Interracial couples

May 08, 2019 - 9:55 am
ATLANTA (AP) — A councilman in a mostly white north Georgia town who drew nationwide scorn for his comments on interracial marriage says he's considering stepping down from his position. Hoschton (HOOSH-ton) City Council member Jim Cleveland told The Associated Press on Wednesday that he's praying...
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This undated illustration provided by Tinder/Emojination shows new variations of interracial emoji couples. In the world of emojis, interracial couples had virtually no options in terms of skin tone. But the emoji gods, otherwise known as the Unicode Consortium, recently rectified that, approving 71 new variations. Using six skin tones already available for one-person emojis, vendors such as Apple, Google and Microsoft will now be able to offer couples of color. Additions are expected later this year. (Tinder/Emojination via AP)
March 08, 2019 - 6:46 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — In 1664, Maryland passed the first British colonial law banning marriage between whites and slaves. An 1883 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that state prohibitions on interracial marriage don't violate the Fourteenth Amendment held for more than 80 years. While such impediments to...
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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle leave after their wedding ceremony at St. George's Chapel in Windsor Castle in Windsor, near London, England, Saturday, May 19, 2018. (Ben Birchhall/pool photo via AP)
May 19, 2018 - 8:56 pm
WINDSOR, England (AP) — The son of British royalty and the daughter of middle-class Americans wed Saturday in a service that reflected Prince Harry's royal heritage, Meghan Markle's biracial roots and the pair's shared commitment to putting a more diverse, modern face on the monarchy. British...
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This undated photo provided by the Arizona Department of Corrections shows Travis Ricci. Ricci, who authorities said was a member of a white supremacist group, is being tried in Phoenix on a murder charge in a woman's 2009 shooting death. Prosecutors say the woman, who was white, was killed because Ricci was upset that she was dating a black man. Ricci is currently serving a 22-year prison sentence in an unrelated case for aggravated assault and misconduct involving weapons. (Arizona Department of Corrections via AP)
May 06, 2018 - 11:32 am
PHOENIX (AP) — An interracial couple was walking near a Phoenix park when authorities say a shirtless neo-Nazi began angrily yelling a racial slur and harassing the black man in the couple over dating a white woman. Authorities say the men exchanged tense words before Travis Ricci rushed back to a...
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This Jan. 26, 1965 file photo shows Mildred Loving and her husband Richard P Loving. Fifty years after Mildred and Richard Loving’s landmark legal challenge shattered the laws against interracial marriage in the U.S., some couples of different races still talk of facing discrimination, disapproval and sometimes outright hostility from their fellow Americans. (AP Photo)
June 12, 2017 - 4:40 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fifty years after Mildred and Richard Loving's landmark legal challenge shattered the laws against interracial marriage in the U.S., some couples of different races still talk of facing discrimination, disapproval and sometimes outright hostility from their fellow Americans...
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The graves of Richard and Mildred Loving are seen in a rural cemetery near their former home in Caroline County, Virginia, Wednesday, June 7, 2017. Richard Loving, a white man, and his wife Mildred, a black woman, challenged Virginia’s ban on interracial marriage and ultimately won their case at the U.S. Supreme Court in 1967. Monday, June 12, 2017 marks 50 years since the Supreme Court issued that opinion, which overturned laws against interracial marriage in 16 states. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
June 11, 2017 - 3:44 pm
MILFORD, Va. (AP) — EDITOR'S NOTE: On June 12, 1967, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously struck down as unconstitutional 16 state bans on interracial marriage. The ruling came in a lawsuit brought by Richard and Mildred Loving, a white man and black woman who had been jailed for being married to...
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This Jan. 26, 1965 file photo shows Mildred Loving and her husband Richard P Loving. Fifty years after Mildred and Richard Loving’s landmark legal challenge shattered the laws against interracial marriage in the U.S., some couples of different races still talk of facing discrimination, disapproval and sometimes outright hostility from their fellow Americans. (AP Photo)
June 11, 2017 - 9:47 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Fifty years after Mildred and Richard Loving's landmark legal challenge shattered the laws against interracial marriage in the U.S., some couples of different races still talk of facing discrimination, disapproval and sometimes outright hostility from their fellow Americans...
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