College admissions

Choi Soon-sil, center, a confidante of former South Korean President Park Geun-hye, arrives at the Seoul Central District Court in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Feb. 13, 2018. Choi Soon-sil, a confidante of former South Korean President Park Guen-hye has arrived at court to hear the verdict in her political corruption case. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)
February 13, 2018 - 9:56 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A confidante accused of collaborating with South Korea's former president for personal gain was sentenced Tuesday to 20 years in prison for bribery and other crimes in a political scandal that triggered the country's first presidential impeachment and the conviction of an...
Read More
November 24, 2017 - 10:05 am
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — As demand rises for physician assistants in South Carolina, there are shortages both with the schools that teach them and the clinics who train them. Medical University of South Carolina Director of Physician Assistant Studies Helen Martin says she gets 1,600 applicants and...
Read More
FILE - In this Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, file photo, Cadet Simone Askew, of Fairfax, Va., who has been selected first captain of the U.S. Military Academy Corps of Cadets for the upcoming academic year, answers questions during a news conference, in West Point, NY. Askew earned another prestigious honor Sunday, Nov. 19, when she was one of 32 Americans awarded Rhodes scholarships to study at Oxford University in England. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)
November 19, 2017 - 3:36 pm
The latest group of U.S. Rhodes scholars includes 10 African Americans — the most ever in a single Rhodes class — as well as a transgender man and four students from colleges that had never had received the honor before. The Rhodes Trust on Sunday announced the 32 men and women chosen for post-...
Read More
FILE - In this May 14, 2013 file photo, the Justice Department headquarters building in Washington. The Trump administration is signaling that it will begin investigating universities over whether their admissions policies illegally discriminate against applicants, according to a published report. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
August 02, 2017 - 6:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department said Wednesday it had no broad plans to investigate whether college and university admission programs discriminate against students based on race, seeking to defray worries that a job posting signaled an effort to reverse course on affirmative action. News...
Read More
FILE - In this May 14, 2013 file photo, the Justice Department headquarters building in Washington. The Trump administration is signaling that it will begin investigating universities over whether their admissions policies illegally discriminate against applicants, according to a published report. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
August 02, 2017 - 5:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Civil rights groups on Wednesday accused the Trump administration of "changing course on a key civil rights issue" after reports that it was launching a special project to investigate whether college and university admissions programs discriminate against students based on race...
Read More
August 02, 2017 - 12:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is signaling that it will begin investigating universities over whether their admissions policies illegally discriminate against applicants, according to a published report. The New York Times reported late Tuesday that a recent internal Justice Department...
Read More
August 02, 2017 - 12:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration could begin investigating universities over whether their admissions policies illegally discriminate against applicants. That's according to The New York Times, which reported Wednesday that it obtained an internal Justice Department job posting. The...
Read More
This June 16, 2017 photo shows social media app icons on a smartphone held by an Associated Press reporter in San Francisco. Google yourself. Curate your online photos. And as one private high school advises its students: Don't post anything online you wouldn't want your grandmother to see. AP spoke with experts on the role of social media in the college admissions process. They offered tips for students on what to post - and not post - if you're trying to get into college. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
June 19, 2017 - 4:06 am
Google yourself. Curate your online photos. The general rule of thumb, as one private high school advises its students: Don't post anything you wouldn't want your grandmother to see. Guidance counselors have warned college applicants for years to mind their social media posts but can now cite a...
Read More
FILE - In this March 7, 2017 file photo, rowers paddle down the Charles River near the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. A debate over the appropriateness of the school's decision to rescind offers of admission to 10 students has expanded far beyond the halls of Harvard and is being watched closely by other campuses, particularly at a time of heightened attention to free speech on college campuses. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)
June 19, 2017 - 4:00 am
LAS VEGAS (AP) — Few college-bound kids lose their shot, and their slot, at their dream school once they get in, but it happened at one of the world's most elite institutions and for a reason that has, until recently, hardly registered in the university admissions process: social media. Harvard...
Read More

Pages