Environmental concerns

March 27, 2019 - 5:09 am
BEIRA, Mozambique (AP) — Long before Cyclone Idai roared in and tore apart Mozambique's seaside city of Beira, the mayor dreamed of protecting his people from climate change. It would be a huge challenge. Large parts of the city of 500,000 residents are below sea level on a coastline that experts...
Read More
Professor John All, center, of Western Washington University, and his team pose for the photograph at a hotel before leaving for Everest region, in Kathmandu, Nepal, Wednesday, March 27, 2019. A team of American scientists is heading to the Mount Everest region to study how pollution has impacted the Himalayas and glaciers that are melting due to global warming. The team plans to spend the next two months in the region and climb the world's highest peak while they collect samples and study the ice, snow and vegetation.(AP Photo/Niranjan Shrestha)
March 27, 2019 - 4:09 am
KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — A team of American scientists flew to the Mount Everest region Wednesday to study how pollution has impacted the Himalayan mountains and glaciers that are melting due to global warming. The team led by John All of Western Washington University plans to spend the next two...
Read More
This 2016 photo provided by NASA shows patches of bare land at the Jakobshavn glacier in Greenland. The major Greenland glacier that was one of the fastest shrinking ice and snow masses on Earth is growing again, a new NASA study finds. The Jakobshavn glacier around 2012 was retreating about 1.8 miles (3 kilometers) and thinning nearly 130 feet (almost 40 meters) annually. But the last two years it started growing again at about the same rate, according to a study released on Monday, March 25, 2019, in Nature Geoscience. Study authors and outside scientists think this is temporary. (NASA via AP)
March 25, 2019 - 1:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A major Greenland glacier that was one of the fastest shrinking ice and snow masses on Earth is growing again, a new NASA study finds. The Jakobshavn (YA-cob-shawv-en) glacier around 2012 was retreating about 1.8 miles (3 kilometers) and thinning nearly 130 feet (almost 40 meters...
Read More
FILE - The first load of nuclear waste arrives in this March 26, 1999 file photo, at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in Carlsbad, N.M., from Los Alamos National Laboratory. Twenty years and more than 12,380 shipments later, tons of Cold War-era waste from decades of bomb-making and nuclear research across the U.S. have been stashed in the salt caverns that make up the underground facility. (AP Photo/Thomas Herbert)
March 23, 2019 - 6:53 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — It wasn't long after the atomic bomb was dropped on Japan and World War II ended that the United States began to realize it had to do something with the waste that was being generated by defense-related nuclear research and bomb-making that would continue through the Cold...
Read More
Young people protest for climate action with a sign reading 'Save the World Now" during a 'Friday for Future' demonstration in Berlin, Germany, Friday, March 22, 2019. (Christoph Soeder/dpa via AP)
March 22, 2019 - 1:13 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union leaders on Friday pushed back a decision on the bloc's long-term efforts to fight climate change, with some countries opposing a pledge to end most emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050. Leaders meeting in Brussels agreed to discuss the issue again at their next...
Read More
In this May 25, 2017 file photo, baby eels, also known as elvers, are held in Brewer, Maine. Elver season begins on Friday, March 22, 2019, with fishermen hoping the big-money season isn't interrupted by poaching concerns as it was in the previous season. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
March 22, 2019 - 12:36 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine fishermen began several weeks of taking to rivers and streams to fish for baby eels Friday, which marked the start of a high-stakes season harvesters hope isn't interrupted by poaching concerns as it was a year ago. Fishermen in Maine use nets to harvest baby eels,...
Read More
This March 17, 2019 photo released by the U.S. Air Force shows an aerial view of Offutt Air Force Base and the surrounding areas affected by flood waters in Neb. Surging unexpectedly strong and up to 7 feet high, the Missouri River floodwaters that poured on to much the Nebraska air base that houses the U.S. Strategic Command overwhelmed the frantic sandbagging by troops and their scramble to save sensitive equipment, munitions and aircraft. (Tech. Sgt. Rachelle Blake/The U.S. Air Force via AP)
March 22, 2019 - 7:12 am
OFFUTT AIR FORCE BASE, Neb. (AP) — The Missouri River floodwater surging on to the air base housing the U.S. military's Strategic Command overwhelmed round-the-clock sandbagging by airmen and others. They had to scramble to save sensitive equipment, munitions and dozens of aircraft. Days into the...
Read More
In this aerial photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, damaged buildings are seen at the site of a factory explosion in a chemical industrial park in Xiangshui County of Yancheng in eastern China's Jiangsu province, Friday, March 22, 2019. The local government reports the death toll in an explosion at a chemical plant in eastern China has risen with dozens killed and more seriously injured. (Ji Chunpeng/Xinhua via AP)
March 22, 2019 - 4:28 am
BEIJING (AP) — A massive explosion at a chemical plant in eastern China with a long record of safety violations has killed at least 47 people and injured hundreds of others, 90 of them seriously. Thursday's blast in an industrial park in the city of Yancheng, north of Shanghai, was one of China's...
Read More
March 20, 2019 - 8:32 pm
WILLIAMSTON, N.C. (AP) — The road rose up to grease some motorists in North Carolina after a tractor-trailer overturned and spilled its load on the highway. The North Carolina Highway Patrol tells WITN in Greenville that the tractor-trailer driver ran a stop sign on a road in Martin County on...
Read More
FILE - In this Jan. 16, 2019 file photo, Andrew Wheeler is shown at a Senate Environment and Public Works Committee hearing to be the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Wheeler is telling CBS News in an interview airing Wednesday morning that climate change is “an important issue,” but that most of the threats it poses are “50 to 75 years out.” (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
March 20, 2019 - 3:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Unsafe drinking water, not climate change, is the world's most immediate public health issue, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Andrew Wheeler contended Wednesday. Environmental groups responded by saying the Trump administration was neglecting — or worsening — both...
Read More

Pages