Animal welfare

November 27, 2018 - 10:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court is ordering a lower court to take a new look at a federal agency's designation of Louisiana timberland as a critical habitat for an endangered frog found only in Mississippi. The court ruled Tuesday in a case involving a 1,500-acre (607-hectare) tract owned...
Read More
A dog that snarled traffic on two Phoenix freeways during the morning commute is shown after it was finally caught after snarling traffic for hours on two Phoenix freeways Tuesday, Nov. 20, 2018. It will be quarantined for 10 days after it bit a state trooper trying to grab its collar. Authorities say dispatchers got calls overnight about the dog being on at least one freeway and that efforts to remove it intensified during the commute when it began tying up traffic on State Routes 51 and 202. (Arizona Department of Public Safety via AP)
November 20, 2018 - 2:53 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A German shepherd snarled traffic as it loped on and off two Phoenix freeways during Tuesday morning's commute before it was captured by a state trooper who was bit on the hand while grabbing its collar. The trooper is going to be fine, and the wayward dog was being evaluated at an...
Read More
In this undated photo provided by Eric Regehr, polar bears are seen on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Circle. A study of polar bears in the Chukchi Sea between Alaska and Russia finds that the population is thriving for now despite a loss of sea ice due to climate change. Lead author Eric Regehr of the University of Washington says the Chukchi may be buffered from some effects of ice loss. Regehr says polar bears can build fat reserves and the Chukchi's abundant seal population may allow bears to compensate for a loss of hunting time on ice. (AP Photo Eric Regehr via AP)
November 15, 2018 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The first formal count of polar bears in waters between the United States and Russia indicates they're doing better than some of their cousins elsewhere. Polar bears are listed as a threatened species because of diminished sea ice due to climate change. But university and...
Read More
In this July 11, 2018 photo, animal geneticist Alison Van Eenennaam of the University of California, Davis, points to a group of dairy calves that won’t have to be de-horned thanks to gene editing. The calves are descended from a bull genetically altered to be hornless, and the company behind the work, Recombinetics, says gene-edited traits could ease animal suffering and improve productivity. (AP Photo/Haven Daley)
November 15, 2018 - 7:52 am
OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty. A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2010, file photo, an endangered Siberian tiger runs away with a chicken tossed by tourists at the Harbin Tiger Park in Harbin in northeastern China's Heilongjiang province. China on Nov. 12, 2018, says it is suspending rule changes allowing trading in tiger and rhinoceros parts, after the move to reverse a ban sparked an outcry from environmental groups. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
November 12, 2018 - 11:32 pm
BEIJING (AP) — China is postponing its decision to allow trading in tiger and rhinoceros parts a bare two weeks after the easing of the ban had raised fears the country was giving legal cover to poaching and smuggling of endangered wildlife. The official Xinhua News Agency quoted Cabinet official...
Read More
November 06, 2018 - 3:23 pm
SKOPJE, Macedonia (AP) — Macedonia's government has pledged to revise legislation on stray animals after a teenage girl drowned in a river while trying to escape a pack of feral dogs. Police say the dogs went after the girl on Monday in a public park in the city of Gostivar. The 17-year-old's body...
Read More
This photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a female Pacific walrus resting, Sept. 19, 2013 in Point Lay, Alaska. A lawsuit making its way through federal court in Alaska will decide whether Pacific walruses should be listed as a threatened species, giving them additional protections. Walruses use sea ice for giving birth, nursing and resting between dives for food but the amount of ice over several decades has steadily declined due to climate warming. (Ryan Kingsbery/U.S. Geological Survey via AP)
October 13, 2018 - 2:39 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Given a choice between giving birth on land or sea ice, Pacific walrus mothers most often choose ice. Likewise, they prefer sea ice for molting, mating, nursing and resting between dives for food. Trouble is, as the century progresses, there's going to be far less ice...
Read More
October 07, 2018 - 4:56 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Officials say the number of tigers roaming the jungles of Nepal has nearly doubled because of initiatives from the government, conservationists and local authorities who have worked for years to increase the tiger population in the Himalayan nation. Gopal Prakash Bhattarai...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 10, 2008, file photo, chickens huddle in their cages at an egg processing plant at the Dwight Bell Farm in Atwater, Calif. Proposition 12 on California's November ballot would require that egg-laying hens be cage free by 2022. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
October 06, 2018 - 12:14 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California voters are right to think they already weighed in on how big cages should be for egg-laying hens. In 2008, voters ushered in Proposition 2, which sought to free egg-laying hens from tiny cages. It didn't outlaw cages but barred California farmers from keeping hens —...
Read More
In this Tuesday, Oct. 2, 2018 photo, a Colorado River razorback sucker fish is shown swimming in a tank at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service office in Lakewood, Colo. Officials say that the rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern United States. (AP Photo/Dan Elliott)
October 04, 2018 - 3:01 pm
DENVER (AP) — Another rare Colorado River fish has been pulled back from the brink of extinction, wildlife officials said Thursday, the second comeback this year for a species unique to the Southwestern U.S. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service recommended reclassifying the ancient and odd-looking...
Read More

Pages