Freshwater pollution

FILE - In this Jan. 25, 2017 file photo, heavy equipment is used at an ash storage site at Gallatin Fossil Plant in Gallatin, Tenn. The nation’s largest public utility has agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards of coal ash from unlined pits at Gallatin Fossil Plant. In a Thursday, June 13, 2019 settlement, the Tennessee Valley Authority says it will excavate a majority of coal ash at its Gallatin Fossil Plant. .(AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)
June 13, 2019 - 7:06 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The nation's largest public utility on Thursday agreed to dig up and remove about 12 million cubic yards (9.2 million cubic meters) of coal ash from unlined pits at a Tennessee coal-burning power plant. Prompted by two environmental groups, the state sued the Tennessee...
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Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Andrew Wheeler speaks at the National Press Club in Washington, Monday, June 3, 2019. The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found high levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
June 03, 2019 - 2:34 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration's first broad testing of food for a worrisome class of nonstick, stain-resistant industrial compounds found substantial levels in some grocery store meats and seafood and in off-the-shelf chocolate cake, according to unreleased findings FDA...
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FILE - This Aug. 7, 2014, file photo, shows a contract employee watching a crews excavate contaminated soil at a site where millions of gallons of jet fuel leaked underground over decades at Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, N.M. A coalition of state lawmakers and nonprofit groups took the first step toward suing the U.S. Air Force on Friday, May 31, 2019, saying it wants firm deadlines for cleaning up jet fuel contamination at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city. The coalition filed a notice of intent to sue, saying the contamination at Kirtland Air Force Base near Albuquerque is a danger to public health and the environment. It wants an agreement that sets a cleanup schedule with clear deadlines and penalties. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan, File)
May 31, 2019 - 4:54 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A coalition of state lawmakers and nonprofit groups took the first step toward suing the U.S. Air Force on Friday, saying it wants firm deadlines for cleaning up jet fuel contamination at a base bordering New Mexico's largest city. The coalition filed a notice of intent to...
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FILE - In this Monday, April 11, 2016 file photo, New Hampshire state and local officials load boxes of free bottled water in in Litchfield, N.H. New Hampshire is suing eight companies including 3M and Dupont for damage it says has been caused statewide by a class of potentially toxic chemicals found in everything from pizza boxes to fast-food wrappers. The state becomes the second in the nation to go after the makers of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances or PFAS and the first to target statewide contamination. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)
May 29, 2019 - 8:16 pm
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — New Hampshire has sued eight companies including 3M and the DuPont Co. for damage it says has been caused by a class of potentially toxic chemicals found in pizza boxes, fast-food wrappers and drinking water. The substances — known collectively as PFAS — have been used in...
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In this April 8, 2019, photo, Tim Tanksley, who has been fighting for years trying to convince Oklahoma lawmakers to crack down on the coal ash dumping, stands outside a dump site in Bokoshe, Okla. President Donald Trump’s EPA has approved Oklahoma to be the first state to take over permitting and enforcement on coal-ash sites. “They’re going to do absolutely nothing,” Tanksley said. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
May 20, 2019 - 11:50 am
BOKOSHE, Okla. (AP) — Susan Holmes' home, corner store and roadside beef jerky stand are right off Oklahoma Highway 31, putting them in the path of trucks hauling ash and waste from a power plant that burns the high-sulfur coal mined near this small town. For years, when Bokoshe residents were...
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An aerial shot shows widespread destruction caused by Cyclone Kenneth when it struck Ibo island north of Pemba city in Mozambique, Wednesday, May, 1, 2019. The government has said more than 40 people have died after the cyclone made landfall on Thursday, and the humanitarian situation in Pemba and other areas is dire. More than 22 inches (55 centimeters) of rain have fallen in Pemba since Kenneth arrived just six weeks after Cyclone Idai tore into central Mozambique. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
May 02, 2019 - 3:33 pm
IBO ISLAND, Mozambique (AP) — Cyclone Kenneth in northern Mozambique ripped the island of Ibo apart. Nearly a week after the storm roared in, Associated Press journalists found widespread devastation. The aerial approach to the island showed communities flattened. The overwhelming majority of homes...
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FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2018, file photo, trees reflect in a swimming pool outside Erica Hail's Paradise, Calif., home, which burned during the Camp Fire. Water officials say the drinking water in Paradise, which was decimated by a wildfire last year, is contaminated with the cancer-causing chemical benzene. Fixing the problem could cost $300 million and take up to two years. The Sacramento Bee reports Thursday, April 18, 2019, experts believe the extreme heat of the November firestorm created a "toxic cocktail" of gases in burning homes that was sucked into water pipes when the system depressurized. (AP Photo/Noah Berger, File)
April 18, 2019 - 3:10 pm
PARADISE, Calif. (AP) — The drinking water in Paradise, California, where 85 people died in the worst wildfire in state history, is contaminated with the cancer-causing chemical benzene, water officials said. Officials said they believe the contamination happened after the November firestorm...
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FILE - In this Sunday, Dec. 14, 2008 file photo, Italian solo rower Alex Bellini arrives at the Opera House in Sydney, Australia. Italian explorer Alex Bellini plans to travel down the world’s 10 most polluted rivers on make-shift rafts, tracing the routes of plastics that pollute the world’s oceans. Bellini said Thursday April 4, 2019 that he was inspired by a 2018 study by a German scientist that found 80% of plastic in the oceans arrives from just 10 rivers. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith, File)
April 04, 2019 - 4:38 pm
MILAN (AP) — Italian explorer Alex Bellini plans to travel down the world's 10 most polluted rivers on makeshift rafts, tracing the routes of plastics that pollute the world's oceans. Bellini said Thursday that he was inspired by a 2018 study by a German scientist that found 80% of plastic in the...
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In this photo taken Thursday, March 28, 2019, Anne Vierra,with the town of Paradise, takes payment for the first building permit since the Camp Fire as Jason and Meagann Buzzard plan to rebuild their home in Paradise, Calif. Small signs of rebuilding a Northern California town destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permit to rebuild one of the 11,000 homes destroyed in Paradise five months ago. A city hall clerk on Thursday issued the couple a building permit to replace their home destroyed by the Nov. 8 fire that killed 85 people. The couple told reporters they never thought about leaving. Paradise Mayor Jody Jones said the Buzzards' permit is a sign that the town will rebuild.(Hector Amezcua/The Sacramento Bee via AP)
March 29, 2019 - 3:42 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Small signs of rebuilding the California town of Paradise after it was destroyed by wildfire are sprouting this spring, including the issuing of the first permits to rebuild two the 11,000 homes destroyed five months ago. The city issued the first permit Thursday to Jason and...
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Larry Poell, who lives on top of a Superfund site in Mead, Neb., adjusts Wednesday, March 27, 2019, the overalls of his granddaughter, while visiting a flood relief shelter in Ashland. Poell said federal officials have always maintained that the contaminated plumes are stable, but he wonders if the floodwater caused them to shift. "I'm concerned about it, I think everybody's concerned about it," he said. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik)
March 28, 2019 - 11:48 am
MEAD, Neb. (AP) — Flooding in the Midwest temporarily cut off a Superfund site in Nebraska that stores radioactive waste and explosives, inundated another one storing toxic chemical waste in Missouri, and limited access to others, federal regulators said Wednesday. The Environmental Protection...
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