Animal population control

This August 2019 photo released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA) shows northern fur seal pups standing on a beach on Bogoslof Island, Alaska. Alaska's northern fur seals are thriving on an island that's the tip of an active undersea volcano. Numbers of fur seals continue to grow on tiny Bogoslof Island despite hot mud, steam and sulfurous gases spitting from vents on the volcano. (Maggie Mooney-Seus/NOAA Fisheries via AP)
October 03, 2019 - 1:17 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Alaska’s northern fur seal population for three decades has been classified as depleted, but the marine mammals are showing up in growing numbers at an unlikely location _ a tiny island that forms the tip of an active undersea volcano. Vents on Bogoslof Island continue to...
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FILE - In this June 29, 2018 file photo, wild horses drink from a watering hole outside Salt Lake City. A Senate panel has approved $35 million for a new wild horse initiative backed by animal welfare groups and the livestock industry but condemned by the largest mustang protection coalition that says it would put the free-roaming animals on a path to extinction. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
September 30, 2019 - 1:16 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — Congress is closer to approving a contentious wild horse initiative backed by national animal welfare groups and the livestock industry but condemned by leaders of the largest and oldest coalition of mustang advocates in the West. The Senate Appropriations Committee approved $35...
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September 26, 2019 - 6:21 pm
LOS BANOS, Calif. (AP) — In a story Sept. 25 about swamp rodents, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the Central Valley is an agricultural region 130 miles (210 kilometers) north of Sacramento. The Central Valley region spans about 400 miles (645 kilometers) from Redding to Bakersfield...
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FILE- In this May 5, 2009 file photo, a tiger cools off at its enclosure at the zoo in Ahmadabad, India. India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals. Prime Minister Narendra Modi says it's a "historic achievement" for India as the big cat's population had dwindled to 1,400 about 14-15 years ago. (AP Photo/Ajit Solanki, File)
July 29, 2019 - 3:58 am
NEW DELHI (AP) — India's tiger population has grown to nearly 3,000, making the country one of the safest habitats for the endangered animals. Prime Minister Narendra Modi released the tiger count for 2018 on Monday said it's a "historic achievement" for India as the big cat's population had...
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June 21, 2019 - 1:07 am
PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — So many gray whales are dying off the U.S. West Coast that scientists and volunteers who deal with the putrid carcasses have an urgent request for coastal residents: Lend us your private beaches so these ocean giants can rot in peace. The number of dead whales washing ashore...
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FILE - In this Feb. 23, 2016 file photo, people try to catch fish along the Sacramento River in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River Delta, near Courtland, Calif. The federal government has sued California over water policies it says violate state environmental protections. The lawsuit filed Thursday, March 28, 2019, in federal court in Sacramento challenges a plan that went into effect in December to increase water flows in the San Joaquin River. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
March 28, 2019 - 9:22 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The federal government sued California on Thursday over a water policy it said violates the state's environmental protection law. The U.S. Department of Justice filed suit in Sacramento federal court to block a contentious plan approved in December to increase river flows in the...
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FILE - This June 30, 2017 remote camera image released by the U.S. Forest Service shows a female gray wolf and her mate with a pup born in 2017 in the wilds of Lassen National Forest in Northern California. U.S. wildlife officials plan to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, re-igniting the legal battle over a predator that's run into conflicts with farmers and ranchers after rebounding in some regions, an official told The Associated Press, Wednesday, March 6, 2019. (U.S. Forest Service via AP, File)
March 06, 2019 - 8:06 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials plan to lift protections for gray wolves across the Lower 48 states, re-igniting the legal battle over a predator that's running into conflicts with farmers and ranchers as its numbers rebound in some regions. The proposal would give states the...
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February 12, 2019 - 1:29 am
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — Three rare black coyotes were among the nearly 150 coyotes killed during a massive hunting tournament near Charlotte, North Carolina. The Charlotte Observer reports tournament organizer 704 Outdoors TV says the amount of coyotes killed over the weekend during the Carolina...
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FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. For years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Salmon researchers perusing data on the website of the Center for Whale Research noticed a startling trend: that for the past two decades, significantly more of the whales have died in even-numbered years than in odd years. In a newly published paper, they speculate that the pattern is related to pink salmon, which return to the waters between Washington state and Canada in enormous numbers every other year. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 19, 2019 - 5:29 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Four salmon researchers were perusing data on the...
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January 06, 2019 - 7:51 am
JOHANNESBURG (AP) — Several African countries with some of the world's largest elephant populations will push this year for looser controls on legal ivory trade, while another group of countries on the continent says more restrictions are the best way to curb the illegal killing of elephants for...
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