Alternative and sustainable energy

Greta Thunberg, a 16-year-old climate activist from Sweden, sits on a catamaran docked in Hampton, Va., on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019. Thunberg will leave North America and begin her return trip across the Atlantic on Wednesday aboard a 48-foot (15-meter) catamaran sailboat whose passengers include an 11-month-old baby. The boat leaves little to no carbon footprint, boasting solar panels and a hydro-generators for power. (AP Photo/Ben Finley)
November 13, 2019 - 7:07 am
PARIS (AP) — The world's thirst for oil will continue to grow until the 2030s, with climate-damaging emissions climbing until at least 2040 — and consumers' insatiable appetite for SUVs is a big reason why. Mounting demand for plastic is another factor. So is increasing plane travel. And the...
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FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, Francesca Siena holds a photo of Mount Rainier and the Port of Tacoma that has been computer modified to include the image of a refinery as she protests in Tacoma, Wash., outside a public meeting to gather opinion on a proposed methanol plant that would be built at the Port of Tacoma. A new federal lawsuit filed Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2019, aims to kill plans to build one of the world's biggest methanol refineries along the Columbia River. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
November 12, 2019 - 6:12 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A federal lawsuit filed Tuesday aims to keep one of the world's biggest methanol refineries from being built along the Columbia River in Washington state. Plans for the $2 billion refinery, shipping terminal and pipeline project in the small city of Kalama are already stalled after a...
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FILE - In this Oct. 10, 2019, file photo, Pacific Gas & Electric employees work in the PG&E Emergency Operations Center in San Francisco. Experts say it’s hard to know what might have happened had the power stayed on, or if the utility’s proactive shutoffs are to thank for California’s mild fire season this year. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu, File)
October 14, 2019 - 11:48 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Millions of Californians spent part of the week in the dark in an unprecedented effort by the state's large electrical utilities to prevent another devastating wildfire. It was the fifth time Pacific Gas & Electric Co. has preemptively cut the power but by far the largest...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 5:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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Strong Santa Ana winds in Chatsworth, Calif., blew across power lines causing them to arc and transformers to explode. Power was out for street signs, businesses and residents along Devonshire St. from Topanga Canyon Blvd. to Variel Ave. on Thursday, Oct. 10, 2019. (Dean Musgrove/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 10, 2019 - 11:18 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Even as the winds gusted dangerously as forecast, California's biggest utility faced hostility and second-guessing Thursday for shutting off electricity to millions of people to prevent its equipment from sparking wildfires. Gov. Gavin Newsom criticized Pacific Gas & Electric...
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Nobel chemistry winner John B. Goodenough poses for the media at the Royal Society in London, Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. The 2019 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to John B. Goodenough, M. Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino for the development of lithium-ion batteries. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)
October 09, 2019 - 1:40 pm
STOCKHOLM (AP) — If you're reading this on a cellphone or laptop computer, you might thank this year's three winners of the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their work on lithium-ion batteries. The batteries developed by the British, American and Japanese winners are far more revolutionary than just...
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October 08, 2019 - 5:27 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — The Little Colorado River cuts across the northeast corner of Arizona, emptying its waters into the much-larger Colorado River after a more than 330-mile journey. Few people wander in the remote region where it crosses the Navajo Nation, aside from river rafters traveling...
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FILE - In this July 26, 2013, file photo, a motorist fills up with gasoline containing ethanol in Des Moines. The Trump administration says Friday, Oct. 4, 2019, it plans to implement new rules that will increase demand for ethanol, reversing a decline caused by exemptions given to oil refineries. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)
October 04, 2019 - 2:09 pm
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The Trump administration announced Friday it plans to implement new rules that will increase demand for ethanol, reversing a decline caused by exemptions given to oil refineries. The proposal follows months of complaints by Midwest farmers, politicians and the ethanol...
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In this Aug. 21, 2019 photo, instructor Chris Powicki speaks during an interview at Cape Cod Community College in West Barnstable, Mass. Powicki's Offshore Wind 101 classes have drawn nuclear and marina workers, engineers, young people and others hoping for good-paying wind jobs as an alternative to tourism jobs. But as Trump has made clear how much he hates wind turbines, all the offshore wind projects, including the nation's first utility-scale offshore wind project, an 84 turbine, $2.8 billion wind farm slated to rise 15 miles off Martha's Vineyard, have stalled. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
September 30, 2019 - 3:24 pm
BLOCK ISLAND, R.I. (AP) — The winds are blowing fair for America's wind power industry, making it one of the fastest-growing U.S. energy sources. Land-based turbines are rising by the thousands across America, from the remote Texas plains to farm towns of Iowa. And the U.S. wind boom now is...
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FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2014, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown, front right, and China's National Development and Reform Commission Vice Chairman Xie Zhenhua, front left, sign an agreement to boost bilateral cooperation on climate change during a news conference at the Bay Area Council, in San Francisco. As tensions between China and the United States ratchet up, former California Gov. Jerry Brown sees a way to bring together the world's largest carbon emitter and a U.S. state that's leading the way in energy standards: climate change. (AP Photo/Beck Diefenbach,file)
September 23, 2019 - 3:57 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — As tensions between China and the United States ratchet up, former California Gov. Jerry Brown sees a way to bring together the world's largest carbon emitter and a U.S. state that's leading the way in energy standards: climate change. Brown and Xie Zhenhua, China's top...
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