Computer viruses and worms

FILE - In this Wednesday, April 22, 2015, file photo, Stijn Vanveerdeghem, left, an engineer with Cisco, shows graphics with live wireless traffic to FedEx employee Barry Poole during the RSA Conference in San Francisco, where threat analysts, security vendors and corporate IT administrators gathered to talk about malicious software, spear-phishing and other attacks that can steal money or secrets from companies and consumers. As the Friday, May 12, 2017, global cyberextortion attack that held people’s computer files hostage slows, authorities are working to catch the crooks behind it, which is a difficult task that involves searching for digital clues and following the money. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez, File)
May 16, 2017 - 10:21 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Cybersecurity experts are pointing to circumstantial evidence that North Korea may be behind the global "ransomware" attack: the way the hackers took hostage computers and servers across the world was similar to previous cyberattacks attributed to North Korea. Simon Choi,...
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A customer walks by the notice about "ransomware" at CGV theater in Seoul, South Korea, Monday, May 15, 2017. The letters read "Due to ransomware affection, we are unable to screen advertisement. The movie is going to start 10 minutes after the ticket time." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
May 16, 2017 - 7:00 am
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries (all times local): 6:30 p.m. Security researchers say China's fondness for pirated software left it especially vulnerable to the latest global cyberattack. Beijing has tolerated rampant use of...
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CORRECTS FROM HUTCHIS TO HUTCHINS -British IT expert Marcus Hutchins who has been branded a hero for slowing down the WannaCry global cyber attack, during an interview in Ilfracombe, England, Monday, May 15, 2017. Hutchins thwarted the virus that took computer files hostage around the world, including the British National Health computer network, telling The Associated Press he doesn’t consider himself a hero but fights malware because “it’s the right thing to do.’’ (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
May 15, 2017 - 8:14 pm
ILFRACOMBE, England (AP) — A young British computer expert credited with cracking the WannaCry cyberattack told The Associated Press he doesn't consider himself a hero but fights malware because "it's the right thing to do." In his first face-to-face interview, Marcus Hutchins, who works for Los...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 7:10 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands of more computers on Monday as people logged in at work, disrupting business, schools, hospitals and daily life, though no new large-scale breakdowns were reported. In Britain, whose health service was among the first high-...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 6:35 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack spread to thousands of more computers on Monday as people logged in at work, disrupting business, schools, hospitals and daily life, though no new large-scale breakdowns were reported. In Britain, whose health service was among the first high-...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 5:01 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers. The full extent of the damage from the...
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A patient takes a nap on her wheelchair as she waits with others at the registration desk at Dharmais Cancer Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Monday, May 15, 2017. Global cyber chaos was spreading Monday as companies booted up computers at work following the weekend's worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack. The extortion scheme created chaos in 150 countries and could wreak even greater havoc as more malicious variations appear. (AP Photo/Dita Alangkara)
May 15, 2017 - 4:50 am
TOKYO (AP) — The worldwide "ransomware" cyberattack wreaked havoc in hospitals, schools and offices across the globe on Monday. Asia reported thousands of new cases but no large-scale breakdowns as workers started the week by booting up their computers. The full extent of the damage from the...
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FILE - This April 12, 2016 file photo shows the Microsoft logo in Issy-les-Moulineaux, outside Paris, France. The cyberextortion attack hitting dozens of countries was a “perfect storm” of sorts. It combined a known and highly dangerous security hole in Microsoft Windows, tardy users who didn’t apply Microsoft’s March software fix, and a software design that allowed the malware to spread quickly once inside university, business and government networks. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
May 15, 2017 - 12:26 am
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries on Friday (all times local): 4:50 a.m. Chinese state media say more than 29,000 institutions across China have been infected by the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Xinhua News Agency reports that by Saturday...
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FILE - This April 12, 2016 file photo shows the Microsoft logo in Issy-les-Moulineaux, outside Paris, France. The cyberextortion attack hitting dozens of countries was a “perfect storm” of sorts. It combined a known and highly dangerous security hole in Microsoft Windows, tardy users who didn’t apply Microsoft’s March software fix, and a software design that allowed the malware to spread quickly once inside university, business and government networks. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
May 14, 2017 - 11:45 pm
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries on Friday (all times local): 4:50 a.m. Chinese state media say more than 29,000 institutions across China have been infected by the global "ransomware" cyberattack. Xinhua News Agency reports that by Sunday...
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FILE - This April 12, 2016 file photo shows the Microsoft logo in Issy-les-Moulineaux, outside Paris, France. The cyberextortion attack hitting dozens of countries was a “perfect storm” of sorts. It combined a known and highly dangerous security hole in Microsoft Windows, tardy users who didn’t apply Microsoft’s March software fix, and a software design that allowed the malware to spread quickly once inside university, business and government networks. (AP Photo/Michel Euler, File)
May 14, 2017 - 7:24 pm
LONDON (AP) — The latest on the global extortion cyberattack that hit dozens of countries on Friday (all times local): 12:20 a.m. Microsoft's top lawyer is laying some of the blame for Friday's massive cyberattack at the feet of the U.S. government. Brad Smith criticized U.S. intelligence agencies...
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