Animal population control

In this photo taken Oct. 4, 2018, eastbound Interstate 90 traffic passes beneath a wildlife bridge under construction on Snoqualmie Pass, Wash. The stretch of highway crossing the Cascade Mountains cuts through old growth forest and wetlands, creating a dangerous border for wildlife everything from an elk down to a small salamander. The new crossing gives animals in these mountains a safer option for crossing the road: They'll be able to go above it. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
December 12, 2018 - 12:40 pm
SNOQUALMIE PASS, Wash. (AP) — Before descending the Cascade Mountains on its final stretch to Seattle, Interstate 90 cuts through a mountain pass of old growth forests and wetlands. For countless wildlife species, the busy highway is a border, constraining their movements and posing a fatal risk...
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FILE - In this March 14, 2018 file photo, a California sea lion designated #U253 heads towards the Pacific Ocean after being released in Newport, Ore. A bill making it easier to kill sea lions that feast on imperiled salmon in the Columbia River has cleared the U.S. Senate. The measure would allow a more streamlined process for Washington, Idaho, Oregon and several Pacific Northwest tribes to capture and euthanize sea lions. The bill sponsored by Idaho Sen. Jim Risch and Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell cleared the Senate Thursday, Dec. 6. It's similar to legislation that the U.S. House passed in June. (AP Photo/Don Ryan, File)
December 07, 2018 - 6:28 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — A bill that would make it easier to kill sea lions that feast on imperiled salmon in the Columbia River has cleared the U.S. Senate. State wildlife managers say rebounding numbers of sea lions are eating more salmon than ever and their appetites are undermining billions of dollars of...
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In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
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FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2010, file photo, an endangered Siberian tiger runs away with a chicken tossed by tourists at the Harbin Tiger Park in Harbin in northeastern China's Heilongjiang province. China on Nov. 12, 2018, says it is suspending rule changes allowing trading in tiger and rhinoceros parts, after the move to reverse a ban sparked an outcry from environmental groups. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 12, 2018 - 11:32 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China is postponing its decision to allow trading in tiger and rhinoceros parts a bare two weeks after the easing of the ban had raised fears the country was giving legal cover to poaching and smuggling of endangered wildlife. The official Xinhua News Agency quoted Cabinet official...
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October 07, 2018 - 4:56 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Officials say the number of tigers roaming the jungles of Nepal has nearly doubled because of initiatives from the government, conservationists and local authorities who have worked for years to increase the tiger population in the Himalayan nation. Gopal Prakash Bhattarai...
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In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018 photo, a Colorado River razorback sucker fish is shown swimming in a tank at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office in Lakewood, Colo. Officials say that the rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern United States. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott)
October 04, 2018 - 3:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — Another rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, wildlife officials said Thursday, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended reclassifying the ancient and odd-looking...
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In this Aug. 2018 photo provided by Tom Bradley, a bear eats from a garbage can outside the Bradley family home, in Canton, Conn. Connecticut reports that human encounters with bears are on the rise. A wildlife biologist with the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection says there have been about two dozen reports this year of bears breaking into Connecticut homes and businesses, about four times the yearly average. (Tom Bradley via AP)
September 24, 2018 - 10:35 pm
CANTON, Conn. (AP) — Tom Bradley had grown accustomed to seeing black bears walk through his Connecticut neighborhood, but this month he was alarmed to find something trying to turn a doorknob to enter his house. He used his key fob to set off his car horn, to scare away whatever was in his garage...
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FILE - In this July 6, 2011 file photo, a grizzly bear roams near Beaver Lake in Yellowstone National Park. Opponents of grizzly bear hunts planned in Wyoming and Idaho are asking a judge to further delay hunting while he considers a request to restore federal protections for the animals. (AP Photo/Jim Urquhart, File)
September 13, 2018 - 2:23 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A U.S. judge on Thursday delayed for two more weeks the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades, saying he needed more time to consider if federal protections for the animals should be restored. The ruling by U.S. District Judge Dana...
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September 11, 2018 - 5:41 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Interior Department land managers have been ordered to review hunting and fishing regulations on department lands to determine how they conflict with state regulations. In a memo Monday, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke ordered the review with an eye toward deferring to state...
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FILE - In this Jan. 14, 1995, file photo, a wolf leaps across a road into the wilds of Central Idaho. The U.S. government says it doesn't have to release information to an environmental group concerning investigations into livestock deaths in Idaho that can result in wolves being killed for preying on cattle and sheep. The U.S. Department of Justice, in documents filed Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in U.S. District Court, says the requested documents contain information that's exempt from Freedom of Information Act requests. (AP Photo/Douglas Pizac, File)
August 31, 2018 - 5:22 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Investigations into livestock deaths in Idaho blamed on wolves don't have to be made public, the U.S. government says. The U.S. Department of Justice in documents filed Thursday in U.S. District Court said the reports requested by an environmental group contain information that'...
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