Border patrols

President Donald Trump talks with U.S. Air Force Academy football team coach Troy Calhoun in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 2, 2017, during a presentation ceremony of the Commander-in-Chief trophy to the Air Force Academy football. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
May 03, 2017 - 4:31 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration says its budget compromise with Congress includes hundreds of millions of dollars in border wall funding. Those funds might be for the border, but they're not to build the new "big beautiful wall" that President Donald Trump has promised. An AP Fact Check...
Read More
April 13, 2017 - 10:25 pm
UNITED STATES-AFGHANISTAN Pentagon: US dropped largest non-nuclear bomb in Afghanistan WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon says U.S. forces in Afghanistan dropped the military's largest non-nuclear bomb on an Islamic State target in Afghanistan. Adam Stump is a Pentagon spokesman. Stump says it was the...
Read More
FILE - In this July 9, 2012, file photo, with wanted posters off to the side, Laura E. Duffy, United States Attorney Southern District of California, and FBI Special Agent in Charge, James L. Turgal, Jr., right, announce the indictments on five suspects involved in the death of U.S. Border Patrol agent Brian Terry in Tucson, Ariz. Mexican authorities have arrested the suspected shooter in the 2010 killing of Terry, whose death exposed a bungled gun-tracking operation by the federal government. In a joint statement issued by Mexico's navy and its federal Attorney General's Office on Thursday, April 13, in Mexico City that the suspect who's name wasn't released in Terry's death was arrested near the border between the states of Sinoloa and Chihuahua, a mountainous region note drug activity. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin, File)
April 13, 2017 - 5:48 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A Mexican fugitive accused of pulling the trigger to kill a U.S. Border Patrol agent was captured more than six years after a slaying that exposed a bungled gun-tracking operation by the federal government. Mexican authorities arrested Heraclio Osorio-Arellanes on Wednesday as the U...
Read More
Attorney General Jeff Sessions, left, shakes hands with U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers as he tours the U.S.-Mexico border, Tuesday, April 11, 2017, in Nogales, Ariz. Sessions announced making immigration enforcement a key Justice Department priority, saying he will speed up deportations of immigrants in the country illegally who were convicted of federal crimes. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)
April 11, 2017 - 11:46 pm
NOGALES, Ariz. (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions toured the U.S.-Mexico border Tuesday and unveiled what he described as a new get-tough approach to immigration prosecutions under President Donald Trump. The nation's top law enforcement official outlined a series of changes that he said mark...
Read More
FILE - In this March 15, 2017, file photo, Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks to law enforcement officers in Richmond, Va. Sessions favors decades-old drug and crime-fighting strategies, even as some people involved in criminal justice during that time have come to believe they went too far, for too long. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
April 11, 2017 - 1:54 pm
NOGALES, Ariz. (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions toured the U.S.-Mexico border Tuesday and unveiled what he described as a new get-tough approach to immigration prosecutions under President Donald Trump. The nation's top law enforcement official outlined a series of changes that he said mark...
Read More
April 06, 2017 - 8:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans oppose funding President Donald Trump's wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, according to poll released Thursday by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. The president gets higher marks for efforts to boost defense spending and beef up the...
Read More
Graphic shows monthly U.S. southwest border arrests since 2000; 2c x 3 inches; 96.3 mm x 76 mm;
April 05, 2017 - 12:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Parents and children caught crossing the Mexican border into the United States illegally generally can remain together, the Homeland Security Department said Wednesday, in a partial reversal of previous comments. Secretary John Kelly told a Senate panel that families would not be...
Read More
In this April 1, 2017, photo, a man in Nogales, Ariz., talks to his daughter and her mother who are standing on the other side of the border fence in Nogales, Mexico. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly says arrests of people entering the United States illegally across the Mexican border plummeted in March 2017. That's a signal that fewer people are trying to sneak into the U.S. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)
April 05, 2017 - 10:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly says the sharp decline in people crossing the southern border illegally won't continue unless his agency gets the resources needed to secure the border. Kelly says a wall in the right places, will do that job. He told a Senate panel that the...
Read More
FILE - In this June 13, 2013, file photo, hands from Daniel Zambrano of Tijuana, Mexico, hold on to the bars that make up the border wall separating the U.S. and Mexico as the border meets the Pacific Ocean in San Diego. One potential bidder on President Donald Trump's border wall with Mexico wanted to know if the government would help if its workers came under "hostile attack." With bids due Tuesday, April 4, 2017, on the first design contracts, companies are preparing for the worst if they get the potentially lucrative but controversial job. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
April 04, 2017 - 2:14 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — One potential bidder on President Donald Trump's border wall with Mexico wanted to know if authorities would rush to help if workers came under "hostile attack." Another asked if employees can carry firearms in states with strict gun control laws and if the government would...
Read More
FILE - In this May 11, 2016, file photo, Tim Foley shows how to climb a section of the border wall separating Mexico and the United States near where it ends as journalists Chitose Nakagawa, right, and Marcie Mieko Kagawa look on in Sasabe, Ariz. Foley, a former construction foreman, founded Arizona Border Recon, a group of armed volunteers who dedicate themselves to border surveillance. With bids due Tuesday, April 4, 2017, on the first border wall design contracts, companies are preparing for the worst if they get the potentially lucrative but controversial job. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
April 04, 2017 - 10:04 am
SAN DIEGO (AP) — One potential bidder on President Donald Trump's border wall with Mexico wanted to know if authorities would rush to help if workers came under "hostile attack." Another asked if employees can carry firearms in states with strict gun control laws and if the government would...
Read More

Pages