Commercial fishing and hunting

FILE - In this March 28, 2018, file photo, a North Atlantic right whale breaches the surface of Cape Cod bay off the coast of Plymouth, Mass. A group organized by the federal government is expected to release recommendations about how to better protect a vanishing species of whale in the Atlantic Ocean. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration created the Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Team to help reduce the injuries and deaths the North Atlantic right whales suffer due to entanglement in fishing gear. The group’s recommendations are expected on Friday. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer, File)
April 26, 2019 - 3:15 pm
The amount of gear the East Coast lobster fishery puts in the water must be reduced in order to protect a dwindling species of large whale, a federal government team recommended Friday. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Atlantic Large Whale Take Reduction Team wrapped up several...
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April 08, 2019 - 4:47 am
MOREHEAD CITY, N.C. (AP) — More money is heading to North Carolina commercial fishermen whose landings were harmed by Hurricane Florence. The state Division of Marine Fisheries is sending out 1,000 checks totaling $7.2 million to compensate fishermen whose harvests fell in October and November due...
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April 04, 2019 - 12:35 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Federal officials are now supporting a Native American tribe's decades-long request to resume whale hunts off the coast of Washington state. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Thursday announced its proposal to allow the Makah Tribe of Washington to hunt and...
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FILE - In this May 26, 2017, file photo, Susie Gelbart walks near petroglyphs at the Gold Butte National Monument near Bunkerville, Nev. As Democrats in Congress prepare to scrutinize President Donald Trump's review of 27 national monuments, most of the recommendations made by ex-Interior Ryan Zinke remain unfinished, seemingly stuck on the backburner as other matters consume the White House. Zinke recommended cuts to the boundaries of Gold Butte National Monument to free up a water district that he thought shouldn't have been included in the boundaries. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)
March 12, 2019 - 3:27 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — As Democrats in Congress prepare to scrutinize President Donald Trump's review of 27 national monuments, most of the recommendations made by ex-Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke remain unfinished, seemingly stuck on the backburner as other matters consume the White House. Trump...
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FILE - In this Saturday, Dec. 17, 2011, file photo, scallop meat is shucked at sea off Harpswell, Maine. The state's scallop harvest declined by about a third in 2018, marking the first time in several years that the valuable fishery has taken a step back. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
March 09, 2019 - 10:33 am
ROCKPORT, Maine (AP) — Maine's scallop harvest declined by about a third in 2018, marking the first time in several years that the valuable fishery has taken a step back. The Pine Tree State's scallop harvest is a drop in the bucket within the worldwide scallop industry, but the state's scallops...
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FILE-In this Sept. 3, 2018 file photo, a lobster walks on the ocean floor near a lobster trap off Biddeford, Maine. Maine officials say lobstermen brought more than 119 million pounds (54 million kilograms) of the state's signature seafood ashore in 2018, with the second-highest value on record. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File
March 01, 2019 - 12:26 pm
ROCKPORT, Maine (AP) — Maine lobstermen brought more than 119 million pounds (54 million kilograms) of the state's signature seafood ashore last year, an increase that helped to propel the total value of Maine's seafood to the second-highest value on record, state officials said Friday. The value...
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February 23, 2019 - 1:29 pm
REYKJAVIK, Iceland (AP) — Iceland's whaling industry will be allowed to keep hunting whales for at least another five years, killing up to 2,130 baleen whales under a new quota issued by the government. The five-year whaling policy was up for renewal when Fisheries Minister Kristjan Juliusson...
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Dutch fishers and their families hold up banners during a protest outside parliament in The Hague, Netherlands, Tuesday, Feb. 12, 2019, supporting electric pulse fishing. Dutch fisherman are lobbying lawmakers in a last-ditch attempt to avert a European Union ban on the practice of using electric shocks to stun fish before scooping them up in nets. (AP Photo/Mike Corder)
February 12, 2019 - 11:27 am
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Dutch fisherman protested Tuesday outside parliament in a last-ditch attempt to avert a European Union ban on the practice of using electric shocks to stun fish before scooping them up in nets. The Dutch fishermen argue that the technique, known as electric pulse...
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January 24, 2019 - 1:56 am
TOKYO (AP) — Japanese whalers are discussing plans ahead of their July 1 resumption of commercial hunting along the northeastern coasts for the first time in three decades. Their preparation follows Japan's decision in December to leave the International Whaling Commission, abandoning hope of...
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FILE- In this Jan. 18, 2014, file photo, an endangered female orca leaps from the water while breaching in Puget Sound west of Seattle, Wash. For years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Salmon researchers perusing data on the website of the Center for Whale Research noticed a startling trend: that for the past two decades, significantly more of the whales have died in even-numbered years than in odd years. In a newly published paper, they speculate that the pattern is related to pink salmon, which return to the waters between Washington state and Canada in enormous numbers every other year. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
January 19, 2019 - 5:29 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Over the years, scientists have identified dams, pollution and vessel noise as causes of the troubling decline of the Pacific Northwest's resident killer whales. Now, they may have found a new and more surprising culprit: pink salmon. Four salmon researchers were perusing data on the...
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