Environmental concerns

In this artist rendering provided by Robots in Service of the Environment, a new robot that hunts the dangerous and invasive lionfish made its debut in Bermuda in April. It stuns lionfish with an electric current and then the fish is vacuumed into a container alive and it can later be sold for food. The robot caught 15 lionfish in 48 hours of initial testing. Handout photo courtesy of Robots In Service of the Environment. (Robots in Service of the Environment via AP
April 28, 2017 - 4:28 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A robot zaps and vacuums up venomous lionfish in Bermuda. A helicopter pelts Guam's trees with poison-baited dead mice to fight the voracious brown tree snake. A special boat with giant winglike nets stuns and catches Asian carp in the U.S. Midwest. In the fight against alien...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2004, file photo, a gray wolf is seen at the Wildlife Science Center in Forest Lake, Minn. Wyoming is looking ahead to its first wolf-hunting season in four years now that a court has lifted endangered species protection for wolves in the state. (AP Photo/Dawn Villella, File)
April 26, 2017 - 7:13 pm
CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Wyoming will hold a wolf hunt for the first time in four years this fall now that a federal court has lifted endangered species protection for wolves in the state, the Wyoming Game and Fish Department said Wednesday. Planning is now underway for the hunt in northwestern...
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Far-right French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen is greeted by workers outside a whirlpool home appliance factory in Amiens, France, Wednesday April 26, 2017. While her centrist presidential opponent Macron was meeting with union leaders from the Whirlpool plant in northern France, Le Pen popped up outside the factory itself, amid its workers and declared herself the candidate of France's workers.(AP Photo)
April 26, 2017 - 10:48 am
AMIENS, France (AP) — Battling for France's blue-collar vote and employing all of her political guile, far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen upstaged her centrist rival Emmanuel Macron by making a surprise campaign stop Wednesday to a home appliance factory threatened with closure. As...
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FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a Mexican gray wolf leaves cover at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, N.M. The Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, lifted a preliminary injunction that had prevented the Fish and Wildlife Service from releasing more Mexican gray wolves. (Jim Clark/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
April 25, 2017 - 8:27 pm
DENVER (AP) — A federal court on Tuesday removed an obstacle to the U.S. government's plan to release more endangered wolves in New Mexico over the state's objections, but it was not clear whether additional animals would be reintroduced under the Trump administration. The Denver-based 10th U.S...
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FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a Mexican gray wolf leaves cover at the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, N.M. The Denver-based 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on Tuesday, April 25, 2017, lifted a preliminary injunction that had prevented the Fish and Wildlife Service from releasing more Mexican gray wolves. (Jim Clark/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via AP, File)
April 25, 2017 - 8:04 pm
DENVER (AP) — A federal court on Tuesday removed an obstacle to the U.S. government's plan to release more endangered wolves in New Mexico over the state's objections, but it was not clear whether additional animals would be reintroduced under the Trump administration. The Denver-based 10th U.S...
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FILE - In this Dec. 30, 2016 file photo, a man looks up near smoke spewing from a chimney near the Jiujiang steel and rolling mills in Qianan in northern China's Hebei province. Researchers say Tuesday, April 25, 2017 that China's conversion of coal into natural gas could prevent tens of thousands of premature deaths annually. But there's a catch: It also could undermine efforts to rein in greenhouse gas emissions. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
April 25, 2017 - 12:00 am
BEIJING (AP) — China's conversion of coal into natural gas could prevent tens of thousands of premature deaths each year. But there's a catch: As the country shifts its use of vast coal reserves to send less smog-inducing chemicals into the air, the move threatens to undermine efforts to rein in...
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FILE - In this July 20, 2016 file photo, an Iraqi man cools off the summer heat by using an open air shower in Baghdad, Iraq. Most people on Earth have already felt extreme and record heat, drought or downpours goosed by man-made global warming, a new study finds. (AP Photo/Karim Kadim, File)
April 24, 2017 - 3:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Most people on Earth have already felt extreme and record heat, drought or downpours goosed by man-made global warming, new research finds. In a first-of-its-kind study, scientists analyzed weather stations worldwide and calculated that in 85 percent of the cases, the record for...
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April 24, 2017 - 2:29 pm
EUREKA, Mo. (AP) — A Mexican wolf born this month at a wildlife center in suburban St. Louis is offering new hope for repopulating the endangered species through artificial insemination using sperm that had been frozen. The Mexican wolf population once numbered in the thousands but was nearly wiped...
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FILE - In this Feb. 16, 2016 file photo, a man carries a young boy over his shoulder as he walks among beach goers enjoying unusually warm winter temperatures in Encinitas, Calif. Global warming’s milder winters will likely nudge Americans off the couch more in the future, a rare, small benefit of climate change, a new study finds. (AP Photo/Lenny Ignelzi, File)
April 24, 2017 - 11:03 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming's milder winters will likely nudge Americans off the couch more in the future, a rare, small benefit of climate change, a new study finds. With less chilly winters, Americans will be more likely to get outdoors, increasing their physical activity by as much as 2.5...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 27, 2016, file photo, former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg waves after speaking to delegates during the third day session of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. The former New York City mayor addressed his intensifying focus on climate change on Saturday, April 22, 2017, in an email interview with The Associated Press. Bloomberg said he wants to help save an international agreement to reduce carbon emissions. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
April 23, 2017 - 4:49 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — New York billionaire Michael Bloomberg urged world leaders not to follow President Donald Trump's lead on climate change and declared his intention to help save an international agreement to reduce carbon emissions. Bloomberg, who considered a presidential bid after serving three...
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