Forensics

FILE - In this Aug. 4, 2011 file photo, Dr. Henry Lee poses for a photograph at the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science on the campus of the University of New Haven in New Haven, Conn. On Thursday, July 11, 2019, the renowned forensic scientist defended the work he did three decades earlier amid new questions about blood evidence in three different murder cases. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
July 11, 2019 - 3:55 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Forensic scientist Henry Lee, who became famous for his testimony in the O.J. Simpson trial and his work on other high-profile murder cases, defended his reputation Thursday after lawyers this week again questioned the accuracy of blood-evidence testimony he gave decades ago...
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FILE - This Sept. 22, 2016 file photo shows the screen of an electronic voting machine during testing at the Kennesaw State University Center for Election Systems in Kennesaw, Ga. Nearly two years ago, state lawyers said they intended to subpoena the FBI for the forensic image, or exact copy, it made of a crucial server before state election officials quietly wiped it clean. Election watchdogs want to examine the data to see if there might have been tampering. A new email obtained by The Associated Press says state officials never did issue the subpoena. (AP Photo/Alex Sanz, File)
July 03, 2019 - 6:03 pm
The case of whether hackers may have tampered with elections in Georgia has taken another strange turn. Nearly two years ago, state lawyers in a closely watched election integrity lawsuit told the judge they intended to subpoena the FBI for the forensic image, or digital snapshot, the agency made...
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William Talbott II, center, in escorted to his seat Friday June 28, 2019 at the Snohomish County Courthouse in Everett, Wash. William Earl Talbott II has been found guilty in the 1987 killings of a young Canadian couple. (Kevin Clark/The Herald via AP)
June 28, 2019 - 8:03 pm
EVERETT, Wash. (AP) — A jury convicted a Washington state man Friday in the killings of a young Canadian couple more than three decades ago — a case that was finally solved when investigators turned to powerful genealogy software to build a family tree of the then-unknown suspect. Tanya Van...
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This June 1, 2019 photo provided by History Flight shows graves of U.S. servicemen under the water table in Tarawa, Kiribati. A nonprofit organization that searches for the remains of U.S. servicemen lost in past conflicts has found what officials believe are the graves of more than 30 Marines and sailors killed in one of the bloodiest battles of World War II. (Eric Albertson/Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency/History Flight via AP)
June 26, 2019 - 6:47 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — An organization that searches for the remains of U.S. servicemen lost in past conflicts has found what officials believe are the graves of more than 30 Marines and sailors killed in one of the bloodiest battles of World War II. A team working on the remote Pacific atoll of Tarawa...
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FILE - In this April 10, 2019, file photo, Regina Wells, foreground right, a forensic laboratories supervisor with the Kentucky State Police, demonstrates new crime-fighting technology in Frankfort, Ky. Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky. Now a state board in Texas has asked a growing government provider of the DNA equipment used in those high-profile projects to halt work amid concerns of potentially jeopardized criminal cases, according to a letter obtained by The Associated Press. (AP Photo/Bruce Schreiner, File)
June 20, 2019 - 7:32 am
AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — With a name that sounds like futuristic fiction, Rapid DNA machines roughly the size of an office printer have helped solve rape cases in Kentucky, identified California wildfire victims and verified family connections of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border. Now a state board in...
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This 2008 drivers license photo released by the Rapid City Police Department shows Eugene Carroll Field. Police say they believe they've solved the murder of a pharmacist who was raped and strangled over 50 years ago in her South Dakota home. Detective Wayne Keefe said Monday, June 17, 2019 that investigators used DNA and genealogy databases to identify Eugene Carroll Field as the person who killed 60-year-old Gwen Miller in Rapid City in 1968. Field died in 2009. (Courtesy of The Rapid City Police Department via AP)
June 18, 2019 - 3:55 pm
RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) — The murder of a pharmacist who was raped and strangled in her home in a South Dakota city more than half a century ago has been solved with the use of DNA technology and genealogy databases, police said. Investigators believe Eugene Carroll Field killed 60-year-old Gwen...
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FILE - This Saturday, May 25, 2019, file photo provided by Cache County Sheriff's Office shows Alex Whipple. Police were able to quickly connect Whipple to the disappearance and death of a 5-year-old Utah girl using a new type of DNA test that can produce results within hours, authorities said. Logan police used a Rapid DNA test to link Alex Whipple to the Saturday disappearance of his niece, Elizabeth "Lizzy" Shelley, KSL-TV reported .(Cache County Sheriff's Office via AP, File)
May 31, 2019 - 9:41 pm
LOGAN, Utah (AP) — Police were able to quickly connect a man to the disappearance and death of a 5-year-old Utah girl using a new type of DNA test that can produce results within hours, authorities said. Logan police used a Rapid DNA test to link Alex Whipple to the Saturday disappearance of his...
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This undated family photo provided by Riccardo Holyfield shows his cousin, Reo Renee Holyfield. Her body was in a dumpster, and nobody found her for two weeks last fall. The slayings like Holyfield's that began in 2001 continued for years and remain unsolved. Now a national nonprofit group and a computer algorithm are helping detectives review the cases and revealing potential connections. The renewed investigation offers hope to the victims' relatives, some of whom have waited nearly two decades for answers. (Courtesy of Riccardo Holyfield via AP)
May 30, 2019 - 1:45 am
CHICAGO (AP) — The bodies turned up in some of Chicago's most derelict places: alleys, abandoned buildings, weed-choked lots and garbage containers. The victims were mostly black women who had been strangled or suffocated. Authorities believed many were prostitutes or drug addicts or both. There...
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FILE - In this May 22, 2016, file photo, former Belgian King Albert II arrives for a tribute ceremony at the Royal Palace in Brussels for the victims of the Brussels attacks. Belgium’s former monarch Albert II has agreed to a DNA test demanded by a woman who claims to be his love child. King Albert II, who abdicated in 2013 for health reasons, is facing a daily fine of 5,000 euros ($5,600) for failing to provide his DNA in the case brought by Delphine Boel. She reacted with relief Tuesday, May 28, 2019 saying that final proof would soon be in the hands of the judiciary. (Frederic Sierakowski/Pool Photo via AP, File)
May 28, 2019 - 2:26 pm
BRUSSELS (AP) — A decades-old royal paternity scandal is setting Belgium abuzz again. Lawyers said Tuesday that Belgium's former King Albert II, 84, has finally agreed to a DNA test demanded by a woman who claims to be his daughter in what could be a decisive breakthrough in the long-running case...
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May 09, 2019 - 9:09 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Police have arrested a man charged with bludgeoning and strangling to death a Hollywood TV director more than three decades ago. Authorities say the FBI arrested Edwin Hiatt Thursday in Burke County, North Carolina, after DNA evidence linked him to the 1985 death of Barry Crane...
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