Environmental science

Ashley Boudreaux ties sandbags Friday, July 12, 2019, in Baton Rouge, La., ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 14, 2019 - 5:03 am
Hurricane Barry could affect the environment of the Gulf coast and Lower Mississippi Valley in numerous ways, from accelerating runoff of farmland nutrients to toppling trees and damaging wildlife habitat and fisheries, scientists say. But the extent of the damage — and whether it will be at least...
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FILE - This file satellite image provided by NASA and taken by U.S. astronaut Christina Koch on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at the International Space Station, shows Tropical Storm Barry as it bears down on Texas, Louisiana, Alabama and the panhandle of Florida as it makes its way through the Gulf of Mexico. Barry could harm the Gulf Coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it’s hard to predict how severe the damage will be. (Christina Koch/NASA via AP, File)
July 13, 2019 - 12:28 am
Tropical Storm Barry could harm the Gulf coast environment in a number of ways. But scientists say it's hard to predict how severe the damage will be. That's because three distinct factors are coming together at once. The storm is expected to create a surge of up to 3 feet (1 meter) and bring...
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The German Arctic research vessel Polarstern is docked for maintenance in Bremerhaven, Germany, Wednesday, July 3, 2019. Scientists from 17 nations are preparing for a year-long mission to the central Arctic to study the impact that climate change is having on the frigid far north of the planet. Mission leader Markus Rex said that researchers plan to anchor the German icebreaker RV Polarstern to a large floe and set up camp on the ice as the sea freezes around them, conducting experiments throughout the Arctic winter. (AP Photos/Frank Jordans)
July 03, 2019 - 6:41 pm
BREMERHAVEN, Germany (AP) — Cranes hoist cargo onto the deck, power tools scream out and workers bustle through the maze of passageways inside the German icebreaker RV Polarstern, preparations for a yearlong voyage that organizers say is unprecedented in scale and ambition. In a couple of months,...
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FILE - In this April 4, 2018 file photo, Kelly Knight Craft, U.S. Ambassador to Canada, speaks about NAFTA and Canada-US relations at an Empire Club meeting in Toronto. Craft is President Donald Trump's nominee to be the next U.S. envoy to the United Nations. (Chris Donovan/The Canadian Press via AP)
June 24, 2019 - 3:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The email went out from senior Environmental Protection Agency officials to Kelly Craft, the U.S. ambassador to Canada, responding to questions she had about a funding matter. But the acknowledgment email the EPA got back a few hours later wasn't from the ambassador. It was from...
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FILE - In this July 27, 2018, file photo, the Dave Johnson coal-fired power plant is silhouetted against the morning sun in Glenrock, Wyo. The Trump administration announced on Wednesday, June 19, 2019, that it has rolled back a landmark Obama-era effort targeting coal-fired power plants and their climate-damaging pollution. (AP Photo/J. David Ake, File)
June 19, 2019 - 8:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid scientists' increasingly urgent warnings, the Trump administration ordered a sweeping about-face Wednesday on Obama-era efforts to fight climate change, easing restrictions on coal-fired power plants in a move it predicted would revitalize America's sagging coal industry. As...
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FILE - In this March 29, 2013, file photo, a worker helps monitor water pumping pressure and temperature, at an oil and natural gas extraction site, outside Rifle, on the Western Slope of Colorado. A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)
June 14, 2019 - 11:39 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails. The request from William Happer, a member of the National...
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FILE - In this Wednesday, July 8, 2015 file photo, herring are unloaded from a fishing boat in Rockland, Maine. A study published Tuesday, June 11, 2019 finds a warmer world may lose a billion tons of fish and other marine life by the end of the century. The international study used computer models to project that for every degree Celsius the world warms, the total weight of life in the oceans drop by 5%. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty, File)
June 11, 2019 - 1:38 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The world's oceans will likely lose about one sixth of its fish and other marine life by the end of the century if climate change continues on its current path, a new study says. Every degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) that the world's oceans warm, the total mass of sea...
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May 21, 2019 - 9:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Long-running research projects credited with pivotal discoveries about the harm that pesticides, air pollution and other hazards pose to children are in jeopardy or shutting down because the Environmental Protection Agency will not commit to their continued funding, researchers...
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In this April 25, 2019, photo, science teacher Sarah Ott speaks to her class about climate literacy in Dalton, Ga. Teachers across the country describe struggles finding trustworthy materials to help them teach their students about climate change. (AP Photo/Sarah Blake Morgan)
May 15, 2019 - 4:45 am
When science teacher Diana Allen set out to teach climate change, a subject she'd never learned in school, she fell into a rabbit's hole of misinformation: Many resources presented online as educational material were actually junk. "It is a pretty scary topic to take on," said Allen, a teacher at...
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FILE - In this Oct. 21, 2018, file photo, a couple walks through a forest with the Frankfurt skyline in background near Frankfurt, Germany. Development that’s led to loss of habitat, climate change, overfishing, pollution and invasive species is causing a biodiversity crisis, scientists say in a new United Nations science report released Monday, May 6, 2019. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)
May 07, 2019 - 10:30 am
You may go your entire life without seeing an endangered species, yet the globe's biodiversity crisis threatens all of humanity in numerous unseen or unrecognized ways, scientists say. A massive United Nations report this week warned that nature is in trouble, estimated 1 million species are...
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