Endangered and extinct species

June 19, 2019 - 12:46 am
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — The federal government says two species of herring are not at risk of going extinct, and will not be listed under the Endangered Species Act. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the government has finished a review of the status of alewife and blueback...
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In this undated photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Mexican gray wolf interagency field team shows Mexican gray wolf pups that are part of a cross-fostering program in which pups born in captivity are placed with packs in the wild in Arizona and New Mexico. (The Interagency Field Team/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
June 18, 2019 - 6:47 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It's a carefully planned mission that involves coordination across state lines — from Mexican gray wolf dens hidden deep in the woods of New Mexico and Arizona to breeding facilities at zoos and special conservation centers around the U.S. It's also about timing as wolves...
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The head of an Ice Age wolf, at the Mammoth Fauna Study Department at the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia, Russia, June 10, 2019. Experts believe the wolf roamed the earth about 40,000 years ago, but thanks to Siberia's frozen permafrost its brain, fur, tissues and even its tongue have been perfectly preserved, as scientific investigations are underway after it was found in August 2018. (Valery Plotnikov/Mammoth Fauna Study Department at the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia via AP)
June 13, 2019 - 2:42 pm
MOSCOW (AP) — Russian scientists have found the furry head of an Ice Age wolf perfectly preserved in the Siberian permafrost. The head of a wolf, which died 40,000 years ago, was discovered in the Russian Arctic region of Yakutia. Valery Plotnikov, a top researcher at the local branch of the...
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FILE - A Mexican gray wolf is seen at the Endangered Wolf Center Monday, May 20, 2019, in Eureka, Mo. Mexican gray wolves have been blamed for killing nearly as many cows and calves in the first four months of 2019 as they did all of last year. Federal wildlife managers have documented 88 livestock kills from January through April in New Mexico and Arizona. Nearly 100 were reported for all of 2018. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)
May 27, 2019 - 4:46 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It's shaping up to be a deadly year for livestock in the American Southwest as the number of cows and calves killed by Mexican gray wolves has skyrocketed, aggravating an already tenuous relationship between U.S. wildlife managers, environmentalists and rural residents...
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This April 29, 2019 photo provided by the United States Geological Survey shows a grizzly bear and a cub along the Gibbon River in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Wildlife officials say grizzly bear numbers are holding steady in the Northern Rockies as plans to hunt the animals in two states remain tied up in a legal dispute. (Frank van Manen/The United States Geological Survey via AP)
May 24, 2019 - 7:57 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials asked a federal appeals court on Friday to overturn part of a judge's ruling that blocked the first grizzly bear hunts in the Lower 48 states in almost three decades. The case before the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals involves more than 700 grizzly bears in...
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A female red wolf emerges from her den sheltering newborn pups at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, N.C., on Monday, May 13, 2019. The Associated Press found that over the last two decades, more than half of Mexican wolf deaths and about one in four red wolf deaths resulted from gunshots or were otherwise deemed illegal. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)
May 23, 2019 - 12:06 am
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Illegal killings and political resistance have undercut the return of two species of endangered wolves despite more than $80 million in government spending. Wildlife officials warn the red wolves of North Carolina could be gone from the wild within a decade. In the Southwest,...
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In this photo taken Monday, May 13, 2019, a sign for Sonoita stands in the heart of southeastern Arizona where owners of wineries and other small tourism operations worry that the Rosemont Copper Mine proposed to be built in the nearby Santa Rita Mountains could harm their businesses with mining trucks rumbling down scenic state highway 83 that runs past the range. Native American tribes are seeking an injunction to halt work on the copper mine project they say will desecrate burial and other sacred sites in the Santa Rita Mountains of southeastern Arizona. (AP Photo/Anita Snow)
May 19, 2019 - 11:17 am
SONOITA, Ariz. (AP) — Native American tribes and environmental groups are fighting to stop a Canadian firm from opening a copper mine in southeastern Arizona, arguing it could desecrate sacred, ancestral lands and pollute the air and water. Opponents of the Rosemont Mine say they worry the project...
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FILE - This February 2017 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife shows a wolf of the Wenaha Pack captured on a remote camera on U.S. Forest Service land in Oregon's northern Wallowa County. A federal proposal to take the gray wolf off the endangered species list has divided states in the West, and has even exposed conflicting views among top officials in Oregon. The governor said Thursday, May 16, 2019, it's critically important that range-wide recovery efforts for wolves across the West be maintained. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File)
May 16, 2019 - 6:56 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — The gray wolf is on track for a remarkable comeback after being almost exterminated in the contiguous United States, but a Trump administration proposal to take the iconic symbol of the wild off the endangered species list has exposed divisions among states. California says it...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2018, file photo, a couple walks through a forest with the Frankfurt skyline in background near Frankfurt, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
May 07, 2019 - 10:30 am
You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is in trouble, estimated 1 million species are...
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FILE - In this Dec. 14, 2011, file photo, a lemur looks through the forest at Andasibe-Mantadia National Park in Andasibe, Madagascar. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Jason Straziuso, File)
May 06, 2019 - 12:23 pm
People are putting nature in more trouble now than at any other time in human history, with extinction looming over 1 million species of plants and animals, scientists said Monday. But it's not too late to fix the problem, according to the United Nations' first comprehensive report on biodiversity...
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