The officially nonpartisan election pits two-term incumbent Michael Hancock...
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May 30, 2019 - 7:16 pm
Good evening! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
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FILE - In this April 3, 2019 file photo, former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr. speaks during the National Action Network Convention in New York. A new federal lawsuit being filed Thursday, May 30 by three African American residents of Mississippi seeks to block what it calls the state’s racist method of electing the governor and other statewide officials. The lawsuit takes aim at Mississippi’s unique requirement that candidates for statewide office must win both a majority of the popular vote and at least 62 of the 122 state House of Representatives districts. Holder said a judge could order Mississippi to do what most states already do - “count all the votes and the person who gets the greatest number of votes wins.” (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)
May 30, 2019 - 5:13 pm
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — In 1890, as white politicians across the South cracked down on the black population with Jim Crow laws, Mississippi inserted into its constitution an unusually high bar for getting elected governor or winning any other statewide office. The provision, which remains in force to...
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