Child and teen health

Hisako Sakiyama, a medical doctor and representative of the 3.11 Fund for Children With Thyroid Cancer, speaks to reporters in Tokyo, Friday, March 31, 2017. Sakiyama, who has sat on government panels to investigate the Fukushima disaster, says a child who was 4 at the time of the disaster , has been diagnosed with thyroid cancer and that case is missing from the official government records. (AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)
March 31, 2017 - 2:52 am
TOKYO (AP) — A child diagnosed with thyroid cancer after the Fukushima nuclear accident is missing from government checkup records, an aid group said Friday, raising questions about the thoroughness and transparency of the screenings. Japanese authorities have said that among the 184 confirmed and...
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March 27, 2017 - 7:48 am
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — A report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that South Carolina has made progress in reducing the infant death rate in the state. The Post and Courier of Charleston reported ( http://bit.ly/2n9vST8 ) that the infant mortality rate in South Carolina...
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This image released by Sesame Workshop shows Julia, a new autistic muppet character debuting on the 47th Season of "Sesame Street," on April 10, 2017, on both PBS and HBO. (Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop via AP)
March 20, 2017 - 4:49 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Folks on Sesame Street have a way of making everyone feel accepted. That certainly goes for Julia, a Muppet youngster with blazing red hair, bright green eyes — and autism. Rather than being treated like an outsider, which too often is the plight of kids on the spectrum, Julia is...
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This image released by Sesame Workshop shows Julia, a new autistic muppet character debuting on the 47th Season of "Sesame Street," on April 10, 2017, on both PBS and HBO. (Zach Hyman/Sesame Workshop via AP)
March 20, 2017 - 12:09 am
NEW YORK (AP) — Folks on Sesame Street have a way of making everyone feel accepted. That certainly goes for Julia, a Muppet youngster with blazing red hair, bright green eyes — and autism. Rather than being treated like an outsider, which too often is the plight of kids on the spectrum, Julia is...
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In This picture taken in January 2017 and provided by UNICEF, Children review manuals distributed by UNICEF-supported volunteers on the risks of unexploded remnants of war, and how to identify and report them, while sitting amid rubble at Al- Sakhoor neighbourhood, east Aleppo, Syria. The U.N.'s child relief agency says at least 652 children were killed in Syria last year, making 2016 the worst year yet for the country's rising generation. UNICEF says schools, hospitals, playgrounds, parks, and homes across the country are unsafe for children and come frequently under attack. (Khudr Al-Issa/ UNICEF via AP )
March 13, 2017 - 5:57 am
BEIRUT (AP) — In Syria, last year was the worst yet for the country's rising generation, with at least 652 children killed in 2016, the United Nations' child relief agency said Monday. There was no letup to attacks on schools, hospitals, playgrounds, parks and homes as the Syrian government, its...
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March 10, 2017 - 10:35 am
BUCHAREST, Romania (AP) — Romania's health minister says thousands of people have caught measles in an ongoing outbreak in the country, which has claimed 17 lives. Florian Bodog said Friday that around 3,400 people had contracted the disease since the outbreak began in September 2016. He said the...
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In this picture taken, Feb. 16, 2017, a Syrian school teacher from Deir Ezzour, stands with his son and daughter in Al Hol Camp, Hasakah Governorate, Syria. A new report by Save the Children says Syrian children are showing symptoms of ‘toxic stress’ from war exposure, and attempting self-harm and suicide. (Photo Courtesy: Jonathan Hyams, Save the Children via AP)
March 07, 2017 - 12:41 am
BEIRUT (AP) — Syrian children show symptoms of "toxic stress" and are attempting self-harm and suicide in response to prolonged exposure to war, according to a report released on Tuesday. Children do not feel safe at school and are developing speech disorders and incontinence, and some are even...
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March 03, 2017 - 12:46 pm
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Sanford Health, one of the largest health systems in the country, is partnering with the flagship hospital of the Miami Children's Health System to sequence the genes of nearly 1,000 Latinos and Hispanics in order to better understand the health needs of the populations...
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This 2009 colorized microscope image made available by the Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia via the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows a sickle cell, left, and normal red blood cells of a patient with sickle cell anemia. Researchers say a French teen who was given gene therapy for sickle cell disease more than two years ago now has enough properly working red blood cells to dodge the effects of the disorder. The case is detailed in the March 2, 2017 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (Janice Haney Carr/CDC/Sickle Cell Foundation of Georgia via AP)
March 01, 2017 - 5:02 pm
Researchers say a French teen who was given gene therapy for sickle cell disease more than two years ago now has enough properly working red blood cells to dodge the effects of the disorder. The teen was the first in the world to get the treatment for sickle cell, which affects 90,000 Americans,...
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