Earth science

FILE - In this July 27, 2018, file photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. The Trump administration announced on Wednesday, June 19, 2019, that it has rolled back a landmark Obama-era effort targeting coal-fired power plants and their climate-damaging pollution. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
June 19, 2019 - 8:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid scientists' increasingly urgent warnings, the Trump administration ordered a sweeping about-face Wednesday on Obama-era efforts to fight climate change, easing restrictions on coal-fired power plants in a move it predicted would revitalize America's sagging coal industry. As...
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This Jan. 3 1976 photo made by the National Reconnaissance Office shows Mount Everest at center. This and other once-classified Cold War era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to. (National Reconnaissance Office via AP)
June 19, 2019 - 2:02 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Cold War-era spy satellite images are showing scientists that glaciers on the Himalayas are now melting about twice as fast as they used to. The Asian mountain range, which includes Mount Everest, has been losing ice at a rate of about 1% a year since 2000, according to a study...
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FILE - In this March 29, 2013, file photo, a worker helps monitor water pumping pressure and temperature, at an oil and natural gas extraction site, outside Rifle, on the Western Slope of Colorado. A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
June 14, 2019 - 11:39 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. The request from William Happer, a member of the National...
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Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper listens to a question during a media availability at the National Press Club, Thursday, June 13, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
June 13, 2019 - 1:34 pm
DENVER (AP) — A carbon tax is part of the climate plan that Democratic presidential candidate John Hickenlooper is backing. He's the latest candidate to outline a plan to combat global warming. Along with the carbon tax, the former Colorado governor would spend $350 billion on green infrastructure...
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FILE-In this Feb. 12, 2014 file photo Bitcoin buttons are displayed on a table at the Inside Bitcoins conference in Berlin. Researchers calculate that the electricity required for the virtual currency bitcoin generates as much carbon dioxide as cities like Las Vegas or Hamburg. (AP Photo/Frank Jordans)
June 13, 2019 - 11:06 am
BERLIN (AP) — The virtual currency bitcoin is responsible for the same amount of carbon dioxide emissions as a city like Las Vegas or Hamburg and efforts to reduce its climate footprint should be considered, researchers said Thursday. A study by researchers at the Technical University of Munich and...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 12:45 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A new study says the world's oceans will likely lose about one-sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path. A comprehensive computer-based study by an international team of marine biologists found that for every...
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June 01, 2019 - 11:14 am
CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Scientists at the College of Charleston are getting ready for a project to map cracks deep underground and get a better idea where earthquakes may happen in South Carolina. Geologist Scott Harris says the project will fly a plane in a grid pattern from Kingstree to Edisto...
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In this May 24, 2019 photo, teachers and students from Northwest Montessori School in Seattle examine the carcass of a gray whale after it washed up on the coast of Washington's Olympic Peninsula, just north of Kalaloch Campground in Olympic National Park. Federal scientists on Friday, May 31 opened an investigation into what is causing a spike in gray whale deaths along the West Coast this year. So far, about 70 whales have stranded on the coasts of Washington, Oregon, Alaska and California, the most since 2000. (AP Photo/Gene Johnson)
May 31, 2019 - 7:50 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — U.S. scientists said Friday they will investigate why an unusual number of gray whales are washing up dead on West Coast beaches. About 70 whales have been found dead so far this year on the coasts of California, Oregon, Washington and Alaska, the most since 2000. About five more...
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FILE - This Feb. 21, 2012, file photo, shows equipment in the oil fields of the Uintah Basin, southeast of Vernal, Utah. A federal judge said Wednesday, May 29, 2019, U.S. officials must consider the climate change effects from leasing about 250 square miles of public lands in Colorado and Utah for oil and gas exploration. (Trent Nelson/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)
May 29, 2019 - 6:54 pm
DENVER (AP) — U.S. officials must consider climate change effects from leasing about 250 square miles (648 sq. kilometers) of public lands in Colorado and Utah for oil and gas drilling, under a federal court ruling issued Wednesday. The order from U.S. District Judge Rudolph Contreras in Washington...
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