Geology

June 25, 2018 - 10:06 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A U.S. judge who held a hearing about climate change that received widespread attention ruled Monday that Congress and the president were best suited to address the contribution of fossil fuels to global warming, throwing out lawsuits that sought to hold big oil companies...
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With members of the National Guard in the foreground, volcanic gases rise from active fissures near Pahoa, Hawaii on Tuesday, May 15, 2018. Most of the nearby Hawaii Volcanoes National Park remains closed to visitors due to ongoing seismic activity and the possibility of an explosion at the summit. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)
May 16, 2018 - 5:09 am
HONOLULU (AP) — Patricia Deter moved from Oregon to Hawaii to be closer to her two daughters, but the Kilauea volcano burned down her home only a month after she bought it. Now Deter and others who have recently lost homes to the lava-spewing mountain are on an urgent quest for answers about...
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Visitors watch as steam and gas rise from Kilauea's summit crater in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Geologists warned Wednesday that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could erupt explosively and send boulders, rocks and ash into the air around its summit in the coming weeks. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
May 10, 2018 - 1:14 am
PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — Geologists warned Wednesday that Hawaii's Kilauea volcano could erupt explosively and send boulders, rocks and ash into the air around its summit in the coming weeks. The risk will rise as lava drains from the summit crater down the flank of the volcano, and explosions could...
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FILE - In this Sept. 3, 2017, file photo, Earthquake and Volcano of the Korea Monitoring Division Director Ryoo Yong-gyu speaks to the media about North Korea's artificial earthquake with a map of the Korean peninsular in Seoul, South Korea. A study by Chinese geologists shows the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has collapsed under the stress of the explosions, rendering it unsafe for further testing and necessitating monitoring for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the University of Science and Technology of China may shed new light on North Korean President Kim Jong Un's announcement that his country was ceasing its testing program.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)
April 26, 2018 - 4:51 am
BEIJING (AP) — Research by Chinese geologists suggests that the mountain above North Korea's main nuclear test site has likely collapsed, rendering it unsafe for further testing and requiring that it be monitored for any leaking radiation. The findings by the scientists at the University of Science...
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FILE - In this Oct. 30, 2012 file photo, the intersection of 8th Street and Atlantic Avenue is flooded in Ocean City, N.J., after the storm surge from Superstorm Sandy flooded much of the town. New satellite research shows that global warming is making seas rise at an ever increasing rate. Scientists say melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica is speeding up sea level rise so that by the year 2100 on average oceans will be two feet higher than today, probably even more. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
February 12, 2018 - 3:56 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — New satellite research shows melting ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica are speeding up already rising seas. At the current rate, the world's oceans on average will be at least 2 feet (61 centimeters) higher by the end of the century compared to today, according to researchers...
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This Dec. 21, 2016 photo shows the eastern Sierra Nevada, with Mt. Whitney, the second-highest peak in the U.S., the largest of three pinnacles at center, near Lone Pine, Calif. Loss of water from rocks during drought caused California's Sierra Nevada to rise nearly an inch in height from October 2011 to October 2015, according to a new NASA study made public Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017. The study also found that in the following two years of increased snow and rain, the rocks in the range regained about half as much water as was lost during the drought and the return of the weight caused the height of the mountains to fall about half an inch. (AP Photo/Brian Melley)
December 13, 2017 - 8:13 pm
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Loss of water from rocks during drought caused California's Sierra Nevada to rise nearly an inch (2.5 centimeters) in height from October 2011 to October 2015, according to a new NASA study made public Wednesday. The study also found that in the following two years of increased...
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Water from New York Harbor surrounds the southern tip of New York's Manhattan borough on Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2017, seen from aboard a Staten Island Ferry. Superstorm Sandy roared ashore five years ago, Monday, Oct. 29, 2012, devastating the coastlines of New Jersey, New York and parts of Connecticut and becoming one of the costliest storms in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
October 27, 2017 - 4:08 pm
Five years after Superstorm Sandy was supposed to have taught the U.S. a lesson about the dangers of living along the coast, disaster planning experts say there is no place in America truly prepared for climate change and the tempests it could bring. That is true even in New York and New Jersey,...
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October 23, 2017 - 11:54 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Within the next three decades, floods that used to strike the New York City area only once every 500 years could occur every five years, according to a new scientific study released just days before the fifth anniversary of Superstorm Sandy. The study, performed by researchers at...
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In this photo provided by Peter Zabrok, climber Ryan Sheridan who had just reached the top of El Capitan, a 7,569-foot (2,307 meter) formation, when a rock slide let loose below him Thursday, Sept. 28, 2017, in Yosemite National Park, Calif. It was not immediately clear if there were new casualties, a day after another slab dropped from El Capitan, killing a British climber and injuring a second. (Peter Zabrok via AP)
September 29, 2017 - 7:54 pm
YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK, Calif. (AP) — A geological analysis Friday found there was no more danger than usual of another giant rock fall after two huge slides, including one involving a slab of granite the size of a 36-story building, occurred this week on the famed El Capitan rock formation in...
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FILE - This Saturday, April 15, 2017, file photo shows President Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate in Palm Beach, Fla. President Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement could accelerate damage to his family’s real estate empire in the coming decades, especially his properties that lie just feet from the encroaching sea in low-lying South Florida. Projections from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show that Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate, the apartment towers bearing his name on Miami-area beaches and his Doral golf course are all threatened by rising seas. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
June 08, 2017 - 3:03 am
PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump's decision to pull out of the Paris climate agreement could accelerate damage to his family's real estate empire in the coming decades, especially his properties that lie just feet from the encroaching sea in low-lying South Florida. The president's...
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