Glaciers

In this image taken Saturday, June 17, 2017, debris is strewn about at the scene where a second-story deck collapsed at a lodge near Lakeside, Mont. Authorities now say more than 30 people were taken to hospitals after the second-story deck of a Montana lodge collapsed during a memorial event for a firefighter. About 50 people were gathered to remember William Nickel, a longtime Flathead Valley firefighter who died in April. (Firefighter/Engineer Mathew Borlandelli/Somers/Lakeside Fire Department via AP)
June 18, 2017 - 7:21 pm
LAKESIDE, Mont. (AP) — A total of 32 people were taken to hospitals after the second-story deck of a Montana lodge collapsed during a memorial event for a firefighter, authorities said. Six people were airlifted via helicopter Saturday shortly after the collapse of the deck in Glacier Presbyterian...
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April 22, 2017 - 7:40 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The Blackfeet Indian Reservation rolls across the plains just east of Glacier National Park. There's a hotel and casino. There are gas stations, a few eateries and a museum to learn about the culture and history of the people that have occupied the territory long before the...
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In this photo provided by Jim Best/University of Illinois, taken in 2016, a close-up view of the ice-walled canyon at the terminus of the Kaskawulsh Glacier, with recently collapsed ice blocks. This canyon now carries almost all meltwater from the toe of the glacier down the Kaskawulsh Valley and toward the Gulf of Alaska and the Pacific Ocean instead of the Bering Sea. (Jim Best/University of Illinois via AP)
April 17, 2017 - 12:33 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have witnessed the first modern case of what they call "river piracy" and they blame global warming. Most of the water gushing from a large glacier in northwest Canada last year suddenly switched from one river to another. That changed the Slims River from a 10-foot (3...
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In this photo provided by James Balog/Extreme Ice Survey and Matthew Kennedy, the Stein glacier in Switzerland in 2015. Over the past decade or so scientists and photographers keep returning to the world’s glaciers, watching them shrink with each visit. Now they want other people to see what haunts them in a series of before and after photos. (Matthew Kennedy/Earth Vision Institute via AP)
April 03, 2017 - 2:08 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Over the past decade, scientists and photographers keep returning to the world's glaciers, watching them shrink with each visit. Now they want others to see how a warming planet is melting masses of ice in a series of before-and-after photos. In the Geological Society of America's...
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