Environmental concerns

FILE - In this April 3, 2014 file photo giant machines dig for brown coal at the open-cast mining Garzweiler in front of a power plant near the city of Grevenbroich in western Germany. The UN Climate Change Conference 2017 will take place under Presidency of the Government of Fiji in Bonn, Germany and starts on Monday, Nov. 6, 2017. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File)
October 31, 2017 - 11:02 am
GENEVA (AP) — The head of the U.N. environment program said Tuesday the United States is likely to live up to the Paris climate deal despite President Donald Trump's planned pullout, because "all the big American companies" are working toward greener operations. The comments from UNEP executive...
Read More
FILE - In this Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017 file photo, a patient suffering from dengue fever lies in a hospital bed in Peshawar, Pakistan. Cases of dengue fever _ a painful mosquito-borne spread disease _ have doubled every decade since 1990 with 58.4 million cases and 10,000 deaths in 2013. Dr. Howard Frumkin, a former environmental health director at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said climate change, which allows mosquitoes to live in more places and stay active longer with shorter freeze seasons, is part but not all of the reason. (AP Photo/Muhammad Sajjad)
October 30, 2017 - 8:10 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Global warming is hurting people's health a bit more than previously thought, but there's hope that the Earth — and populations — can heal if the planet kicks its coal habit, a group of doctors and other experts said. The poor and elderly are most threatened by worsening climate...
Read More
This Oct. 23, 2017, photo provided by Scott Babcock shows a seal that wound up on the runway at the airport in Utiqiagvik, Alaska. A sled was brought in to remove the seal in the community formerly known as Barrow, Alaska. (Scott Babcock via AP)
October 28, 2017 - 7:19 am
A HIPPOPOTAMUS SPOTTED US: FIONA THE HIPPO WATCHES AS COUPLE GET ENGAGED CINCINNATI (AP) — The Cincinnati Zoo's popular baby hippo, Fiona, has drawn a lot of love but perhaps none quite like this moment: From her exhibit, she got a front-row seat to a wedding proposal between two of her fans. A...
Read More
October 27, 2017 - 4:55 pm
ST. LOUIS (AP) — St. Louis aldermen have approved a measure committing the city to transition to 100 percent clean, renewable energy by 2035. The measure approved Friday calls for the city to develop a plan by December 2018 to meet the clean energy goal by working with residents, businesses, faith-...
Read More
FILE--In this Oct. 16, 2017, file photo, Jenny Parks, CEO of the Los Alamos National Laboratories Foundation, criticizes a proposed overhaul of New Mexico's state science standards for public schools that would omit or delete references to global warming, evolution and the age of the Earth, at a public hearing in Santa Fe, N.M. Public education officials in New Mexico have retreated from proposed science standards that would have deleted or omitted references to evolution, human contributions to global warming and Earth's age. (AP Photo/Morgan Lee, file)
October 27, 2017 - 4:13 pm
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Public education officials in New Mexico have retreated from proposed science standards that would have deleted or omitted references to evolution, human contributions to global warming and Earth's age. Scores of scientists and engineers from Los Alamos National Laboratory —...
Read More
Water from New York Harbor surrounds the southern tip of New York's Manhattan borough on Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, seen from aboard a Staten Island Ferry. Superstorm Sandy roared ashore five years ago, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, devastating the coastlines of New Jersey, New York and parts of Connecticut and becoming one of the costliest storms in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
October 27, 2017 - 4:08 pm
Five years after Superstorm Sandy was supposed to have taught the U.S. a lesson about the dangers of living along the coast, disaster planning experts say there is no place in America truly prepared for climate change and the tempests it could bring. That is true even in New York and New Jersey,...
Read More
FILE - This Monday, Oct. 23, 2017 file photo show fall colors beginning to show along Route 209 in Reilly Township, Schuylkill County, Pa. Across the United States, 2017’s first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar, according to more than a century of measurements from weather stations nationwide. (David McKeown/Republican-Herald via AP)
October 27, 2017 - 4:07 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Winter is coming ... later. And it's leaving ever earlier. Across the United States, the year's first freeze has been arriving further and further into the calendar, according to more than a century of measurements from weather stations nationwide. Scientists say it is yet another...
Read More
October 26, 2017 - 9:46 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Staff and funding shortages and poor data management are preventing Michigan environmental regulators from making sure that state residents have safe drinking water, federal officials said Thursday. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said deficiencies in Michigan's...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2015 file photo provided by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, an ODFW biologist is in the process of collaring wolf OR-33, a 2-year-old adult male from the Imnaha pack, in Oregon's Wallowa County. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and five conservation groups are teaming up to offer $15,500 for information about the illegal poaching of federally protected gray wolf OR-33, who was found dead near Klamath Falls on April 23. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, file)
October 25, 2017 - 2:52 pm
KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (AP) — The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and five conservation groups have teamed up to offer $15,500 for information about the illegal poaching of a federally protected gray wolf that was shot dead in a national forest in southern Oregon. The wolf, known as OR-33, was being...
Read More
FILE - In this Feb. 6, 2014, file photo, Chase Iron Eyes, an attorney and American Indian activist on the Standing Rock Reservation, is seen in Fort Yates, N.D. Iron Eyes, who is accused of inciting a riot during protests against the Dakota Access pipeline says he'll seek to present a "necessity defense." That's justifying a crime by arguing it prevented a greater harm. Iron Eyes has pleaded not guilty to inciting a riot and criminal trespass. He could face more than five years in prison if convicted at trial in February 2018. (AP Photo/Kevin Cederstrom, File)
October 25, 2017 - 1:27 pm
BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — An American Indian activist and former U.S. congressional candidate in North Dakota accused of inciting a riot during protests against the Dakota Access oil pipeline says he'll seek to present a "necessity defense" — justifying a crime by arguing it prevented a greater harm...
Read More

Pages