Hurricane Katrina

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards places a state flag onto the casket during a Celebration of Life Interfaith Service for former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, at St. Joseph Cathedral in Baton Rouge, La., Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019. Thursday was the first of three days of public events to honor Blanco, the state's first female governor who died after a years long struggle with cancer.(AP Photo/Michael Democker, Pool)
August 22, 2019 - 12:47 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana's first and only female governor, Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, will return to the state's ornate Capitol building for her last time Thursday, with her casket carried in to the sound of a 21-gun salute honoring her service. Mourners are expected to pack the building...
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FILE- In this Sept. 5, 2005 file photo. President Bush, right, accompanied by Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Blanco, arrives in Baton Rouge, La., for a briefing at the state Office of Emergency Preparedness, following the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina. Shown with the president are, from right, Army Lt. Gen. Russel Honore, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, and Maj. Gen. Bennett Landreneau, head of the Louisiana National Guard. Blanco, who became Louisiana's first female elected governor only to see her political career derailed by the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, died Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019. She was 76. (Patrick Dennis/The Advocate via AP, Pool, File)
August 18, 2019 - 8:41 pm
BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Former Louisiana Gov. Kathleen Babineaux Blanco, who became the state's first female elected governor only to see her political career derailed by the devastation of Hurricane Katrina, has died. After struggling for years with cancer, Blanco died Sunday in hospice care in...
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August 17, 2019 - 2:36 pm
Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP’s news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
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Karon Hill, left, and Celeste Cruz battle the wind and rain from Hurricane Barry as it nears landfall Saturday, July 13, 2019, in New Orleans. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 13, 2019 - 7:10 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Barry rolled into the Louisiana coast Saturday, flooding highways, forcing people to scramble to rooftops and dumping heavy rain that could test the levees and pumps that were bolstered after Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans in 2005. After briefly becoming a Category 1...
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The Mississippi River is at 16 feet, which is just below flood stage, 17 feet, in New Orleans, Thursday, July 11, 2019 ahead of Tropical Storm Barry from the Gulf of Mexico. The river levees protect to about 20 feet, which the river may reach if predicted storm surge prevents the river from flowing into the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 13, 2019 - 7:09 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — When it comes to water, New Orleans faces three threats: the sea, the sky and the river. Tropical storms and hurricanes send storm surges pushing up against the city's outer defenses. That's what happened in 2005 when Hurricane Katrina's surge caused widespread levee failures and...
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Alan and Dot Richardson, from England, wear ponchos as they walk along Bourbon Street in the French Quarter Friday, July 12, 2019, in New Orleans, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. The National Weather Service in New Orleans says water is already starting to cover some low lying roads as Tropical Storm Barry approaches the state from the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
July 12, 2019 - 11:27 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Homeowners sandbagged their doors and tourists trying to get out of town jammed the airport Friday as Tropical Storm Barry began rolling in, threatening an epic drenching that could test how well New Orleans has strengthened its flood protections in the 14 years since Hurricane...
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July 12, 2019 - 6:39 pm
Good afternoon! Here's a look at how AP's news coverage is shaping up today in the Deep South. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to: The Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org The Columbia AP Bureau at 803-799-5510 or apcolumbia@ap.org The...
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People walk past Brennan's restaurant in the French Quarter with sandbags on the front door as bands of rain from Tropical Storm Barry from the Gulf of Mexico move into New Orleans, La., Friday, July 12, 2019. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 12, 2019 - 6:23 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Go or stay? It is a question people in and around New Orleans ask themselves every time a threatening storm lurks in the Gulf: a major hurricane like Katrina, which devastated the area in 2005 when levees failed, and now Tropical Storm Barry, which forecasters said was unlikely...
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The Mississippi River approaches a levee at left in New Orleans, La., Thursday, July 11, 2019, ahead of Tropical Storm Barry. Never in the modern history of New Orleans has water from the Mississippi River overtopped the city’s levees. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 12, 2019 - 3:00 pm
Even as Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans, the Mississippi River's levees held up when those in other parts of the city did not. But as Tropical Storm Barry threatened New Orleans with torrential rains that will test the city's flood defenses this weekend, the height of the city's river...
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St. Bernard Parish Sheriff's Office inmate workers move free sandbags for residents in Chalmette, La., Thursday, July 11, 2019. The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency is telling people in the southern part of the state to be prepared for heavy rain from Tropical Storm Barry as it pushes northward through the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)
July 11, 2019 - 10:59 pm
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Thousands of Louisianans broke out sandbags or fled to higher ground Thursday as Tropical Storm Barry threatened to turn into the first hurricane of the season and blow ashore with torrential rains that could pose a severe test of New Orleans' improved post-Katrina flood defenses...
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