Death penalty controversy

FILE - In this Nov. 17, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump talks with then California Gov.-elect Gavin Newsom during a visit to a neighborhood destroyed by the wildfires in Paradise, Calif. Gov. Newsom is wrapping up a first year highlighted by the bankruptcy of the country's largest utility, an escalating homelessness crisis and an intensifying feud with the Trump administration, along with record-low unemployment and a booming state economy producing a multi-billion-dollar surplus. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
December 30, 2019 - 9:34 am
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — During his inaugural address last January, California Gov. Gavin Newsom made only a passing reference to wildfires and never mentioned the state's largest utility, Pacific Gas & Electric. Both soon became inescapable topics. PG&E filed for bankruptcy barely three...
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FILE - This undated Pennsylvania Department of Transportation photo shows Robert Bowers. Federal prosecutors announced in August they would seek the death penalty for Bowers who is charged with killing 11 people inside the tree of Life synagogue. Bowers had offered to plead guilty in exchange for a life sentence. (Pennsylvania Department of Transportation via AP, File)
December 28, 2019 - 7:21 am
Lawyers for the suspect in the synagogue shooting that killed 11 people in Pittsburgh have challenged his potential death sentence as unconstitutional. Lawyers for Robert Bowers argued in court papers filed this week that capital punishment violates the Fifth Amendment’s due process clause and the...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 05, 2019 - 10:22 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A blind prisoner convicted of killing his estranged girlfriend by setting her on fire in her car was put to death Thursday in Tennessee's electric chair, becoming only the second inmate without sight to be executed in the U.S. since the reinstatement of the nation's death...
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FILE - This 2017 file photo provided by the Tennessee Department of Correction shows Lee Hall, formerly known as Leroy Hall Jr. Hall, a death row inmate. Hall is scheduled to be electrocuted Thursday, Dec. 5, 2019. Hall walked onto death row nearly three decades ago with his sight, but attorneys for the 53-year-old prisoner say he’s since become functionally blind due to improperly treated glaucoma. (Tennessee Department of Correction via AP)
December 04, 2019 - 4:20 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee announced Wednesday that he won't stop the state from putting a blind inmate to death in the electric chair later this week, clearing the way for the execution unless a federal court intervenes. Lee Hall, a 53-year-old inmate who became blind from...
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November 27, 2019 - 1:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawyers for a federal death row inmate convicted of rape and murder have asked a federal judge to halt his scheduled execution next month because the prisoner has Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. Wesley Ira Purkey’s lawsuit was filed late Tuesday in Washington. His execution...
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Pope Francis, center, prepares to leave after meeting with Japan's Emperor Naruhito, right, at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, Monday, Nov. 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Koji Sasahara)
November 25, 2019 - 4:25 am
TOKYO (AP) — The Latest on Pope Francis’ visit to Japan (all times local): 5 p.m. A former Japanese professional boxer who spent 48 years in prison for murders he says he did not commit was among some 50,000 people greeting Pope Francis as he entered Tokyo Dome stadium to conduct Mass on Monday...
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FILE - In this Oct. 11, 2019 file photo, a view of the E. Barrett Prettyman United States Courthouse in Washington. A federal judge in the District of Columbia has temporarily halted the first federal execution in 16 years as a lawsuit on how the government intends to carry it out continues. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
November 21, 2019 - 1:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A judge has temporarily halted the first federal executions in 16 years, saying death row inmates scheduled to be executed are likely to win their legal challenge. U.S. District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan said in a Wednesday evening ruling that the public is not served by “short-...
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Rodrick Reed leads a chant during a protest against the execution of Rodney Reed on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 2019, in Bastrop, Texas. Reed is scheduled to be executed Nov. 20, but a growing number of politicians and celebrities have joined calls to further examine Reed's case before his execution proceeds. (Nick Wagner/Austin American-Statesman via AP)
November 15, 2019 - 6:07 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — Texas’ top appeals court on Friday halted the scheduled execution of inmate Rodney Reed, whose conviction is being questioned by new evidence that his supporters say raises serious doubt about his guilt. The stay of execution issued Friday afternoon by the Texas Court of Criminal...
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This undated file photo made available by the Georgia Department of Corrections, shows inmate Ray Jefferson Cromartie in custody. Cromartie is scheduled to be executed Wednesday evening, Nov. 13, 2019, at the state prison in Jackson, Ga. He was convicted of malice murder and sentenced to death for April 1994’s slaying of Richard Slysz at a Thomasville, Ga., convenience store. (Georgia Department of Corrections via AP, File)
November 13, 2019 - 9:03 pm
JACKSON, Ga. (AP) — Georgia correctional authorities were set to execute a man Wednesday evening for the fatal shooting of a convenience store clerk 25 years ago. Ray Jefferson Cromartie, 52, was scheduled to receive a lethal injection after 7 p.m. but that hour passed with no immediate response...
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FILE - This undated file photo provided by the Missouri Department of Corrections shows Russell Bucklew. Bucklew is scheduled to die by injection Oct. 1, 2019 for killing a southeast Missouri man during a violent crime rampage in 1996. Bucklew suffers from a rare medical condition that causes blood-filled tumors in his head, neck and throat, and he had a tracheostomy tube inserted in 2018. His attorneys say he faces the risk of a "grotesque execution process." Missouri Gov. Mike Parson, who is considering clemency in the execution for tomorrow. (Missouri Department of Corrections via AP File)
October 01, 2019 - 11:39 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — A Missouri inmate was executed Tuesday for killing a man in 1996 in a string of violence that included several other crimes, despite concerns that the prisoner's rare medical condition would cause a gruesome lethal injection. Russell Bucklew was put to death at the state prison in...
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