Drug abuse

FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, a pharmacy tech poses for a picture with hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, the generic version of Vicodin in Edmond, Okla. A report released Wednesday, May 31, 2017 traces how a short letter in a medical journal in 1980 helped sow the seeds of today's opioid epidemic by helping to convince doctors that these powerful painkillers carried less risk of addiction than they actually do. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
May 31, 2017 - 5:37 pm
Nearly 40 years ago, a respected doctor wrote a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine with some very good news: Out of nearly 40,000 patients given powerful pain drugs in a Boston hospital, only four addictions were documented. Doctors had been wary of opioids, fearing patients would get...
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FILE - In this Thursday, May 4, 2017, file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, after the House pushed through a health care bill. On May 9, 2017, Price said, “If we just simply substitute buprenorphine or methadone or some other opioid-type medication for the opioid addiction, then we haven't moved the dial much.” But in an opinion piece published May 17 in the Charleston Gazette-Mail, he twice mentioned his agency’s support for medication-assisted treatment. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 22, 2017 - 1:26 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Remarks by a top U.S. health official have reignited a quarrel in the world of addiction and recovery: Does treating opioid addiction with medication save lives? Or does it trade one addiction for another? Health Secretary Tom Price's recent comments — one replying to a reporter's...
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May 16, 2017 - 5:58 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Top Republicans in the North Carolina Senate say their state budget amendment in the wee hours to expand opioid abuse treatment wasn't drawn up to punish Democrats for proposing several changes of their own after midnight. Republican budget-writers located over $1 million from...
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California Highway Patrol Sgt. Jaimi Kenyon, swabs the inside of her mouth to collect saliva during a demonstration of drug testing device Wednesday, May 10, 2017, in Sacramento, Calif. Three of California's largest counties are testing a device that can detect the presence of drugs in saliva within five minutes. Some officers and lawmakers want the devices used statewide after voters passed Proposition 64 in November, legalizing the recreational use of marijuana. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 10, 2017 - 8:20 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Police in three California counties are testing what amounts to a breathalyzer for drug users — a device that some authorities and lawmakers said Wednesday is desperately needed now that voters have legalized recreational marijuana in the state. When legalization takes...
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In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 5:18 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
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In this Monday, March 13, 2017 photo, Ian Lewis, poses in the lobby of Hope Academy in Indianapolis. Lewis wants to be a vet someday. His owl-and-skull tattoo remind him to be wiser than two user friends who overdosed and a third who died driving drunk. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
April 25, 2017 - 1:38 am
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — When Logan Snyder got hooked on pills after a prescription to treat pain from a kidney stone, she joined the millions already swept up in the nation's grim wave of addiction to opioid painkillers. She was just 14. Youth is a drawback when it comes to kicking drugs. Only half of...
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This April 6, 2017, photo, shows cars parked outside Paisley Park Museum, former home and recording studio of the late megastar Prince in Chanhassen, Minn. Affidavits and search warrants were unsealed in Carver County District Court Monday, April 17, 2017, as the yearlong investigation into Prince's death continues. (AP Photo/Jeff Baenen)
April 18, 2017 - 1:23 am
Before his death, Prince abused opioid pain pills, suffered withdrawal symptoms and received at least one opioid prescription under his bodyguard's name, according to search warrants and affidavits unsealed Monday. Prince was 57 when he was found alone and unresponsive in an elevator at Paisley...
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FILE - In this Feb. 18, 1985 file photo, Prince performs at the Forum in Inglewood, Calif. A year after Prince died of an accidental drug overdose, his Paisley Park studio complex and home is now a museum and concert venue. Fans can now stream most of his classic albums, and a remastered "Purple Rain" album is due out in June 2017 along with two albums of unreleased music and two concert films from his vault. (AP Photo/Liu Heung Shing, File)
April 17, 2017 - 6:42 pm
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Court documents unsealed in the investigation into Prince's death suggest a doctor and a close friend helped him improperly obtain prescription opioid painkillers, but they shed no new light on how the superstar got the fentanyl that killed him. The affidavits and search warrants...
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Heidi Wyandt, 27, puts on her coat to leave the Altoona Center for Clinical Research in Altoona, Pa., on Wednesday, March 29, 2017, where she is helping test an experimental non-opioid pain medication for chronic back pain related to a work related injury she received in 2014. With about 2 million Americans hooked on opioid painkillers, researchers and drug companies are searching for less addictive drugs to treat pain. (AP Photo/Chris Post)
April 17, 2017 - 1:30 am
Tummy tucks really hurt. Doctors carve from hip to hip, slicing off skin, tightening muscles, tugging at innards. Patients often need strong painkillers for days or even weeks, but Mary Hernandez went home on just over-the-counter ibuprofen. The reason may be the yellowish goo smeared on her 18-...
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President Donald Trump shakes hands with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie during an opioid and drug abuse listening sessionWednesday, March 29, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
March 29, 2017 - 7:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is vowing to step up efforts to combat the nation's opioid addiction crisis, and he's tapped New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie to lead the fight. Trump convened an emotional roundtable Wednesday with Christie, members of his Cabinet, law enforcement chiefs,...
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