Fossil fuel power generation

April 12, 2017 - 7:39 pm
PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) — A spill at a U.S. Steel plant in northern Indiana that sent wastewater containing a potentially carcinogenic chemical into a Lake Michigan tributary was apparently caused by a pipe failure but testing has found none of that toxic substance in the lake, the company and federal...
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April 09, 2017 - 8:54 am
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The natural gas boom that has hammered coal mines and driven down utility bills is hitting nuclear power plants, sending multi-billion-dollar energy companies in search of a financial rescue in states where competitive electricity markets have compounded the effect. Fresh off...
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April 09, 2017 - 8:49 am
HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The natural gas boom that's hammered coal mines and driven down utility bills is now hitting nuclear power plants. That's spurring nuclear power plant owners to press lawmakers in Connecticut, New Jersey, Ohio and Pennsylvania for a financial rescue. Their multi-billion-...
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FILE - In this Oct. 9, 2015, file photo, solar panels are seen near the power grid in northwestern China's Ningxia Hui autonomous region. For years, cutting carbon emissions to stave off the worst impacts of climate change was routinely near the top of the agenda at bilateral talks between the leaders of the United States and China. Not anymore. As President Donald Trump hosts President Xi Jinping at his Mar-a-Lago resort in Florida this week, the world’s two largest economies and carbon polluters are taking dramatically divergent paths on climate policy. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
April 06, 2017 - 3:38 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — For years, cutting carbon emissions to stave off the worst impacts of climate change was routinely near the top of the agenda at talks between the leaders of the United States and China. Not anymore. As President Donald Trump hosts President Xi Jinping at his Mar-a-Lago resort in...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump announces the approval of a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline, clearing the way for the $8 billion project in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. From left are, TransCanada CEO Russell K. Girling, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Energy Secretary Rick Perry. Amid staff turmoil and shake-ups, travel bans blocked by federal courts and the Russia cloud hanging overhead, Trump is plucking away at another piece of his agenda: undoing Obama. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
April 03, 2017 - 7:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid the turmoil over staff shake-ups, blocked travel bans and the Russia cloud hanging overhead, President Donald Trump is steadily plugging away at a major piece of his agenda: Undoing Obama. From abortion to energy to climate change and personal investments, Trump is keeping...
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FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump announces the approval of a permit to build the Keystone XL pipeline, clearing the way for the $8 billion project in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. From left are, TransCanada CEO Russell K. Girling, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and Energy Secretary Rick Perry. Amid staff turmoil and shake-ups, travel bans blocked by federal courts and the Russia cloud hanging overhead, Trump is plucking away at another piece of his agenda: undoing Obama. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
April 03, 2017 - 4:12 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Amid the turmoil over staff shake-ups, blocked travel bans and the Russia cloud hanging overhead, President Donald Trump is steadily plugging away at a major piece of his agenda: Undoing Obama. From abortion to energy to climate change and personal investments, Trump is keeping...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, March 28, 2017 file photo, demonstrators gather in front of the White House in Washington, during a rally against President Donald Trump's Energy Independence Executive order. Environmental groups are preparing to go to court to battle Trump's efforts to roll back his predecessor's plans to curb global warming. But they say their first order of business is to mobilize a public backlash against an executive order Trump signed on Tuesday that eliminates many restrictions of fossil fuel production. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
March 29, 2017 - 6:20 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Environmental groups that vowed to fight President Donald Trump's efforts to roll back his predecessor's plans to curb global warming made good on their promise Wednesday, teaming up with an American Indian tribe to ask a federal court to block an order that lifts restrictions on...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, March 28, 2017 file photo, demonstrators gather in front of the White House in Washington, during a rally against President Donald Trump's Energy Independence Executive order. Environmental groups are preparing to go to court to battle Trump's efforts to roll back his predecessor's plans to curb global warming. But they say their first order of business is to mobilize a public backlash against an executive order Trump signed on Tuesday that eliminates many restrictions of fossil fuel production. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
March 29, 2017 - 1:08 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Environmental groups that have hired extra lawyers in recent months are prepared to go to court to fight a sweeping executive order from President Donald Trump that eliminates many restrictions on fossil fuel production and would roll back his predecessor's plans to curb global...
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March 29, 2017 - 12:27 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The largest U.S. electric company says it is suing insurance companies to force them to cover some of its multibillion-dollar costs to clean up the toxic residues left in the Carolinas after decades of burning coal to generate power. Charlotte-based Duke Energy Corp. said...
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FILE - In this Tuesday, March 28, 2017 file photo, demonstrators gather in front of the White House in Washington, during a rally against President Donald Trump's Energy Independence Executive order. Environmental groups are preparing to go to court to battle Trump's efforts to roll back his predecessor's plans to curb global warming. But they say their first order of business is to mobilize a public backlash against an executive order Trump signed on Tuesday that eliminates many restrictions of fossil fuel production. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)
March 29, 2017 - 12:25 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — Environmental groups that have hired extra lawyers in recent months are prepared to go to court to fight a sweeping executive order from President Donald Trump that eliminates many restrictions on fossil fuel production and would roll back his predecessor's plans to curb global...
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