Fungi

FILE - In this May 24, 2019, file photo a vendor bags psilocybin mushrooms at a pop-up cannabis market in Los Angeles. Despite pandemic conditions that made normal signature-gathering almost impossible, activists in the nation's capital say they have enough signatures for a November ballot initiative that would decriminalize natural psychedelics such as mescaline and psilocybin mushrooms. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel, File)
July 13, 2020 - 6:29 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The posters started blanketing light posts just a few weeks after the city entered what would be a monthslong stay-at-home order. Vividly colored and bearing a three-headed mushroom, they asked Washingtonians to “reform laws for plant and fungi medicines” by making natural...
Read More
In this Friday, May 24, 2019 photo a vendor bags psilocybin mushrooms at a cannabis marketplace in Los Angeles. Oakland City Council will vote Tuesday, June 4, 2019, to decriminalize the possession and use of entheogenic, or psychoactive, plants and fungi. (AP Photo/Richard Vogel)
June 05, 2019 - 3:43 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Oakland on Tuesday became the second U.S. city to decriminalize magic mushrooms after a string of speakers testified that psychedelics helped them overcome depression, drug addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder. The City Council voted unanimously to decriminalize the...
Read More
June 05, 2019 - 2:19 am
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The Latest on Oakland voting to decriminalize magic mushrooms (all times local): 11:20 p.m. Oakland has become the second U.S. city to decriminalize magic mushrooms after speakers testified that psychedelics had helped them overcome depression, drug addiction and post-traumatic...
Read More
In this March 4, 2019, photo, Jamie Adams shows some intact beer bottles recovered from the shipwreck of the SS Oregon at his St. James Brewery in Holbrook, N.Y. Adams created an ale called Deep Ascent using the yeast from the bottles recovered from the Liverpool-to-New York luxury liner that sank off Fire Island in 1886. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
March 15, 2019 - 1:15 am
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — An ale introduced at a New York craft beer festival this month comes with an intriguing backstory — brewed from yeast in beer that went down on a doomed steamship and languished on the ocean floor for 131 years. Long Island brewer Jamie Adams created Deep Ascent ale using yeast...
Read More
January 11, 2019 - 9:36 am
COROLLA, N.C. (AP) — After a fungus-like disease known as "swamp cancer" claimed the lives of seven wild ponies on a Virginia island, wild horses in North Carolina's Outer Banks are being monitored for signs of a similar outbreak. The News & Observer reports the Corolla Wild Horse Fund warns...
Read More
Scientist Ester Gaya examines the fungus Isaria sinclairii on an insect also known as a zombie fungus at Kew Gardens' fungarium in London, Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018. The release Wednesday of the scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew “State of the World’s Fungi” report, is touted as the first ever global look at the way fungi help provide food, medicine, plant nutrition, lifesaving drugs _ and can also spread death and destruction at an alarming pace. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
September 12, 2018 - 6:55 am
LONDON (AP) — The scientists at the renowned Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew are trying to correct an injustice: They don't believe fungus gets the respect it deserves. That's one reason behind the release Wednesday of their "State of the World's Fungi " report, touted as the first ever global look at...
Read More
This undated photo provided by Corinne Richards-Zawacki in March 2018 shows a healthy golden frog in the streams of Panama. A deadly fungal disease devastated amphibians in Central America more than a decade ago, quieting some mountain streams. But new research released on Thursday, March 28, 2018 shows evolution may have saved the day _ and the frogs. (Corinne Richards-Zawacki/via AP)
March 29, 2018 - 2:27 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — After years of silence, the rhythmic dee-dee-deeps of frogs and toads are returning in parts of Panama. A deadly fungal disease devastated amphibians in Central America more than a decade ago, quieting some mountain streams. But new research shows evolution may have saved the day...
Read More
December 23, 2017 - 8:01 am
PARIS (AP) — Urban scientists and Paris foodies are getting excited about a bizarre discovery atop a hotel near the Eiffel Tower: the first-ever wild truffle growing in the French capital. It's just one 25-gram (0.9-ounce) winter truffle. But truffles normally sprout only in limited areas of...
Read More
In this Tuesday, April 25, 2017 photo, assistant research technician Henri Berger, talks about live yeast cultures at a New York University lab in the Alexandria Center for Life Sciences in New York, where researchers are attempting to create completely man-made, custom-built DNA. The yeast genome is like a chain with 12 million chemical links, known by the letters, A, C, T and G. That’s less than one-hundredth the size of the human genome, which has 3.2 billion links. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
July 26, 2017 - 7:26 am
NEW YORK (AP) — At Jef Boeke's lab, you can whiff an odor that seems out of place, as if they were baking bread here. But he and his colleagues are cooking up something else altogether: yeast that works with chunks of man-made DNA. Scientists have long been able to make specific changes in the DNA...
Read More
FILE - In this Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1999 file photo, Pavel Svihra, a horticultural advisor with the University of California, holds an ambrosia beetle in his palm in San Rafael, Calif. Researchers from Mississippi and Florida say a single fungus-farming beetle inadvertently imported to Georgia apparers to be the one and only source of a disease that has killed an estimated 300 million redbay trees and is threatening Florida's avocado groves. The beetle and its fungus arrived in Georgia in 2002, and their clones have spread west into Texas and north to North Carolina. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)
July 08, 2017 - 10:51 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Researchers from Mississippi and Florida say a single female fungus-farming beetle could have been the source of a disease that has killed an estimated 300 million redbay trees and threatens Florida's avocado groves. The beetle and her fungus arrived in Georgia in 2002, and their...
Read More

Pages