Environmental laws and regulations

Richard Rennard, president of acrylic monomers, America for Arkema Inc. speaks during a news conference Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, in Crosby, Texas. The Houston-area chemical plant that lost power after Harvey engulfed the area in extensive floods was rocked by multiple explosions early Thursday, the plant's operator said. The Arkema Inc. plant had been left without refrigeration for chemicals that become volatile as the temperature rises. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
September 01, 2017 - 4:58 am
Explosions that rocked a Texas chemical plant after it was inundated by Harvey's floodwaters are raising questions about the adequacy of industry preparations for the monster storm and stoking fears of more accidents in the days ahead. The owners of the plant in Crosby, Texas, warned Thursday that...
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Richard Rennard, president of acrylic monomers, America for Arkema Inc. speaks during a news conference Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, in Crosby, Texas. The Houston-area chemical plant that lost power after Harvey engulfed the area in extensive floods was rocked by multiple explosions early Thursday, the plant's operator said. The Arkema Inc. plant had been left without refrigeration for chemicals that become volatile as the temperature rises. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
September 01, 2017 - 4:42 am
Explosions that rocked a Texas chemical plant after it was inundated by Harvey's floodwaters are raising questions about the adequacy of industry preparations for the monster storm and stoking fears of more accidents in the days ahead. The owners of the plant in Crosby, Texas, warned Thursday that...
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Mike Cossey, of Bureau Veritas, uses an air monitor to check the quality of air at a police roadblock marking the 1.5-mile perimeter of the evacuation area around the Arkema Inc. chemical plant Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, in Crosby, Texas. The Houston-area chemical plant that lost power after Harvey engulfed the area in extensive floods was rocked by multiple explosions early Thursday, the plant's operator said. The Arkema Inc. plant had been left without refrigeration for chemicals that become volatile as the temperature rises. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
August 31, 2017 - 9:13 pm
HOUSTON (AP) — At least 2 tons of highly unstable chemicals used in such products as plastics and paint exploded and burned at a flood-crippled plant near Houston early Thursday, sending up a plume of acrid black smoke that stung the eyes and lungs. The blaze at the Arkema Inc. chemical plant...
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Richard Rennard, president of the acrylic monomers division at Arkema, talks to the media about the explosion of organic peroxide inside the plant Thursday, Aug. 31, 2017, in Crosby, Texas. Explosions and fires rocked a flood-crippled chemical plant near Houston early Thursday, sending up a plume of acrid, eye-irritating smoke and adding a new hazard to Hurricane Harvey's aftermath. (Godofredo A. Vasquez/Houston Chronicle via AP)
August 31, 2017 - 6:42 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration delayed an Obama-era rule that would have tightened safety requirements for companies that store large quantities of dangerous chemicals such as the chemical plant near Houston that exploded early Thursday. The Environmental Protection Agency rule would...
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FILE - This July 6, 2011 file photo shows a grizzly bear roaming near Beaver Lake in Yellowstone National Park, Wyo. Wildlife advocates and a Montana Indian tribe are asking a U.S. court to restore protections for grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park so that trophy hunting of the fearsome animals would not be allowed. (AP Photo/Jim Urquhart, File)
August 30, 2017 - 5:24 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Wildlife advocates and a Montana Indian tribe have asked a U.S. court to restore protections for grizzly bears in and around Yellowstone National Park so that trophy hunting of the fearsome animals would not be allowed. The Northern Cheyenne Tribe, the Humane Society and...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016, file photo, Volkswagen engineer James Robert Liang, left, leaves court, in Detroit, after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy in the company's emissions cheating scandal. U.S. prosecutors are seeking a three-year prison sentence for a Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal. Liang is scheduled to be sentenced Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Detroit federal court. He is one of two VW employees to plead guilty, although others charged in the case are in Germany and out of reach. (Virginia Lozano/Detroit News via AP, File)
August 25, 2017 - 3:14 pm
DETROIT (AP) — A Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal was sentenced Friday to more than three years in prison and a $200,000 fine, a steeper punishment than prosecutors requested. James Robert Liang, 63, knew the German automaker was cheating and worked...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016, file photo, Volkswagen engineer James Robert Liang, left, leaves court, in Detroit, after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy in the company's emissions cheating scandal. U.S. prosecutors are seeking a three-year prison sentence for a Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal. Liang is scheduled to be sentenced Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Detroit federal court. He is one of two VW employees to plead guilty, although others charged in the case are in Germany and out of reach. (Virginia Lozano/Detroit News via AP, File)
August 25, 2017 - 2:42 pm
DETROIT (AP) — The Latest on the criminal investigation into Volkswagen's diesel emissions scandal (all times local): 12:10 p.m. A Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal has been sentenced to more than three years in prison and fined $200,000. The sentence...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016, file photo, Volkswagen engineer James Robert Liang, left, leaves court, in Detroit, after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy in the company's emissions cheating scandal. U.S. prosecutors are seeking a three-year prison sentence for a Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal. Liang is scheduled to be sentenced Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Detroit federal court. He is one of two VW employees to plead guilty, although others charged in the case are in Germany and out of reach. (Virginia Lozano/Detroit News via AP, File)
August 25, 2017 - 2:41 pm
DETROIT (AP) — A Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal was sentenced Friday to more than three years in prison and a $200,000 fine, a steeper punishment than prosecutors requested. James Robert Liang, 63, knew the German automaker was cheating and worked...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016, file photo, Volkswagen engineer James Robert Liang, left, leaves court, in Detroit, after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy in the company's emissions cheating scandal. U.S. prosecutors are seeking a three-year prison sentence for a Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal. Liang is scheduled to be sentenced Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Detroit federal court. He is one of two VW employees to plead guilty, although others charged in the case are in Germany and out of reach. (Virginia Lozano/Detroit News via AP, File)
August 25, 2017 - 1:47 pm
DETROIT (AP) — The Latest on the criminal investigation into Volkswagen's diesel emissions scandal (all times local): 12:10 p.m. A Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal has been sentenced to more than three years in prison and fined $200,000. The sentence...
Read More
FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2016, file photo, Volkswagen engineer James Robert Liang, left, leaves court, in Detroit, after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy in the company's emissions cheating scandal. U.S. prosecutors are seeking a three-year prison sentence for a Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal. Liang is scheduled to be sentenced Friday, Aug. 25, 2017, in Detroit federal court. He is one of two VW employees to plead guilty, although others charged in the case are in Germany and out of reach. (Virginia Lozano/Detroit News via AP, File)
August 25, 2017 - 7:25 am
DETROIT (AP) — U.S. prosecutors will seek a three-year prison sentence on Friday for a Volkswagen engineer who had a key role in the company's diesel emissions scandal. Robert Liang, 63, was one of two VW employees to plead guilty in the scheme, although others charged in the case are in Germany...
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