Conservation laws and regulations

FILE - This July 9, 2017 file photo, shows a view of Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah. The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around the Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized is light on new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does include a few more safeguards than were in a proposal last year. A summary the Bureau of Land Management provided to The Associated Press shows that the plan for the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southwestern Utah codifies that the lands cut out of the monument will be open to mineral extraction such as oil, gas and coal as expected. (Spenser Heaps/The Deseret News via AP, File)
August 23, 2019 - 2:04 am
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The U.S. government's final management plan for lands in and around a Utah national monument that President Donald Trump downsized doesn't include many new protections for the cliffs, canyons, waterfalls and arches found there, but it does have a few more safeguards than were...
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FILE - In this May 13, 2019 file photo provided by the National Park Service is a female condor in Zion National Park, Utah. Seven environmental and animal protection groups have filed the first lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's recent rollbacks to the Endangered Species Act. Their lawsuit filed Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2019, in federal court in San Francisco comes after the federal government announced last week it was rescinding some protections for wildlife. (National Park Service via AP, File)
August 21, 2019 - 6:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Seven environmental and animal protection groups teamed up to file the first lawsuit challenging the Trump administration's rollback of the Endangered Species Act. The environmental law nonprofit Earthjustice filed the lawsuit Wednesday on behalf of the Center for Biological...
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A monarch butterfly is silhouetted suspended near its empty chrysalis soon after emerging in Washington, Sunday, June 2, 2019. Farming and other human development have eradicated state-size swaths of its native milkweed habitat, cutting the butterfly's numbers by 90% over the last two decades. It is now under considered for listing under the Endangered Species Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
August 14, 2019 - 8:52 am
GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — Hand-raising monarch butterflies in the midst of a global extinction crisis, Laura Moore and her neighbors gather round in her suburban Maryland yard to launch a butterfly newly emerged from its chrysalis. Eager to play his part, 3-year-old Thomas Powell flaps his arms and...
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FILE - In this Feb. 1, 2016 file photo, a bald eagle takes flight at the Museum of the Shenandaoh Valley in Winchester, Va. While once-endangered bald eagles are booming again in the Chesapeake Bay, the overall trajectory of endangered species and the federal act that protects them isn't so clearcut. (Scott Mason/The Winchester Star via AP, File)
August 12, 2019 - 6:28 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions . The action, which expands the administration's rewrite of...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo President Donald Trump listens as Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during an event on the environment in the East Room of the White House in Washington. The Trump administration has finalized changes to enforcement of the landmark Endangered Species Act, a move it says will improve transparency and effectiveness but critics say will drive more creatures to extinction. Bernhardt unveiled the changes Monday. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
August 12, 2019 - 3:20 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's changes to the Endangered Species Act (all times local): 3:20 p.m. California and Massachusetts say they'll go to court to fight the Trump administration's overhaul of the Endangered Species Act. Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey...
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In this Tuesday, July 9, 2019 photo Northern Arizona University researcher Matt Johnson looks for tamarisk beetles along the Verde River in Clarkdale, Ariz. The beetles were brought to the U.S. from Asia to devour invasive tamarisk, or salt cedar, trees. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)
July 26, 2019 - 8:16 pm
CLARKDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves. He counts spiders, ants and leafhoppers among the catch and few...
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FILE - In this July 8, 2019 file photo President Donald Trump listens as Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt speaks during an event on the environment in the East Room of the White House in Washington. A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit. U.S. Rep. Raúl Grijalva is leading an investigation into the proposed 28,000-home development. Bernhardt had an unofficial meeting when he was deputy secretary with developer Mike Ingram, Arizona Diamondbacks co-owner and a prominent GOP donor. Interior officials deny politics played a part in the permit. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
July 10, 2019 - 6:19 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — A congressional committee is investigating whether the U.S. Interior Department helped an Arizona developer and supporter of President Donald Trump get a crucial permit after a wildlife official said the housing project would threaten habitat for imperiled species. U.S. Rep. Raúl...
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June 19, 2019 - 12:46 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The federal government says two species of herring are not at risk of going extinct, and will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the government has finished a review of the status of alewife and blueback...
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FILE - This February 2017 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a wolf of the Wenaha Pack captured on a remote camera on U.S. Forest Service land in Oregon's northern Wallowa County. A federal proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list has divided states in the West, and has even exposed conflicting views among top officials in Oregon. The governor said Thursday, May 16, 2019, it's critically important that range-wide recovery efforts for wolves across the West be maintained. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File)
May 16, 2019 - 6:56 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The gray wolf is on track for a remarkable comeback after being almost exterminated in the contiguous United States, but a Trump administration proposal to take the iconic symbol of the wild off the endangered species list has exposed divisions among states. California says it...
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In this 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the American burying beetle handled in Rock Island, R.I. U.S. wildlife officials say the endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened. The beetle was listed as endangered in 1989 after its historic range over 35 states and three Canadian provinces shrank to just eastern Oklahoma and Block Island off the cost of Rhode Island. Officials say populations now also can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, Texas, and on Nantucket Island off the coast of Massachusetts. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 6:13 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials said Wednesday a large scavenging beetle that has been classified as endangered since 1989 has become more plentiful and should be downlisted to threatened, a decision that environmentalists said is not justified by scientific data. The American...
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