Engineering

A worker walks past tornado-damaged Toyotas at a dealership in Jefferson City, Mo., Thursday, May 23, 2019, after a tornado tore though late Wednesday. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)
May 24, 2019 - 2:47 am
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — An outbreak of nasty storms spawned tornadoes that razed homes, flattened trees and tossed cars across a dealership lot, injuring about two dozen people in Missouri's capital city and killing at least three others elsewhere in the state. The National Weather Service...
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People re-created the historic photo of the meeting of the rails from May 10, 1869, during the commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Transcontinental Railroad completion at the Golden Spike National Historical Park Friday, May 10, 2019, in Promontory, Utah. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)
May 10, 2019 - 7:34 pm
PROMONTORY, Utah (AP) — Music, bells and cannon fire rang out Friday at a remote spot in the Utah desert where the final spikes of the Transcontinental Railroad were hammered 150 years ago, uniting a nation long separated by vast expanses of desert, mountains and forests and fresh off the Civil War...
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FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2017, file photo, a VICIS Zero1 helmet is displayed in New York. In an annual study, designed by NFL- and NFLPA-appointed biomechanical engineers, rotational velocity and acceleration are measured to evaluate helmets to determine which helmets best reduced head impact severity. The VICIS Zero1 was top rated. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
May 10, 2019 - 4:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Did some helmet manufacturers design models with the purpose of testing well rather than performing properly on the field? Possibly, but the lab testing by the biomechanical engineers appointed by the league and its players' union accounted for such a practice in the rankings for...
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FILE - In this file photo taken Feb. 21, 2019, seventh grade students from Grace Academy in Hartford, Conn., work together on a robot using plans on a computer at the Connecticut Science Center in Hartford. Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America's girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data made public Tuesday, April 30, 2019. (Jim Michaud/Journal Inquirer via AP, File)
April 30, 2019 - 1:25 am
SEATTLE (AP) — Though less likely to study in a formal technology or engineering course, America's girls are showing more mastery of those subjects than their boy classmates, according to newly released national education data. Known as "The Nation's Report Card," the latest findings made public...
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Recent floodwaters from the Platte River filled the Nebraska National Guard's primary training base, Camp Ashland, with sand, water and debris Thursday, March 28, 2019, near Ashland, Nebraska. (Ryan Soderlin/Omaha World-Herald via AP)
April 03, 2019 - 4:16 pm
COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa (AP) — U.S. Army Corps of Engineers officials were set to meet Wednesday with the governors of four flood-ravaged Midwestern states amid criticism of the federal agency for its management of swollen waterways. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts and Missouri Gov...
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Toyota’s basketball robot Cue 3 demonstrates Monday, April 1, 2019 at a gymnasium in Fuchu, Tokyo. The 207-centimeter (six-foot-10) -tall machine made five of eight three-pointer shots in a demonstration in a Tokyo suburb Monday, a ratio its engineers say is worse than usual. Toyota Motor Corp.’s robot, called Cue 3, computes as a three-dimensional image where the basket is, using sensors on its torso, and adjusts motors inside its arm and knees to give the shot the right angle and propulsion for a swish.(AP Photo/Yuri Kageyama)
April 01, 2019 - 2:26 am
TOKYO (AP) — It can't dribble, let alone slam dunk, but Toyota's basketball robot hardly ever misses a free throw or a 3-pointer. The 207-centimeter (six-foot, 10-inch)-tall machine made five of eight 3-point shots in a demonstration in a Tokyo suburb Monday, a ratio its engineers say is worse than...
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Workplace bullying claimant David Hingst covers his face as he leaves the Court of Appeal in Melbourne, Australia Friday, March 29, 2019. The Australian appeals court on Friday dismissed a bullying case brought by the engineer Hingst who accused his former supervisor of repeatedly breaking wind toward him. (Ellen Smith/AAP Image via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 3:29 am
MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) — An Australian appeals court on Friday dismissed a bullying case brought by an engineer who accused his former supervisor of repeatedly breaking wind toward him. The Victoria state Court of Appeal upheld a Supreme Court judge's ruling that even if engineer David Hingst's...
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March 25, 2019 - 11:23 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan has authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to begin planning and building 57 miles of 18-foot-high fencing in Yuma, Arizona, and El Paso, Texas, along the U.S. border with Mexico. The Pentagon says it will divert up to $1 billion to...
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March 03, 2019 - 10:47 am
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — Those interested in the Army Corps of Engineers' plan for the New Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam in Augusta are getting more time to comment on the project. The Augusta Chronicle reports the Corps is extending the time the city of Augusta has to respond by 30 days, to April 16...
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FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2017 file photo shows the town of Cannon Ball, N.D., on the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation. The Native American tribe leading the fight against the Dakota Access oil pipeline said Thursday, Feb. 28, 2019, an Army Corps of Engineers document shows the agency concluded the pipeline wouldn't unfairly affect tribes before it consulted them. The Standing Rock Sioux officials say the document bolsters the tribe's claim that the Corps disregarded a federal judge's order to seriously review the pipeline's potential impact on the Standing Rock Sioux and three other Dakotas-based tribes and to not treat the study as a "bureaucratic formality." (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)
March 02, 2019 - 9:52 am
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — Tribes battling the Dakota Access oil pipeline in court are accusing the Army Corps of Engineers of withholding dozens of documents that could bolster their case that the pipeline could unfairly impact them. Attorneys for the four Sioux tribes allege some records that are...
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