Entomology

FILE - In this Feb. 12, 2011 file photo a bison from Yellowstone National Park walks through the snow shortly before being shot and killed during a hunt by members of an American Indian tribe, near Gardiner, Mont. U.S. officials have rejected a petition to protect the park's roughly 4,500 bison, which are routinely hunted and sent to slaughter to guard against the spread of disease to cattle. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
September 05, 2019 - 8:04 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials rejected petitions Thursday to protect Yellowstone National Park's storied bison herds but pledged to consider more help for two other species — a tiny, endangered squirrel in Arizona and bees that pollinate rare desert flowers in Nevada. Wildlife...
Read More
Cheryl Hayashi uses a microscope to work on a spider in her lab at the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Hayashi has collected spider silk glands of about 50 species, just a small dent in the more than 48,000 spider species known worldwide. (AP Photo/Jeremy Rehm)
August 14, 2019 - 9:13 am
NEW YORK (AP) — With two pairs of fine-tipped tweezers and the hands of a surgeon, Cheryl Hayashi began dissecting the body of a silver garden spider under her microscope. In just a few minutes she found what she was seeking: hundreds of silk glands, the organs spiders use to make their webs. Some...
Read More
An aerial photo taken Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Bethany Beach, Del., shows a wooden road built on pilings in one of the freshwater wetlands in coastal Delaware where the Bethany Beach Firefly, which some environmentalists want added to the federal Endangered Species List, has been previously found. (AP Photo/Gary Emeigh)
August 02, 2019 - 9:24 am
BETHANY BEACH, Del. (AP) — Peering through the darkness under the faint light of a peach-colored moon, wildlife biologist Jason Davis spots a telltale green flash in the bushes. Quick as a flash himself, Davis arcs a long-handled mesh net through the humid coastal air, ensnaring his tiny target...
Read More
In this Tuesday, July 9, 2019 photo Northern Arizona University researcher Matt Johnson looks for tamarisk beetles along the Verde River in Clarkdale, Ariz. The beetles were brought to the U.S. from Asia to devour invasive tamarisk, or salt cedar, trees. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca)
July 26, 2019 - 8:16 pm
CLARKDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Matt Johnson treks along an Arizona riverbank and picks out a patch of yellow-tinged tamarisks. He sweeps a cloth net across the trees, hoping to scoop up beetles that munch on their evergreen-like leaves. He counts spiders, ants and leafhoppers among the catch and few...
Read More
May 11, 2019 - 2:35 pm
Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
Read More
In this 2015 photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the American burying beetle handled in Rock Island, R.I. U.S. wildlife officials say the endangered carnivorous beetle is making a comeback and should be downlisted to threatened. The beetle was listed as endangered in 1989 after its historic range over 35 states and three Canadian provinces shrank to just eastern Oklahoma and Block Island off the cost of Rhode Island. Officials say populations now also can be found in Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, South Dakota, Texas, and on Nantucket Island off the coast of Massachusetts. (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP)
May 01, 2019 - 6:13 pm
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Federal wildlife officials said Wednesday a large scavenging beetle that has been classified as endangered since 1989 has become more plentiful and should be downlisted to threatened, a decision that environmentalists said is not justified by scientific data. The American...
Read More
This 2018 photo provided by the University of New Hampshire shows a ground nesting bee pollinating a flower in New Hampshire. The species is one of 14 declining wild bee species identified in a study published in April 2019 by researchers at the university. The new study has found that more than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating fruits and vegetables across New England are on the decline. (University of New Hampshire/Molly Jacobson via AP)
April 18, 2019 - 11:25 am
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — More than a dozen wild bee species critical to pollinating everything from blueberries to apples in New England are on the decline, according to a new study. Researchers from the University of New Hampshire wanted to understand if the documented declines hitting honeybees and...
Read More
March 09, 2019 - 8:50 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Tawny crazy ants are pushing fire ants out of some Louisiana sugar cane fields - one of the few places people are happy to see fire ants. Entomologists worry that the new invaders could hurt the crop. Fire ants chomp away at one of the crop's worst pests -- a moth larva called...
Read More
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 2015 file photo, an ailing butterfly rests on a plant at the monarch butterfly reserve in Piedra Herrada, Mexico State, Mexico. Millions of monarchs migrate from the United States and Canada each year to pine and fir forests to the west of the Mexican capital. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)
January 30, 2019 - 2:39 pm
MEXICO CITY (AP) — The population of monarch butterflies wintering in central Mexico is up 144 percent over last year, experts said Wednesday. The data presented by Andrew Rhodes, Mexico's national commissioner for protected natural areas, was cheered but scientists quickly warned that it does not...
Read More
FILE- In this Aug. 19, 2015 photo, Tom Merriman stands behind a monarch in his butterfly atrium at his nursery in Vista, Calif. Researchers with an environmental group are labeling as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it says is an 86 percent decline since 2017. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
January 06, 2019 - 3:27 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Researchers with an environmental group have labeled as "disturbingly low" the number of western monarch butterflies that migrate along the California coast. A recent count by the Xerces Society recorded fewer than 30,000 butterflies, which it said is an 86 percent decline...
Read More

Pages