Genetic testing

Linda Morris looks over her Medicare statements, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 2019, in Parker City, Ind. Federal law enforcement officials say they’ve taken down a nearly-$2 billion Medicare fraud scheme that exploited curiosity about genetic medicine by having seniors get their cheeks swabbed for unneeded DNA tests. A Medicare enrollee, Morris said she was roped in at a conference on aging well. The retired high school math and journalism teacher got her cheek swabbed by one of the many health vendors at the event. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)
September 27, 2019 - 11:01 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal law enforcement officials say they've taken down a $2-billion Medicare fraud scheme that enticed seniors to get their cheeks swabbed for unneeded DNA tests. "Operation Double Helix" targeted telemarketing companies, doctors and labs, in a joint effort by the FBI, U.S...
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FILE - In this Sept. 29, 2016 file photo, Spain's singer Julio Iglesias smiles during his star unveiling ceremony at the Walk of Fame in San Juan, Puerto Rico. A Spanish judge has ruled on Wednesday, July 10, 2019 that there exists sufficient evidence to determine that a 43-year-old Spanish man is the biological son of Julio Iglesias, despite the singer’s refusal to submit to genetic testing. The judge said the famous crooner’s refusal to have a DNA test, along with other evidence, is enough to rule in favor of the paternity suit brought by Javier Sanchez. (AP Photo/Carlos Giusti, File)
July 10, 2019 - 12:29 pm
MADRID (AP) — A judge in Spain has found there is sufficient evidence to establish that a 43-year-old man is the biological son of Julio Iglesias even though the singer refused to have a DNA test. The judge, in fact, cited Iglesias' refusal to submit to genetic testing as part of the evidence that...
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Graphic shows results of AP-NORC Center poll on attitudes toward genetic testing; 2c x 6 inches; 96.3 mm x 152 mm;
July 19, 2018 - 11:02 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Curiosity about ancestry is the main reason Americans seek genetic testing. But large segments of the public also want to know if they're at risk for various medical conditions — even if they can't do anything about it. A poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public...
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FILE - In this Aug. 15, 2017 file photo, patient Alison Cairnes, foreground, looks at images with her doctor Shumei Kato at the University of California San Diego in San Diego. Tumor profiling that sequenced Cairnes' cancer genes helped identify a treatment that proved effective for her gastric cancer. On Thursday, Nov. 30 the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved one such test by Foundation Medicine. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull, File)
December 01, 2017 - 10:39 am
U.S. regulators have approved a first-of-a-kind test that looks for mutations in hundreds of cancer genes at once, giving a more complete picture of what's driving a patient's tumor and aiding efforts to match treatments to those flaws. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Foundation...
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April 06, 2017 - 4:30 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time, U.S. regulators have authorized a company to tell consumers directly about their individual genetic risk of certain diseases and conditions without involving a health care professional. The California-based company 23andMe gained approval from the Food and Drug...
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