Climatology

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 2019, file photo, smoke and steam rise from a coal processing plant that produces carbon black, an ingredient in steel manufacturing, in Hejin in central China's Shanxi Province. A new study finds that global man-made carbon pollution continues to rise, but it's not increasing as fast as the previous couple years. The study published Tuesday, Dec. 3, by scientists at the Global Carbon Project finds carbon dioxide emissions increased six tenths of a percent from 2018. (AP Photo/Sam McNeil, File)
December 03, 2019 - 7:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world continues to increase the amount of heat-trapping carbon dioxide it pumps into the air, but it’s not rising as fast as in the previous couple years. Led by big jumps from China and India, the world is projected to spew 40.57 billion tons (36.8 billion metric tons) of...
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Kjetil Wormnes, automation and robotics system engineer, poses with the Space Rover after a training exercise of the European Space Agency, ESA, in Katwijk, near The Hague, Netherlands, Monday, Nov. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
November 28, 2019 - 11:14 am
MADRID (AP) — The 22 member states of the European Space agency pledged Thursday to boost their funding to support more missions and research projects, including a new generation of satellites to monitor climate change. The agency’s director-general, Jan Woerner, said at the conclusion two-day...
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This May 3, 2009, photo taken in Point Hope, Alaska, provided by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, shows the entrance to an ice cellar, a type of underground food dug into the permafrost to provide natural refrigeration used for generations in far-north communities. Naturally cooled underground ice cellars, used in Alaska Native communities for generations, are becoming increasingly unreliable as a warming climate and other factors touch multiple facets of life in the far north. (Mike Brubaker/Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium via AP)
November 25, 2019 - 9:22 am
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — For generations, people in Alaska’s far-north whaling villages have relied on hand-built ice cellars dug deep into the permafrost to age their subsistence food to perfection and keep it cold throughout the year. Scores of the naturally refrigerated food caches lie beneath...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 3:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The worsening wildfires, floods and hurricanes of climate change threaten at least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites, and efforts to strengthen the hazardous waste sites are stalling in some vulnerable regions as the Trump administration plays down the threat, a congressional watchdog...
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FILE - In this Nov. 30, 2017 photo, boats are shown moored in the Anclote River near the old Stauffer chemical plant site in Tarpon Springs, Fla. Hundreds of the nation's most polluted places are at an increasing risk of spreading contamination beyond their borders by more frequent storms and rising seas. Sixty percent of U.S. Superfund sites are in danger from weather extremes like hurricanes or wildfires, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to acknowledge and plan for climate change is hurting chances of safeguarding them, according to a government watchdog. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)
November 18, 2019 - 10:10 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — At least 60% of U.S. Superfund sites are in areas vulnerable to flooding or other worsening disasters of climate change, and the Trump administration’s reluctance to directly acknowledge global warming is deterring efforts to safeguard them, a congressional watchdog agency says...
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A man holds up a phone during a video call to show a a flooded alley outside a shop, in Venice, Italy, Friday, Nov. 15, 2019. Exceptionally high tidal waters returned to Venice on Friday, prompting the mayor to close the iconic St. Mark's Square and call for donations to repair the Italian lagoon city just three days after it experienced its worst flooding in 50 years. (AP Photo/Luca Bruno)
November 15, 2019 - 4:46 pm
VENICE, Italy (AP) — The historic lagoon city of Venice exists on the edge of a double threat: As it sinks, the seas rise. That reality became more stark this week when Venice was hit with its worst flood in over 50 years, caused by a nearly 1.9 meter (6-foot) tide that sent waist-high water...
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Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg pulls her speech out of a pocket as she steps up to speak to several thousand people at a climate strike rally Friday, Oct. 11, 2019, in Denver. The rally was staged in Denver's Civic Center Park. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
October 11, 2019 - 9:07 pm
DENVER (AP) — Young people must be prepared to continue striking to call for action on climate change for a long time and not back down, Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg told a climate strike rally in Denver on Friday. Thunberg said she and fellow youth activists won't beg those in power to...
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Super scoopers make drops on the Saddleridge fire in Placerita Canyon near Newhall, Calif., Friday, Oct. 11, 2019. (David Crane/The Orange County Register via AP)
October 11, 2019 - 5:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Expect more preventative power blackouts in California as the climate gets hotter and drier and the wildfire season gets nastier and longer, scientists say. The Golden State already is fire-prone with lots of dry plants and woodlands — but add high winds that can knock down power...
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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg in Montreal on Friday, Sept. 27, 2019. Thunberg says she delivered the same message to Trudeau that she gives to all politicians -- that he needs to listen to the science and act on it. (Ryan Remiorz/The Canadian Press via AP)
September 27, 2019 - 8:04 pm
TORONTO (AP) — Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg said Friday she doesn't understand why grown-ups and world leaders would mock children and teens for acting on science, responding to attacks on her campaign as students conducted a second wave of global protests demanding action on climate change...
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In this Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019 photo, George Johnson points to a thermostat at the barber shop where he works in Longwood, Fla. Johnson says he rarely uses public transportation but is worried about climate change and keeps his driving to a minimum. He sometimes takes other conservation steps such as eating vegetarian meals and planting trees while always turning off unnecessary lights. “You’ve got to start somewhere,” he said. “If everybody just turned off their lights one hour or anything, it can help.” (AP Photo/John Raoux)
September 27, 2019 - 1:12 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Turn off the lights when they aren't needed? Check. Lower the thermostat a few degrees in winter? Maybe. Go full-time vegetarian? Probably not. Americans are willing to go only so far in engaging in habits that conserve energy and reduce emissions that are warming the...
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