Foster care

Sen. Jeff Yarbro, D-Nashville, debates a proposal allowing faith-based adoption agencies to decline to place children with same-sex couples because of their religious belief without facing penalties on the first day of the 2020 legislative session Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2020, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)
January 14, 2020 - 6:29 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee announced Tuesday that he'll sign into law a measure that would assure continued taxpayer funding of faith-based foster care and adoption agencies even if they exclude LGBT families and others based on religious beliefs. The GOP-controlled Senate gave...
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FILE - This July 31, 2015 file photo shows professional dancer Louis Van Amstel, a former cast member on "Dancing with the Stars," at the 2015 Special Olympics Celebrity Dance Challenge in Beverly Hills, Calif. Amstel's fifth-grade son was berated by a substitute teacher after he said he was thankful that he’s finally going to be adopted by his two dads. The boy’s classmates say the teacher said, “that’s nothing to be thankful for” and lectured the 30 kids in the class about her views on homosexuality. The substitute was escorted from the building. (Photo by John Salangsang/Invision/AP, File)
December 20, 2019 - 3:56 pm
SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A Utah boy is speaking out after being berated by a substitute teacher for saying he was grateful for being adopted by his two dads, one of whom is a professional dancer from “Dancing with the Stars.” Daniel van Amstel, 11, told “CBS This Morning” on Friday that he got angry...
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FILE - In this Oct. 31, 2019, file photo, Rep. Carolyn Maloney, acting chair of the House Committee on Oversight and Reform, joined at left by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, meet with reporters to discuss the next steps of the impeachment investigation of President Donald Trump, at the Capitol in Washington. House Democrats are set to choose who will lead the powerful Oversight and Reform Committee _ a key role in the ongoing impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. Three veteran lawmakers, including Maloney of New York, the acting chairwoman, are seeking to replace the late Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, who died last month. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
December 16, 2019 - 11:48 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government’s 2.1 million employees will get paid parental leave for the first time, a galvanizing moment in the growing movement to bring the benefit to all U.S. workers. The benefit, which gives 12 weeks of paid leave to mothers and fathers of newborns, newly adopted...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 17, 2018, file photo, Christine Gagnon of Southington, Conn., protests with other family and friends who have lost loved ones to OxyContin and opioid overdoses at Purdue Pharma LLP headquarters in Stamford, Conn. Gagnon lost her son Michael 13 months earlier. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma is expected to file for bankruptcy after settlement talks over the nation’s deadly overdose crisis hit an impasse, attorneys general involved in the talks said Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019, in a message to their counterparts across the country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
August 30, 2019 - 7:44 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — An offer from OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and the Sackler family to settle some 2,000 lawsuits over their contribution to the national opioid crisis is receiving growing pushback from state and local officials who say the proposed deal doesn't include enough money or...
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Protesters converge outside the Oregon state Capitol in Salem, Ore. on Thursday, June 27, 2019. Truckers, loggers and farmers say they support the eleven Republican senators who walked out over a week ago to avoid a vote on climate legislation. (AP Photo/Sarah Zimmerman)
June 27, 2019 - 5:53 pm
SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A parade of trucks and tractors circled the Oregon Capitol on Thursday in support of Republican lawmakers who have walked out to block emissions-lowering climate legislation in a political crisis that stretched into an eighth day. All 11 Republican senators were once again...
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Kansas Gov. Laura Kelly answers questions from reporters during a news conference at the Statehouse, Friday, May 10, 2019, in Topeka, Kan. The Kansas Supreme Court has ruled that Kelly didn't have the legal authority to withdraw a state Court of Appeals nominee whose political tweets in 2017 doomed his chances of winning Senate confirmation, meaning the Senate has to formally vote to reject his nomination to keep him off the bench. (AP Photo/John Hanna)
May 17, 2019 - 5:50 pm
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Abused and neglected children are again sleeping overnight in the offices of Kansas foster care contractors because homes cannot be found for them quickly enough. Since January, when Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly took office, more than 70 children have been kept overnight in the...
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In this May 13, 2019 photo, Dana Weiner, policy fellow at Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, discusses a review of the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services' Intact Family Services program, during a press event at DCFS, in Chicago. A study released Wednesday, May 15, 2019, has found that Illinois' child welfare agency is so intent on keeping children with their parents and not putting them in foster care despite strong indications that they've been physically abused or neglected that it has put those children in greater danger. (Ashlee Rezin/Sun Times via AP)/Chicago Sun-Times via AP)
May 15, 2019 - 5:14 pm
SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Illinois's child welfare agency reviewed all 1,100 of its ongoing abuse and neglect cases as part of a stepped-up effort to right a department that's facing criticism for failing to prevent the deaths of three children under its watch since January, the governor announced...
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FILE - This combination of file photos provided on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017, by the Bucks County District Attorney shows Sara Packer, left, and Jacob Sullivan. A jury is considering the death penalty or life in prison for Sullivan in the 2016 rape and murder of 14-year-old Grace Packer, while Grace's mother, Sara Packer, is due to plead guilty, Wednesday, March 27, 2019, to first-degree murder in exchange for a life sentence. (Bucks County District Attorney via AP, File)
March 28, 2019 - 10:41 am
DOYLESTOWN, Pa. (AP) — A man who killed and dismembered his girlfriend's 14-year-old daughter as part of a rape-murder fantasy he shared with the teenager's mother was sentenced to death Thursday. Jacob Sullivan, 46, had pleaded guilty to first-degree murder and related charges for killing Grace...
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FILE - This combination of file photos provided on Sunday, Jan. 8, 2017, by the Bucks County District Attorney shows Sara Packer, left, and Jacob Sullivan. Sullivan pleaded guilty Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019, to first-degree murder in the 2016 death of 14-year-old Grace Packer. Sullivan pleaded guilty to all charges in the 2016 death of Grace Packer. The penalty phase of his trial opens Friday, March 15, 2019 outside Philadelphia. A jury will hear testimony about Sullivan’s crimes before deciding on a sentence of either life in prison or death. (Bucks County District Attorney via AP, File)
March 20, 2019 - 7:43 pm
DOYLESTOWN, Pa. (AP) — The mother of a girl who was raped, murdered and dismembered testified Wednesday that she helped plot the attack and carry it out, telling her daughter before her death that "I can't help you anymore." Appearing to smirk at times, Sara Packer calmly recounted how she watched...
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FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2013, file photo, Veronica, 3, a child at the center of an international adoption dispute at the time, smiles in a bathroom of the Cherokee Nation Jack Brown Center in Tahlequah, Okla. A federal law that gives preference to Native American families in child welfare proceedings involving Native children is facing a significant legal challenge. In 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled the law didn’t apply in a South Carolina case involving Veronica because her Cherokee father was absent from part of her life. (Mike Simons/Tulsa World via AP, File)
March 13, 2019 - 6:09 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A 1978 law giving preference to Native American families in foster care and adoption proceedings involving American Indian children is an unconstitutional race-based intrusion on state powers that has caused families to be "literally torn apart," an attorney told a federal...
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