Intelligence agencies

January 12, 2020 - 5:54 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is preparing to remove more than a dozen Saudi military students from a training program and return them to their home country after an investigation into a deadly shooting by a Saudi aviation student at a Florida navy base last month, a U.S. official told The...
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FILE - This Thursday, April 18, 2019 file photo shows special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election as released in Washington. An Associated Press review shows the idea of Ukrainian interference took root during Donald Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign, was spread online and then amplified by Putin before some of America’s elected officials made it their truth. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
January 12, 2020 - 1:06 pm
The theory took root in vague form well before Donald Trump laid claim to the White House in 2016. The candidate’s close confidant tweeted about it. His campaign chairman apparently spoke about it with people close to him. What if, the idea went, it was actually Ukraine — and not Russia — that was...
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FILE - In this Dec. 9, 2019, file photo, FBI Director Christopher Wray speaks during an interview with The Associated Press in Washington. The FBI said Friday it was taking steps to improve the accuracy and completeness of its wiretap applications for national security investigations and to provide better training for agents. The changes were described in a 30-page filing with the secretive Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)
January 10, 2020 - 8:58 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI laid out new protocols Friday for how it conducts electronic surveillance in national security cases, responding to a Justice Department inspector general report that harshly criticized the bureau's handling of the Russia investigation. The changes, detailed in a 30-page...
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FILE - In this Dec. 23, 2013, file photo, a woman using a phone walks past Apple's logo near its retail outlet in Beijing. The FBI is asking Apple to help extract data from iPhones that belonged to the Saudi aviation student who fatally shot three sailors at a U.S. naval base in Florida in December 2019. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)
January 08, 2020 - 4:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI asked Apple this week to help extract data from iPhones that belonged to the Saudi aviation student who investigators say fatally shot three sailors at a U.S. naval base in Florida last month. Investigators have been trying to access the two devices — an iPhone 7 and an...
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FILE - In this Dec. 18, 2018, file photo, President Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn arrives at federal court in Washington. In reversal, US prosecutors no longer oppose prison time for former Trump national security adviser Michael Flynn. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)
January 07, 2020 - 2:26 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former national security adviser Michael Flynn deserves up to six months behind bars, the Justice Department said Tuesday, reversing its earlier position that he was entitled to avoid prison time because of his extensive cooperation with prosecutors. The...
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In this picture released by the official website of the office of the Iranian supreme leader, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, right, meets family of Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in the U.S. airstrike in Iraq, at his home in Tehran, Iran, Friday, Jan. 3, 2020. Iran has vowed "harsh retaliation" for the U.S. airstrike near Baghdad's airport that killed Tehran's top general and the architect of its interventions across the Middle East. (Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader via AP)
January 03, 2020 - 6:18 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Iran’s retaliation for the United States' targeted killing of its top general is likely to include cyberattacks, security experts warned Friday. Iran’s state-backed hackers are already among the world’s most aggressive and could inject malware that triggers major disruptions to the U...
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In this Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019 photo, Giacomo Ziani, the co-founder of the app ToTok, speaks to The Associated Press in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Ziani, whose video and voice calling app is suspected of being a spying tool of the United Arab Emirates, defended his work in an interview with the AP, while denying knowing that people and companies linked to the project had ties to the country's intelligence apparatus. (AP Photo/Jon Gambrell)
January 02, 2020 - 6:28 pm
ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — If the popular ToTok video and voice calling app is a spying tool of the United Arab Emirates, that’s news to its co-creator. Giacomo Ziani defended his work in an interview with The Associated Press and said he had no knowledge that people and companies...
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Alexander Vavilov, the Toronto-born son of Russian spies, whose Canadian citizenship has now been affirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada, poses for a portrait after speaking to media in Toronto, Friday, Dec. 20, 2019. (Chris Young/The Canadian Press via AP)
December 20, 2019 - 10:46 pm
TORONTO (AP) — The son of a Russian spy couple who lived clandestine lives in Canada and the United States said Friday that he wants a future in Canada after the country's Supreme Court ruled he can keep his Canadian citizenship. Alexander Vavilov was born in Toronto, which would typically qualify...
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December 20, 2019 - 7:15 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The presiding judge of a secretive national security court directed the Justice Department to identify all cases before it that involved an FBI lawyer accused of altering an email related to the surveillance of a former Trump campaign adviser, according to an order unsealed Friday...
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FILE - In this July 1, 2010, file photo, Alex Vavilov, right, and his older brother brother Tim leave a federal court after a bail hearing for their parents Donald Heathfield and Tracey Ann Foley, in Boston, Massachusetts. Canada's Supreme Court has ruled on Thursday, Dec. 19, 2019, that Alex Vavilov, the son of a Russian spy couple who lived clandestine lives in Canada and the United States, can keep his Canadian citizenship. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola, File)
December 19, 2019 - 6:22 pm
TORONTO (AP) — Canada's Supreme Court ruled Thursday that he son of a Russian spy couple who lived clandestine lives in Canada and the United States can keep his Canadian citizenship. Alexander Vavilov was born in Toronto, which would typically qualify him for Canadian citizenship. But authorities...
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