Biology

In this Aug. 4, 2019 photo provided by Taylor Williams, a new species of seaweed covers dead a coral reef at Pearl and Hermes Atoll in the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Researchers say the recently discovered species of seaweed is killing large patches of coral on once-pristine reefs and is rapidly spreading across one of the most remote and protected ocean environments on earth. A study from the University of Hawaii and others says the seaweed is spreading more rapidly than anything they've seen in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, a nature reserve that stretches more than 1,300 miles north of the main Hawaiian Islands. The algae easily breaks off and rolls across the ocean floor like tumbleweed, scientists say, covering nearby reefs in thick vegetation that out-competes coral for space, sunlight and nutrients. (Taylor Williams/College of Charleston via AP)
July 07, 2020 - 2:58 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — Researchers say a recently discovered species of seaweed is killing large patches of coral on once-pristine reefs and is rapidly spreading across one of the most remote and protected ocean environments on earth. A study from the University of Hawaii and others says the seaweed is...
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In this undated photo provided by Biobot in June 2020 technicians take a sewage sample. Across the U.S. and in Europe, researchers and health officials say they can track the course of a community outbreak by studying the waste flushed from its bathrooms. And that can provide a valuable addition to public health tools, they say. (Biobot via AP)
July 06, 2020 - 7:07 am
NEW YORK (AP) — One county in Utah beat back a spike of pandemic virus infections in the spring, and another saw its rate jump. Both trends showed up in their sewage. Yes, sewage. Across the U.S. and in Europe, researchers and health officials say they can track the course of a community outbreak...
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In this June 5, 2020 photo provided by the Mountain Area Health Education Center, physicians, residents and staff from the facility in Asheville, N.C., take a knee to show support for renewed calls for racial justice after the police killing of George Floyd. Government statistics from late January through May 30 suggest an increase in U.S. deaths from chronic diseases compared with historical trends. They include 7,000 excess deaths from hypertension, about 4,000 from diabetes and 3,000 from strokes -- all conditions that disproportionately affect Blacks, although the data don’t include race. (Brenda Benik/MAHEC via AP)
July 05, 2020 - 10:07 am
Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately. They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And...
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July 03, 2020 - 3:55 am
JERUSALEM (AP) — A state-linked technology company in the United Arab Emirates has signed a partnership with two major Israeli defense firms to research ways of combating the coronavirus pandemic. The agreement, announced late Thursday, comes just weeks after the UAE warned Israel that proceeding...
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This 2014 microscope photo provided by Dr. F. Dahlke shows 1.5 mm diameter eggs of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Global warming looks like it will be a far bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought, since a study led by Dahlke released on Thursday, July 2, 2020 shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are far more vulnerable to hotter water. (Dr. F. Dahlke via AP)
July 02, 2020 - 2:04 pm
Global warming looks like it will be a bigger problem for the world’s fish species than scientists first thought: A new study shows that when fish are spawning or are embryos they are more vulnerable to hotter water. With medium-level human-caused climate change expected by the end of the century,...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, June 24, 2020 file photo, a volunteer receives a COVID-19 test vaccine injection developed at the University of Oxford in Britain, at the Chris Hani Baragwanath hospital in Soweto, Johannesburg, South Africa. People on six continents are testing experimental shots as the race for a COVID-19 vaccine enters a defining summer, with even bigger studies poised to prove if any leading candidate really works - and possibly offer the public a reality check. (AP Photo/Siphiwe Sibeko)
June 28, 2020 - 10:12 am
People on six continents already are getting jabs in the arm as the race for a COVID-19 vaccine enters a defining summer, with even bigger studies poised to prove if any shot really works -- and maybe offer a reality check. Already British and Chinese researchers are chasing the coronavirus beyond...
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FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, Colorado Rockies right fielder Charlie Blackmon waits to enter the batting cage before the team's baseball game against the St. Louis Cardinals in Denver. All-Star outfielder Charlie Blackmon of the Colorado Rockies has become the first Major League Baseball player known to have tested positive for the coronavirus. A person familiar with Blackmon’s situation confirmed the test result to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because there was no official announcement. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)
June 24, 2020 - 2:10 pm
All-Star outfielder Charlie Blackmon of the Colorado Rockies has become the first Major League Baseball player known to have tested positive for the coronavirus. A person familiar with Blackmon’s situation confirmed the test result to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Wednesday because...
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FILE - In this Aug. 7, 2019, file photo, the queen bee (marked in green) and worker bees move around a hive at the Veterans Affairs in Manchester, N.H. The annual survey released Monday, June 22, 2020, of U.S. beekeepers found that honeybee colonies are doing better after a bad year. Monday's survey found winter losses were lower than normal, the second smallest in 14 years of records. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
June 22, 2020 - 2:05 pm
American honeybee colonies have bounced back after a bad year, the annual beekeeping survey finds. Beekeepers only lost 22.2% of their colonies this past winter, from Oct. 1 to March 31, which is lower than the average of 28.6%, according to the Bee Informed Partnership’s annual survey of thousands...
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A girl wearing a face mask walks with a bottle of drinking water and a food packet that she received from a food distribution site in Mumbai, India, Saturday, June 20, 2020. India is the fourth hardest-hit country by the COVID-19 pandemic in the world after the U.S., Russia and Brazil. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)
June 20, 2020 - 11:03 am
BEIJING (AP) — Authorities in China appeared to be winning their battle against an outbreak of coronavirus in Beijing on Saturday, but in parts of the Americas the pandemic raged unabated. Brazil surpassed 1 million confirmed infections, second only to the United States. Europe, in contrast,...
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FILE - In this June 30, 2019, file photo parade-goers carrying rainbow flags walk down a street during the LBGTQ Pride march in New York, to celebrate five decades of LGBTQ pride, marking the 50th anniversary of the police raid that sparked the modern-day gay rights movement. Democrats flooded Twitter and email inboxes this week with praise for the watershed Supreme Court decision shielding gay, lesbian and transgender people from job discrimination. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)
June 19, 2020 - 3:11 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration Friday moved forward with a rule that rolls back health care protections for transgender people, even as the Supreme Court barred sex discrimination against LGBT individuals on the job. The rule from the Department of Health and Human Services was...
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