Coastlines and beaches

Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 14, 2019 - 5:03 am
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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Alan and Dot Richardson, from England, wear ponchos as they walk along Bourbon Street in the French Quarter Friday, July 12, 2019, in New Orleans, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. The National Weather Service in New Orleans says water is already starting to cover some low lying roads as Tropical Storm Barry approaches the state from the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 12, 2019 - 11:27 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Homeowners sandbagged their doors and tourists trying to get out of town jammed the airport Friday as Tropical Storm Barry began rolling in, threatening an epic drenching that could test how well New Orleans has strengthened its flood protections in the 14 years since Hurricane...
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In this May 10, 2019 photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife's Office of Spill Prevention and Response, oil flows at a Chevron oil field in Kern County, Calif. Nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water has seeped from the ground since May. Chevron and California officials say the spill is not near any waterway and has not significantly affected wildlife. (California Deptartment of Fish and Wildlife's Office of Spill Prevention and Response via AP)
July 12, 2019 - 8:54 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Officials began to clean up a massive oil spill Friday that dumped nearly 800,000 gallons of oil and water into a California canyon, making it larger — if less devastating — than the state's last two major oil spills. The newly revealed spill has been flowing off and on...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2017, file photo, residents move a "no wake," sign through flood waters caused by king tides in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. Federal scientists, according to a report released Wednesday, July 10, 2019, predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year due to rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino weather system. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)
July 10, 2019 - 3:21 pm
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The federal government is warning Americans to brace for a "floodier" future. Government scientists predict 40 places in the U.S. will experience higher than normal rates of so-called sunny day flooding this year because of rising sea levels and an abnormal El Nino...
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July 10, 2019 - 3:10 pm
DULUTH, Minn. (AP) — A Minnesota woman who swims topless in Lake Superior says she won't be dissuaded by someone who called the police on her. Michelle Bennett was sunbathing topless on the beach in Duluth last month when a woman asked her to cover up, saying she was making the woman's children...
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July 04, 2019 - 11:01 am
SEATTLE (AP) — A climate study has estimated that Seattle's costs associated with sea level rise could be more than $23.8 billion by 2040. KOMO-TV reported Wednesday that the Center for Climate Integrity conducted the evaluation of potential costs of constructing seawalls in 22 coastal states and...
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A whale is unloaded at a port in Kushiro, in the northernmost main island of Hokkaido, Monday, July 1, 2019. Japan is resuming commercial whaling after 31 years, meeting a long-cherished goal seen as a largely lost cause. Japan's six-month notice to withdraw from the International Whaling Commission took effect Sunday.(Masanori Takei/Kyodo News via AP)
July 01, 2019 - 8:38 pm
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese whalers returned to port Monday with their first catch after resuming commercial whaling for the first time in 31 years, achieving the long-cherished goal of traditionalists that is seen as largely a lost cause amid slowing demand for the meat and changing views on...
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FILE - This May 24, 2006, file photo shows the village of Newtok, Alaska, where the eroding bank along the Ninglick River has long been a problem for the village, 480 miles west of Anchorage. Northern Alaska coastal communities and climate scientists say sea ice disappeared far earlier than normal this spring and it's affecting wildlife. The Anchorage Daily News reported in June 2019 that ice melted because of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures. (AP Photo/Al Grillo, File)
June 30, 2019 - 8:43 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Sea ice along northern Alaska disappeared far earlier than normal this spring, alarming coastal residents who rely on wildlife and fish. Ice melted as a result of exceptionally warm ocean temperatures, the Anchorage Daily News reported . The early melting has been "crazy,"...
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In this photo taken June 18, 2019, provided by the Ocean Voyages Institute, are nets brought in by the sailing ship Kwai from the Pacific gyre cleanup in Honolulu. Mariners on a sailing vessel hundreds of miles from the Hawaiian coast picked up more than 40 tons of abandoned fishing nets in an effort to clean a garbage patch in the Pacific Ocean, where the nets can entangle whales, turtles and fish and damage coral reefs. The crew of volunteers with the California-based nonprofit Ocean Voyages Institute fished out the derelict nets from a marine gyre between Hawaii and California known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch during a 25-day expedition, the group's founder, Mary Crowley, announced Friday, June 28, 2019. (AJ Jaeger/Ocean Voyages Institute via AP)
June 28, 2019 - 3:24 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In a mission to clean up trash floating in the ocean, environmentalists pulled 40 tons (36 metric tons) of abandoned fishing nets this month from an area known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Mariners on a 140-foot (43-meter) cargo sailboat outfitted with a crane voyaged...
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This September 2018 photo provided by NOAA shows a NOAA research vessel at a Taylor Energy production site in the Gulf of Mexico. A new federally led study of oil seeping from a platform toppled off Louisiana's coast 14½ years ago found releases lower than other recent estimates, but contradicts the well owner's assertions about the amount and source of oil. (NOAA via AP)
June 24, 2019 - 9:01 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A new federally led study of oil seeping from a platform toppled off Louisiana's coast 14½ years ago found releases lower than other recent estimates, but contradicts the well owner's assertions about the amount and source of oil. Oil and gas have been leaking into the Gulf of...
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