Animal welfare

In this May 13, 2017 photo, an activist holds a sign during a protest outside Sea Life Park in Waimanalo, Hawaii. A marine mammal that has contributed to groundbreaking science for the past 30 years is again making waves after being sold to the marine amusement park in Hawaii. Kina is a false killer whale, a large member of the dolphin family. Animal-rights activists say she deserves a peaceful retirement in an ocean-based refuge but is instead being traumatized by confinement in concrete tanks at Sea Life Park. But Kina's former Navy trainer and a longtime marine mammal researcher say no such sea sanctuaries exist, and the park is the best place for the 40-year-old toothy cetacean. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
August 08, 2017 - 4:29 am
WAIMANALO, Hawaii (AP) — A Hawaii marine park's purchase of Kina, a 40-year-old false killer whale long used in echolocation research, has reignited a debate about captive marine mammals and the places that care for them. Most of the world's captive cetaceans - dolphins, whales and porpoises - are...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2005 file photo, a sage grouse is seen near Fallon, Nev. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says a new federal plan to protect the threatened sage grouse will better align with conservation efforts in 11 Western states where the bird lives. (AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)
August 08, 2017 - 3:39 am
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West. Wildlife advocates warn that the proposed changes would undercut a hard-won...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2005 file photo, a sage grouse is seen near Fallon, Nev. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says a new federal plan to protect the threatened sage grouse will better align with conservation efforts in 11 Western states where the bird lives. (AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)
August 07, 2017 - 1:37 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Interior Department on Monday unveiled a plan to protect the threatened sage grouse that gives Western states where the bird lives flexibility for economic development. Miners, ranchers and some Western governors had argued Obama-era policies jeopardized logging and other...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo, a gray wolf is seen at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. A federal appeals court Tuesday, Aug. 1, 2017, retained federal protection for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region, ruling that the government acted prematurely when it dropped them from the endangered species list. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File)
August 01, 2017 - 7:28 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — A federal appeals court Tuesday retained federal protection for gray wolves in the western Great Lakes region, ruling that the government made crucial errors when it dropped them from the endangered species list five years ago. The court upheld a district judge who...
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FILE - In this Sept. 25, 2013, file photo, a grizzly bear cub searches for fallen fruit beneath an apple tree a few miles from the north entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Gardiner, Mont. For the second time in a decade, the U.S. government has removed grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region from the threatened species list. The decision by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to remove federal protections from the approximately 700 bears living across 19,000 square miles in Montana, Idaho and Wyoming took effect Monday, July 31, 2017. (Alan Rogers/The Casper Star-Tribune via AP, file)
July 31, 2017 - 2:01 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. government lifted protections for grizzly bears in the Yellowstone region on Monday, though it will be up to the courts to decide whether the revered and fearsome icon of the West stays off the threatened species list. More than a month after announcing grizzlies in...
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July 27, 2017 - 2:47 am
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — A county animal shelter in North Carolina has been fined $2,500 for leaving dogs in outdoor kennels without adequate protection from the sun. The News & Record of Greensboro reports Guilford County Animal Services Director Drew Brinkley resigned Wednesday, hours after...
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FILE - This April 18, 2008 file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife shows a grey wolf. A federal report says gray wolves killed a record number of livestock in Wyoming in 2016, and wildlife managers responded by killing a record number of wolves that were responsible. The report released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that wolves killed 243 livestock, including one horse, in 2016 in Wyoming. As a result, wildlife managers last year killed 113 wolves that were confirmed to be attacking livestock. (AP Photo/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Gary Kramer, File)
July 19, 2017 - 4:46 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republicans are moving forward with legislation to roll back the Endangered Species Act, amid complaints that the landmark 44-year-old law hinders drilling, logging and other activities. At simultaneous hearings Wednesday, House and Senate committees considered bills...
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July 12, 2017 - 1:39 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York City has announced a $32 million, multi-agency plan to reduce the rat population. Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday the plan will target rats in the Grand Concourse area of the Bronx; Chinatown, the East Village and the Lower East Side in Manhattan; and the Bushwick and...
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Joey Chestnut eats two hot dogs at a time during the Nathan's Annual Famous International Hot Dog Eating Contest, Tuesday July 4, 2017, in New York. Chestnut won, marking his 10th victory in the event. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
July 04, 2017 - 2:51 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Joey "Jaws" Chestnut gulped, chomped and powered his way to a 10th title on Tuesday, continuing his record-setting reign as the chowing champion at the annual Nathan's Famous July Fourth hot dog eating contest. Shoving water-soaked buns and wriggling franks into his mouth on a hot,...
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July 03, 2017 - 3:53 pm
TUCKER, Ga. (AP) — The reward has grown to $10,000 for information leading to the arrest and conviction of whoever buried a dog up to her nose in the ground near Atlanta. The canine later died. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals announced the reward increase on Monday. Last month, Eric...
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