Agricultural science

June 11, 2020 - 10:48 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A soil scientist whose research led to improved food production and a better understanding of how atmospheric carbon can be held in the soil to help combat climate change was named this year’s recipient of the World Food Prize on Thursday. Rattan Lal is a professor of soil...
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This undated photo provided by the Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab shows two humpback whales in the Antarctic. Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study released on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019 says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. (Duke Marine Robotics and Remote Sensing Lab via AP)
December 14, 2019 - 9:00 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Whales are big, but why aren't they bigger? A new study says it's basically about how many calories they can take in. That's the conclusion of researchers who used small boats to chase down 300 whales of various species around the world. They reached out with a long pole to attach...
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FILE - In this June 13, 2012, file photo, Asian carp, jolted by an electric current from a research boat, jump from the Illinois River near Havana, Ill. A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread far and wide. Some experts have questioned whether there’s enough plankton in the lake to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. But the new report released Monday, Aug. 12, 2019, by University of Michigan scientists says despite a drop-off of plankton caused by exotic mussels, the voracious carp could feed on other organic material when venturing into deeper waters. (AP Photo/John Flesher, File)
August 12, 2019 - 2:42 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Asian carp are likely to find enough food to spread farther if they establish breeding populations in Lake Michigan, reinforcing the importance of preventing the invasive fish from gaining a foothold, scientists said in a paper released Monday. A study led by University...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2019, file photo, the sun sets in Cuggiono near Milan, Italy. A new U.N. report on warming and land use says climate change is hitting us where it counts: the stomach. The scientific report on Thursday, Aug. 8, finds that as the world warms it degrades the land more. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno, File)
August 08, 2019 - 9:14 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on a new United Nations report on climate change (all times local): 3:10 p.m. A manager in the U.N. Climate Change secretariat who helped write a new report on the subject, said the grueling work by the volunteer authors was "like a dentist's appointment for six days"...
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FILE - In a Thursday, March 3, 2016 file photo, Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain sits in the Senate Finance Committee ahead of a hearing in Baton Rouge, La. Louisiana's first medical marijuana products are one step away from pharmacies, with final testing planned for this week. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain, whose department oversees the therapeutic cannabis program, said if the product collected Monday, July 29, 2019 from GB Sciences is free of contaminants, medical marijuana could reach patients early next week. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte, File)
August 01, 2019 - 8:43 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Medical marijuana is expected to start reaching select dispensaries in Louisiana on Tuesday, after the state agriculture department completed final testing and cleared therapeutic cannabis for release to patients. Agriculture Commissioner Mike Strain announced Thursday...
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July 16, 2019 - 4:37 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — German pharmaceutical giant Bayer AG is closing its crop science division headquarters in North Carolina and moving 500 jobs to the St. Louis area, Missouri Gov. Mike Parson and a company executive announced Tuesday. Lisa Safarian, Bayer's commercial operations-North...
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Peter Bowyer, the facility manager at AquaBounty Technologies, holds one of the last batch of conventional Atlantic salmon raised at the commercial fish farm in Albany, Ind., Wednesday, June 19, 2019. AquaBounty will be producing the first genetically modified animals approved for human food in the U.S. and one way companies are pushing to transform plants and animals, as consumer advocacy groups call for greater caution. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
June 21, 2019 - 1:11 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Inside an Indiana aquafarming complex, thousands of salmon eggs genetically modified to grow faster than normal are hatching into tiny fish. After growing to roughly 10 pounds (4.5 kilograms) in indoor tanks, they could be served in restaurants by late next year. The salmon produced...
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This Friday, May 24, 2019 photo shows the "sell by" date for a jug of milk in New York. In May 2019, U.S. regulators are again urging food makers to reduce the variety of terms like "best by" and "use by" that cause confusion about when food should be thrown out. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
June 06, 2019 - 9:19 am
NEW YORK (AP) — If milk is a few days past its "Sell By" date, is it safe to drink? U.S. regulators are urging food-makers to be more consistent with labeling terms like "Best By" and "Enjoy By" that cause confusion. By clarifying the meaning of such dates, they are trying to prevent people from...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Monday, June 3, 2019. The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 03, 2019 - 2:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2018, file photo, a couple walks through a forest with the Frankfurt skyline in background near Frankfurt, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
May 07, 2019 - 10:30 am
You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is in trouble, estimated 1 million species are...
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