Energy and the environment

August 16, 2017 - 9:39 pm
SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Hyundai Motor says its new hydrogen fuel cell vehicle will travel more than 580 kilometers (360 miles) between fill-ups. The South Korean company said Thursday its second-generation fuel-cell SUV will be launched early next year. If delivered as promised, Hyundai's...
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August 16, 2017 - 2:59 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — Missouri utility regulators on Wednesday rejected a proposed high-voltage power line to carry wind power across the Midwest to eastern states, delivering a significant setback to developers of one of the nation's longest transmission lines. The decision marked the second...
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August 15, 2017 - 10:10 am
ROCKY MOUNT, N.C. (AP) — The public is getting more formal opportunities to speak up about a proposed natural gas pipeline running through eastern North Carolina. The state Department of Environmental Quality scheduled three "listening sessions" this week on the Atlantic Coast Pipeline project,...
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August 14, 2017 - 3:41 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency says it plans to scrap an Obama-era measure limiting water pollution from coal-fired power plants. A letter from EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt released Monday as part of a legal appeal says he will seek to revise the 2015 guidelines mandating...
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August 09, 2017 - 4:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal scientists warn that burning fossil fuels is already driving a steep increase in the United States of heat waves, droughts and floods — even as President Donald Trump touts new oil pipelines and pledges to revive the nation's struggling coal mines. A draft report...
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FILE - In this Nov. 15, 2016, file photo, a haul truck with a 250-ton capacity carries coal from the Spring Creek strip mine near Decker, Mont. As President Donald Trump touts new oil pipelines and pledges to revive the nation’s struggling coal mines, federal scientists are warning that burning fossil fuels is already driving a steep increase in the United States of heat waves, droughts and floods. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)
August 09, 2017 - 3:09 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal scientists warn that burning fossil fuels is already driving a steep increase in the United States of heat waves, droughts and floods — even as President Donald Trump touts new oil pipelines and pledges to revive the nation's struggling coal mines. A draft report...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2005 file photo, a sage grouse is seen near Fallon, Nev. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says a new federal plan to protect the threatened sage grouse will better align with conservation efforts in 11 Western states where the bird lives. (AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)
August 08, 2017 - 6:44 am
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West. Wildlife advocates warn that the proposed changes would undercut a hard-won...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2005 file photo, a sage grouse is seen near Fallon, Nev. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke says a new federal plan to protect the threatened sage grouse will better align with conservation efforts in 11 Western states where the bird lives. (AP Photo/Cathleen Allison, File)
August 08, 2017 - 3:39 am
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration has opened the door to industry-friendly changes to a sweeping plan imposed by his predecessor to protect a ground-dwelling bird across vast areas of the West. Wildlife advocates warn that the proposed changes would undercut a hard-won...
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FILe - In this Sept. 16, 2016 file photo, a cap for a containment building for the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station is shown near Jenkinsville, S.C., during a media tour of the facility. South Carolina’s utilities are abandoning two partly-built nuclear reactors. And they want permission to charge customers another $5 billion to cover their costs. An environmentalist says that money could have gone to renewable energy. Others say nuclear is key to cooling the planet and won’t exist if the federal government doesn’t finance it. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
August 05, 2017 - 6:45 pm
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A decade ago, utilities were persuading politicians around the country to let them spend big to go nuclear. Expanding nuclear energy capacity was a sure bet, they said: Natural gas prices were rising, energy needs skyrocketing, and the federal government was poised to cripple...
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August 05, 2017 - 9:26 am
COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — A decade ago, utilities were persuading politicians around the country to let them spend big to go nuclear. It was a sure bet, they said, since natural gas was expensive, electricity demand was skyrocketing and the government was poised to cripple fossil-fuel plants. State...
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