Drug addiction

August 24, 2017 - 8:23 am
TRUMP Within 24 hours, a pair of wildly different Trump speeches RENO, Nev. (AP) — President Donald Trump can shift dramatically in tone from one speech to the next. Within a 24-hour span, Trump delivered one speech in which he tore into the media and members of his own party, and a second in which...
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Forrest Wood, 24, injects heroin into his arm under a bridge along the Wishkah River at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Wood grew up here, watching drugs take hold of his relatives, and he swore to himself that he would get out of this place, maybe spend his days in the woods as a park ranger. But he started taking opioid painkillers as a teenager, and before he knew it he was shooting heroin, a familiar first chapter in the story of American addiction. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
August 21, 2017 - 1:28 pm
ABERDEEN, Wash. (AP) — One-hundred-fifty baskets of pink petunias hang from the light posts all over this city, watered regularly by residents trying to make their community feel alive again. A local artist spends his afternoons high in a bucket truck, painting a block-long mural of a little girl...
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Forrest Wood, 24, injects heroin into his arm under a bridge along the Wishkah River at Kurt Cobain Memorial Park in Aberdeen, Wash., Tuesday, June 13, 2017. Wood grew up here, watching drugs take hold of his relatives, and he swore to himself that he would get out of this place, maybe spend his days in the woods as a park ranger. But he started taking opioid painkillers as a teenager, and before he knew it he was shooting heroin, a familiar first chapter in the story of American addiction. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
August 21, 2017 - 8:00 am
ABERDEEN, Wash. (AP) — One-hundred-fifty baskets of pink petunias hang from the light posts all over this city, watered regularly by residents trying to make their community feel alive again. A local artist spends his afternoons high in a bucket truck, painting a block-long mural of a little girl...
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FILE - This Oct. 19, 2016, file photo shows the packaging of Vivitrol at an addiction treatment center in Joliet, Ill. A new study finds only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance. The research suggests that doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth in the opioid addiction epidemic. The study was published Monday, June 19, 2017, in JAMA Pediatrics. (AP Photo/Carla K. Johnson, File)
June 19, 2017 - 12:14 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — A new study finds only 1 in 4 teens and young adults with opioid addiction receive recommended treatment medication despite having good health insurance. The research suggests that doctors are not keeping up with the needs of youth in the opioid addiction epidemic. The study was...
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June 16, 2017 - 5:41 pm
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper has told a White House panel on fighting opioid and drug addiction that "we cannot arrest our way" out of the problem. Cooper said Friday in Washington that consensus and common sense are needed to find solutions that include substance abuse...
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June 01, 2017 - 1:44 pm
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's lieutenant governor revealed Thursday that her two sons have struggled with opioid addiction, adding her family to the thousands known to be affected by the nation's prescription painkiller and heroin epidemic. "Like many Ohioans, my family is struggling with addiction...
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FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010 file photo, a pharmacy tech poses for a picture with hydrocodone bitartrate and acetaminophen tablets, the generic version of Vicodin in Edmond, Okla. A report released Wednesday, May 31, 2017 traces how a short letter in a medical journal in 1980 helped sow the seeds of today's opioid epidemic by helping to convince doctors that these powerful painkillers carried less risk of addiction than they actually do. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
May 31, 2017 - 5:37 pm
Nearly 40 years ago, a respected doctor wrote a letter to the New England Journal of Medicine with some very good news: Out of nearly 40,000 patients given powerful pain drugs in a Boston hospital, only four addictions were documented. Doctors had been wary of opioids, fearing patients would get...
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FILE - In this Thursday, May 4, 2017, file photo, Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, after the House pushed through a health care bill. On May 9, 2017, Price said, “If we just simply substitute buprenorphine or methadone or some other opioid-type medication for the opioid addiction, then we haven't moved the dial much.” But in an opinion piece published May 17 in the Charleston Gazette-Mail, he twice mentioned his agency’s support for medication-assisted treatment. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
May 22, 2017 - 1:26 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Remarks by a top U.S. health official have reignited a quarrel in the world of addiction and recovery: Does treating opioid addiction with medication save lives? Or does it trade one addiction for another? Health Secretary Tom Price's recent comments — one replying to a reporter's...
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In this Jan. 19, 2017, handout photo from the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center, nurse Amanda Fritsch checks the catheter delivering a drug that kept Stuart Anders’ injured leg numb for three days. Called a nerve block, the non-addictive numbing treatment substantially cut the amount of opioid painkillers that Anders otherwise would have been prescribed for his shattered femur. (University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center via AP)
May 02, 2017 - 5:18 am
BALTIMORE (AP) — A car crash shattered Stuart Anders' thigh, leaving pieces of bone sticking through his skin. Yet Anders begged emergency room doctors not to give him powerful opioid painkillers — he'd been addicted once before and panicked at the thought of relapsing. "I can't lose what I worked...
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In this Monday, March 13, 2017 photo, Ian Lewis, poses in the lobby of Hope Academy in Indianapolis. Lewis wants to be a vet someday. His owl-and-skull tattoo remind him to be wiser than two user friends who overdosed and a third who died driving drunk. (AP Photo/Michael Conroy)
April 25, 2017 - 1:38 am
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — When Logan Snyder got hooked on pills after a prescription to treat pain from a kidney stone, she joined the millions already swept up in the nation's grim wave of addiction to opioid painkillers. She was just 14. Youth is a drawback when it comes to kicking drugs. Only half of...
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