Freshwater pollution

FILE - In this Nov. 8, 2018, file photo, a lead pipe, left, is seen in a hole the kitchen ceiling in the home of Desmond Odom, in Newark, N.J. The Trump administration is proposing a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead. Contrary to regulatory rollbacks in many other environmental areas, the administration has called dealing with lead contamination in drinking water a priority. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)
October 10, 2019 - 4:24 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday proposed a rewrite of rules for dealing with lead pipes contaminating drinking water, but critics say the changes appear to give water systems decades more time to replace pipes leaching dangerous amounts of toxic lead. Contrary to regulatory...
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FILE - In this Sept. 9, 2010, file photo, a massive fire roars through a neighborhood in San Bruno, Calif. U.S. transportation officials have finalized long-delayed measures meant to prevent pipeline spills and deadly gas explosions but don't address recommended steps to lessen accidents once they occur. They had been in the works for almost a decade following a massive gas explosion in San Bruno. (AP Photo/Paul Sakuma, File)
October 01, 2019 - 7:35 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. transportation officials on Tuesday adopted long-delayed measures that are meant to prevent pipeline spills and deadly gas explosions but don't address recommended steps to lessen accidents once they occur. The new rules from the Department of Transportation apply to...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler, right, signs a document in front of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James to revoke the Waters of the United States rule, an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 12, 2019 - 11:49 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Latest on the Trump administration's plans to revoke an Obama-era clean water rule (all times local): 12:15 p.m. The Trump administration says revoking an Obama-era rule on waters and wetlands would provide "much-needed regulatory certainty" for farmers, homebuilders...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler, right, signs a document in front of Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works R.D. James to revoke the Waters of the United States rule, an Obama-era regulation that provided federal protection to many U.S. wetlands and streams, Thursday, Sept. 12, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
September 12, 2019 - 5:51 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The Trump administration on Thursday revoked an Obama-era regulation that shielded many U.S. wetlands and streams from pollution but was opposed by developers and farmers who said it hurt economic development and infringed on property rights. Environmental groups...
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Environment experts take samples of the Vistula river waters at the site where they are being contaminated with sewage after the city's main sewage treatment plant malfunctioned,in Warsaw, Poland, Thursday, Aug. 29, 2019. The contaminated water is flowing north toward the Baltic Sea and residents on its route have been warned. (AP Photo/Czarek Sokolowski)
August 29, 2019 - 12:28 pm
WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Polish authorities on Thursday were warning residents in cities along the Vistula river that runs into the Baltic Sea of a "crisis" situation after Warsaw's new sewage collection plant malfunctioned. The health minister and local authorities said they have been closely...
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August 02, 2019 - 1:52 pm
CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina hearing officer says a state agency can order the country's largest electric company to excavate all its coal ash pits by 2030 so that they quit polluting neighboring rivers. A state administrative judge on Friday dismissed claims by Duke Energy Corp. that...
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July 29, 2019 - 12:07 pm
TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — Five Democratic governors of states in the Great Lakes region Monday urged the candidates in next year's presidential election to support a plan for safeguarding their shared waters by boosting federal spending on treatment plants and environmental cleanups. Led by...
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FILE - This undated file photo shows Barrick Goldstrike Mines' Betze-Post open pit near Carlin, Nev. A three-judge panel with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia ruled Friday, July 19, 2019, that state and federal programs ensure mining companies take financial responsibility for their pollution. (Adella Harding/The Daily Free Press via AP, File)
July 19, 2019 - 6:54 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A U.S. appeals court panel sided with the Trump administration Friday in a mining pollution dispute, ruling that state and federal programs already in place ensure that companies take financial responsibility for future cleanups. The ruling came after the administration was...
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Water flows through Conowingo Dam, a hydroelectric dam spanning the lower Susquehanna River near Conowingo, Md., on Thursday, May 16, 2019. Officials once counted on the dam to block large amounts of sediment in the Susquehanna from reaching Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary, but the reservoir behind the dam has filled with sediment far sooner than expected. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark)
July 06, 2019 - 9:24 pm
CONOWINGO, Md. (AP) — When the Conowingo Dam opened to fanfare nearly a century ago, the massive wall of concrete and steel began its job of harnessing water power in northern Maryland. It also quietly provided a side benefit: trapping sediment and silt before it could flow miles downstream and...
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Johnny Rowan stands outside Burning River Coffee, Friday, June 14, 2019, in Lakewood, Ohio. Rowan’s is one of 90 active businesses registered with the state that have “burning river” in their names, inspired by the Cuyahoga River’s most famous fire. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak)
June 18, 2019 - 11:17 am
CLEVELAND (AP) — Fifty years after the Cuyahoga River's most infamous fire helped spawn the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, artists and entrepreneurs have turned old jokes into inspiration and forged decades of embarrassment into a fiery brand of Cleveland pride. "Everybody knows Cuyahoga...
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